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  1. #38801
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    30 years down this summer. Looking towards the wind-down.
    Bless you. My last boss put in 30 and never had more than two weeks off in her life. I have, uh, taken substantially more and longer breaks in my career than that. 😂

  2. #38802
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Going on 16 days of some plant-induced rash on my leg. Itís fading but still itchy.

  3. #38803
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Bless you. My last boss put in 30 and never had more than two weeks off in her life. I have, uh, taken substantially more and longer breaks in my career than that. 😂
    I have a somewhat healthier life balance than that, at least in my own mind. But Iíve hit it hard for a long time too and can see the exit ramp on the horizon.

  4. #38804
    I'm trying to figure out how to steer down that exit ramp. Tax season hours are starting to wear thin. Having two retired sisters in the are doesn't help.

  5. #38805
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    What did you do that was 12 hour nights? That sounds medical. I thought you worked in insurance.
    Before grad school I was in manufacturing of continuous filament nonwovens. We spun our own fibers so ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our main customers were hygiene(diapers both babies and adults), medical(masks either surgical or N95), consumer goods(fabric softener sheets), agricultural(landscaping fabrics and crop protection), construction(housewrap), and furniture(wrapping of lumber components before mounting fabric or leather).

    I started off supporting production line directly on a manufacturing team, then designing equipment, then supporting production as a product owner. Used to visit all our other manufacturing plants(Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, all over the US) as well as customers. It was a lot of fun. I loved the international aspect to it.

  6. #38806
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    The teacher schedule is pretty great. Weíre not *actually* done at 3pm, and the mornings are pretty darned early. Itís also a harsher grind day by day than I think most people realize. But the holidays and of course summer are divine.

  7. #38807
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    Before grad school I was in manufacturing of continuous filament nonwovens. We spun our own fibers so ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our main customers were hygiene(diapers both babies and adults), medical(masks either surgical or N95), consumer goods(fabric softener sheets), agricultural(landscaping fabrics and crop protection), construction(housewrap), and furniture(wrapping of lumber components before mounting fabric or leather).

    I started off supporting production line directly on a manufacturing team, then designing equipment, then supporting production as a product owner. Used to visit all our other manufacturing plants(Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, all over the US) as well as customers. It was a lot of fun. I loved the international aspect to it.
    A market that developed after I left was many of the semi-disposable bags for shopping. The ones not coated with a printed film but just a printed logo on the fabric.

  8. #38808
    Quote Originally Posted by DukieInKansas View Post
    I'm trying to figure out how to steer down that exit ramp. Tax season hours are starting to wear thin. Having two retired sisters in the are doesn't help.
    It can't help that they've extended them the last couple of years.

  9. #38809
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    Before grad school I was in manufacturing of continuous filament nonwovens. We spun our own fibers so ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our main customers were hygiene(diapers both babies and adults), medical(masks either surgical or N95), consumer goods(fabric softener sheets), agricultural(landscaping fabrics and crop protection), construction(housewrap), and furniture(wrapping of lumber components before mounting fabric or leather).

    I started off supporting production line directly on a manufacturing team, then designing equipment, then supporting production as a product owner. Used to visit all our other manufacturing plants(Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, all over the US) as well as customers. It was a lot of fun. I loved the international aspect to it.
    I find this to be fascinating. I was telling teenagers to do a better job folding t shirts out of college.

  10. #38810
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemmonsDevil View Post
    I find this to be fascinating. I was telling teenagers to do a better job folding t shirts out of college.
    Before and during manufacturing, I told teenagers to do proper PMCSs on their trucks.

    I never got the European trips, bosses always took those.



    *Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services. I was trained in all the Army's communication systems. That may be an overstatement. I was trained on them so that I could lead that type of unit. The military isn't always the most efficient when it comes to allocating labor.

  11. #38811
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    The teacher schedule is pretty great. Weíre not *actually* done at 3pm, and the mornings are pretty darned early. Itís also a harsher grind day by day than I think most people realize. But the holidays and of course summer are divine.
    I envy those summers and the winter breaks also. But I've known too many teachers and what they go through during the school year to be over envious.

  12. #38812
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston area, OK, Newton, right by Heartbreak Hill
    I've been on per diem status at my public health job for 5 years. I average about one project a year, so, for 3-4 months every year I work way too hard then not much the rest of the year. In 2019, I had no research projects and I actually made more money from my theater work. I will retire from my public health job when my boss either retires or steps down as division chief. I will probably never retire from theater. If I keep being able to learn lines like I can now, I'll get all the old lady parts. I have told a couple of my younger actor friends to be honest with me when I've lost it. For now, I can still learn lines really quickly. I hope I'll still be able to produce and direct and maybe even write when I can't learn lines anymore.

  13. #38813
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    I'm making larb with ground turkey.

    How was it? I have not dabbled enough in Asian cuisines and should expand my horizons.

  14. #38814
    Quote Originally Posted by Bostondevil View Post
    I've been on per diem status at my public health job for 5 years. I average about one project a year, so, for 3-4 months every year I work way too hard then not much the rest of the year. In 2019, I had no research projects and I actually made more money from my theater work. I will retire from my public health job when my boss either retires or steps down as division chief. I will probably never retire from theater. If I keep being able to learn lines like I can now, I'll get all the old lady parts. I have told a couple of my younger actor friends to be honest with me when I've lost it. For now, I can still learn lines really quickly. I hope I'll still be able to produce and direct and maybe even write when I can't learn lines anymore.
    Could a person make enough money in the community theater world (if I am using the wrong term here please forgive me) to live on? This subculture is endlessly fascinating to me.

