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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Bostondevil View Post
    90% of former college football players brains showed evidence of CTE.

    And among former NFL players, you just have to accept that it comes with the territory. When compared to other professional athletes, football players live much shorter lives. And former players, or not former players if they happen to be Tom Brady, usually show effects by the time they hit 40, if not before. Whenever I hear some sport show talking about Tom Brady acting weird, I think, "It's the CTE."
    No doubt it's a brutal sport. Admittedly, there are other violent sports too - hockey, lacrosse, etc. come to mind - but I think American football is in a class of its own. I'm not sure the sport should still exist and I especially question high schools and colleges ("institutions of higher learning") continuing to sponsor and fund teams. The late, great comedian and commentator, Dick Gregory, spoke at my high school (back in the 70's) and he told a story about his then teenage son coming to him, asking if he could play football. Dick said to him: "Are you crazy? If you went out and bought a brand new Mercedes, would you take it to a demolition derby?"

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North of Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by duke79 View Post
    No doubt it's a brutal sport. Admittedly, there are other violent sports too - hockey, lacrosse, etc. come to mind - but I think American football is in a class of its own. I'm not sure the sport should still exist and I especially question high schools and colleges ("institutions of higher learning") continuing to sponsor and fund teams. The late, great comedian and commentator, Dick Gregory, spoke at my high school (back in the 70's) and he told a story about his then teenage son coming to him, asking if he could play football. Dick said to him: "Are you crazy? If you went out and bought a brand new Mercedes, would you take it to a demolition derby?"
    Perhaps my perspective is just based on what I am personally experiencing, but I have been happy to see the growth of flag football. My middle school aged son plays on a team at his school and really enjoys it, and there are lots of programs around. He would never consider playing tackle football (nor would I allow him to).

    This will never serve as a replacement for tackle, especially if it never grows to the scholarship and/or pro level. But the NFL is clearly acknowledging it because I believe the pro bowl this year will include a flag game instead of the joke that the tackle pro bowl had turned into.

    However, no matter what happens, people will continue to want to see the big hits, and people will continue to be willing to hit and be hit.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Blacksburg, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by Tooold View Post
    I think the book was turned into a movie by the same name, Concussion. If my memory is correct, it was very believable and tragic, and the doctor really had to persevere through criticism and attacks from the NFL. And while IANAD, I find it very hard to believe that CTE is based on bad science. There are too many examples of players who have suffered terrible effects, including those who were diagnosed with CTE after their brains were autopsied after death.


    Your memory is right on.

    I found the book very convincing. Including the sub-plot of multi-mill…, whoops, make that multi-billion dollar industry trying hard to silence the little guy.

    One other interesting aspect of the book was the prevalence of CTE in professional wrestling. I had not heard that link previously.

  4. #24
    The best job in the NFL is Punter/Kicker followed by career backup QB.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by PackMan97 View Post
    The best job in the NFL is Punter/Kicker followed by career backup QB.
    Long snapper.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Bern, NC unless it's a home football game then I'm grilling on Devil's Alley
    Quote Originally Posted by PackMan97 View Post
    The best job in the NFL is Punter/Kicker followed by career backup QB.
    Quote Originally Posted by fidel View Post
    Long snapper.
    Yeah. You never hear of a "roughing the long snapper" penalty. They just run right around that dude.
    Q "Why do you like Duke, you didn't even go there." A "Because my art school didn't have a basketball team."

  7. #27
    https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/...es-source-says

    The unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant involved in clearing Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa during Sunday's game against the Buffalo Bills has been fired after it was found he made "several mistakes" in his evaluation, a league source told ESPN.

    The source said the NFL Players Association exercised its right to dismiss the consultant. The NFLPA and the league each have the right to fire a UNC without agreement from the other party.

    Tagovailoa briefly left Sunday's game after hitting the back of his head on the ground and stumbling while trying to return to the huddle. He was taken to the locker room and tested for a concussion but returned to the game after passing his evaluation. The Dolphins initially listed him as questionable to return with a head injury but later clarified that a back injury Tagovailoa suffered earlier in the game caused him to stumble.

    The NFLPA exercised its right to initiate a review of the league's concussion protocol in response to Tagovailoa's quick return to Sunday's game. A source told ESPN's Dan Graziano that the UNC was interviewed Friday as part of that investigation.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Quote Originally Posted by CameronDuke View Post
    https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/...es-source-says

    The unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant involved in clearing Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa during Sunday's game against the Buffalo Bills has been fired after it was found he made "several mistakes" in his evaluation, a league source told ESPN.

    The source said the NFL Players Association exercised its right to dismiss the consultant. The NFLPA and the league each have the right to fire a UNC without agreement from the other party.

    Tagovailoa briefly left Sunday's game after hitting the back of his head on the ground and stumbling while trying to return to the huddle. He was taken to the locker room and tested for a concussion but returned to the game after passing his evaluation. The Dolphins initially listed him as questionable to return with a head injury but later clarified that a back injury Tagovailoa suffered earlier in the game caused him to stumble.

    The NFLPA exercised its right to initiate a review of the league's concussion protocol in response to Tagovailoa's quick return to Sunday's game. A source told ESPN's Dan Graziano that the UNC was interviewed Friday as part of that investigation.
    So the injury vs Buffalo was a head injury afterall…

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North of Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by CameronDuke View Post
    https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/...es-source-says

    The unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant involved in clearing Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa during Sunday's game against the Buffalo Bills has been fired after it was found he made "several mistakes" in his evaluation, a league source told ESPN.