  15. #38815
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    Before grad school I was in manufacturing of continuous filament nonwovens. We spun our own fibers so ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our main customers were hygiene(diapers both babies and adults), medical(masks either surgical or N95), consumer goods(fabric softener sheets), agricultural(landscaping fabrics and crop protection), construction(housewrap), and furniture(wrapping of lumber components before mounting fabric or leather).

    I started off supporting production line directly on a manufacturing team, then designing equipment, then supporting production as a product owner. Used to visit all our other manufacturing plants(Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, all over the US) as well as customers. It was a lot of fun. I loved the international aspect to it.
    That sounds cool. Conceptually, I am very interested in how things work and the origin stories o f all the things in our modern life. I even worked for a big company that was responsible for getting a lot of them there. I'm convinced that for the large majority of Americans 'how stuff is made' is essentially magic to them.

  16. #38816
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by Bostondevil View Post
    I've been on per diem status at my public health job for 5 years. I average about one project a year, so, for 3-4 months every year I work way too hard then not much the rest of the year. In 2019, I had no research projects and I actually made more money from my theater work. I will retire from my public health job when my boss either retires or steps down as division chief. I will probably never retire from theater. If I keep being able to learn lines like I can now, I'll get all the old lady parts. I have told a couple of my younger actor friends to be honest with me when I've lost it. For now, I can still learn lines really quickly. I hope I'll still be able to produce and direct and maybe even write when I can't learn lines anymore.
    I could get down with that schedule. I'd really like a job that allowed for a yearly sabbatical.

  17. #38817
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    Before grad school I was in manufacturing of continuous filament nonwovens. We spun our own fibers so ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Our main customers were hygiene(diapers both babies and adults), medical(masks either surgical or N95), consumer goods(fabric softener sheets), agricultural(landscaping fabrics and crop protection), construction(housewrap), and furniture(wrapping of lumber components before mounting fabric or leather).

    I started off supporting production line directly on a manufacturing team, then designing equipment, then supporting production as a product owner. Used to visit all our other manufacturing plants(Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, all over the US) as well as customers. It was a lot of fun. I loved the international aspect to it.
    I know what you mean, I spent 25 years in manufacturing...it can be quite fascinating...

  18. #38818
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    I know what you mean, I spent 25 years in manufacturing...it can be quite fascinating...
    I wouldn't mind getting back to it. Still working some angles.

  19. #38819
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    I wouldn't mind getting back to it. Still working some angles.
    You guys should find a job talking about the work other people do or should do. It's glorious. And it comes with an expense account. I really do love what I do, but the younger version of me who still dwells inside of me doesn't think it has enough fishing or manual labor involved.

  20. #38820
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston area, OK, Newton, right by Heartbreak Hill
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemmonsDevil View Post
    Could a person make enough money in the community theater world (if I am using the wrong term here please forgive me) to live on? This subculture is endlessly fascinating to me.
    Community theater - no. Fringe - not really. Anything above that? Yes, kinda.

    Community theater is a specific definition and community theaters pay royalties at a lower rate. They are also the theaters that can have the rights pulled last minute if a professional theater decides to mount the same show. There are rather strict rules about who can be paid for a community theater production (director and sometimes some of the tech designers), but the label community theater means that the community is doing the work - on a volunteer basis.

    Fringe theaters pay people but they mostly aren't Equity houses (Actors' Equity Association, the union, which sets payment rates/working conditions). Actors/directors/stage managers/tech designers get a small stipend, usually enough to cover gas and parking for the full run. Some fringe theaters are hybrids in that they will hire a certain percentage Equity actors during the season (the exact number of Equity roles is often worked out ahead of time with AEA) but those are usually the more established fringe theaters. Almost no brand new fringe companies have the resources to mount Equity shows. Equity houses are the theater companies who cast majority Equity actors in all their productions. Actors who perform in these productions who are not Equity automatically become Equity eligible. I'm not Equity so I don't know the exact rules, but, once you've done enough work as Equity eligible you have to join the union or declare that you are not going that route (but then you stop getting Equity eligible roles.)

    I don't think I know anybody in theater that doesn't have a day job.

    Gross generalization:

    Community theater workers are mostly college theater majors who have day jobs that have nothing to do with theater. There are very talented people working at all levels of community theater but at the end of the day, it's their hobby.

    Fringe theater workers are mostly college theater majors who have day jobs in theater. They act/direct/produce at night and teach theater or work for an Equity house as house managers or lit managers or in the box office or the costume department or doing community outreach or marketing.

    I don't know about other staff (directors etc) who work in Equity houses, but the actors often have day jobs. They teach theater too - more often in college theater departments than the fringe types who teach to kids. There are multiple costumed tour companies around Boston and lots of Equity actors work as their tour guides. For a good many of them, the day job is secondary income. In Boston, acting is never steady work. We don't have Broadway - shows don't run for years, except for Shear Madness. Alas, the pandemic shut down Shear Madness.

    So, it is entirely possible in Boston to make a living only working in theater but not only as an actor.


    I do not fit into any of these groups but I got started in theater as a playwright. Playwrights do not make enough money to support themselves purely from playwriting. I am a member of the Dramatist's Guild of America. I have made, lifetime, close to $2000 from my writing. That puts me ahead of more than 90% of the members of the Dramatist's Guild of America. The number of members of the Dramatist's Guild of America who support themselves solely from playwriting is 4. (Screenwriting does not count in this number. Selling your play to Hollywood is where the real money is.)

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