    The source said the NFL Players Association exercised its right to dismiss the consultant. The NFLPA and the league each have the right to fire a UNC without agreement from the other party.

    Tagovailoa briefly left Sunday's game after hitting the back of his head on the ground and stumbling while trying to return to the huddle. He was taken to the locker room and tested for a concussion but returned to the game after passing his evaluation. The Dolphins initially listed him as questionable to return with a head injury but later clarified that a back injury Tagovailoa suffered earlier in the game caused him to stumble.

    The NFLPA exercised its right to initiate a review of the league's concussion protocol in response to Tagovailoa's quick return to Sunday's game. A source told ESPN's Dan Graziano that the UNC was interviewed Friday as part of that investigation.
    I would like to know this person’s name, credentials and what hospital they work at. If 99% of the average shmo’s (such as myself) could see what was happening, an allegedly well-trained professional should have seen it.

    Though the fact that they were incompetent and referred to as a UNC kind of makes sense…

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyNotCrazie View Post
    I would like to know this person’s name, credentials and what hospital they work at. If 99% of the average shmo’s (such as myself) could see what was happening, an allegedly well-trained professional should have seen it.

    Though the fact that they were incompetent and referred to as a UNC kind of makes sense…
    I'm definetly on board with firing any UNC whenever possible.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    I seem to remember a study somewhere that showed that the impact from heading a soccer ball was actually generally greater than that experienced by football players with helmet to helmet contact.
    I don't remember where I saw it, but I think if we are going to have the conversation about football, we shouldn't omit other sports that can also cause significant head injury. I know that at least some youth soccer leagues have outlawed heading the ball. That's a step in the right direction.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC area
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I seem to remember a study somewhere that showed that the impact from heading a soccer ball was actually generally greater than that experienced by football players with helmet to helmet contact.
    I don't remember where I saw it, but I think if we are going to have the conversation about football, we shouldn't omit other sports that can also cause significant head injury. I know that at least some youth soccer leagues have outlawed heading the ball. That's a step in the right direction.
    Football isn't the only sport with concussions, certainly. But it stands alone for frequency, the massive hits simply built into the game.

    -jk

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by -jk View Post
    Football isn't the only sport with concussions, certainly. But it stands alone for frequency, the massive hits simply built into the game.

    -jk
    I don't watch much soccer, but I've definitely never seen a soccer player in the sort of compromised and terrifying body position Tua was in on Thursday.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC area
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    I don't watch much soccer, but I've definitely never seen a soccer player in the sort of compromised and terrifying body position Tua was in on Thursday.
    They have that magic spray in soccer for the really bad injuries.

    -jk

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC area
    From the CDC for kids' sports (couldn't find the pro sports version):
    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/...a4.htm#F2_down

    Among contact sports, the highest rates of TBI ED visits in 2018 in children aged 5–17 years were for injuries sustained while playing football (72.4), basketball (46.6), and soccer (32.5) *per 100,000
    -jk

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North of Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I seem to remember a study somewhere that showed that the impact from heading a soccer ball was actually generally greater than that experienced by football players with helmet to helmet contact.
    I don't remember where I saw it, but I think if we are going to have the conversation about football, we shouldn't omit other sports that can also cause significant head injury. I know that at least some youth soccer leagues have outlawed heading the ball. That's a step in the right direction.
    I coached my third grader’s rec soccer game today. Headers are strictly forbidden at that age - I was actually somewhat surprised when the ref blew the whistle when the ball gently bounced up and hit one of our players in the head because the ref considered it a header. I’m not sure at what age headers become permitted. All coaches also have to go through concussion training.

    I played competitive soccer at the same age 40 years ago and headers were a pretty big part of the game. So they have very consciously phased them out. It u it isn’t perfect but it helps.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    Yep

    Quote Originally Posted by Bostondevil View Post
    I don't watch football anymore, at any level, because of all the brain damage. CTE studies show evidence of CTE in 25-30% of players who quit after high school.
    Same here. There was a good story on All Things Considered last night (hosted by Michell Martin, a neighbor of mine).

    https://www.npr.org/2022/10/01/11264...ut-player-safe

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyNotCrazie View Post
    I coached my third grader’s rec soccer game today. Headers are strictly forbidden at that age - I was actually somewhat surprised when the ref blew the whistle when the ball gently bounced up and hit one of our players in the head because the ref considered it a header. I’m not sure at what age headers become permitted. All coaches also have to go through concussion training.

    I played competitive soccer at the same age 40 years ago and headers were a pretty big part of the game. So they have very consciously phased them out. It u it isn’t perfect but it helps.
    My kid is still years away for this, but from talking to other parents, I believe it is 12-U or 13-U around here where kids can start using their head.

  19. #39
    I hope they start to "use their head" at an earlier age. ☺️

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by cato View Post
    My kid is still years away for this, but from talking to other parents, I believe it is 12-U or 13-U around here where kids can start using their head.
    For school sports, headers are generally not legal until high school. For national youth soccer, it is officially forbidden in 11-U and below, and at 13-U and below, headers are allowed for only 30 minutes per practice, but headers are allowed in competitive games. So realistically, 12 and up have no restrictions, because there are no coaches that even want to extensively practice headers at that age, given how much training is needed with feet and positioning. But the players tend to be fairly reluctant to head the ball, as well, in my experience, except at the very highest levels of the sport.

    Can CTE still happen in soccer at any age? Sure. Just ask Cindy Parlow Cone. But it is relatively rare compared to the other kind of football. It is amazing how much safer things are when other people aren't actively trying to hit you.

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