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Thread: Ymm, Seafood

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Back in the 1700s, some laborers and maids had it written into their contracts that they only had to eat salmon a certain number of days since they were so very plentiful. Too much of a good thing I guess.
    There are now some salmon in the CT River as they've been re-introduced, and various organizations are removing dams to assist in the effort.
    Salmon were introduced into Lake Michigan in the early 1970s to eat alewives, a type of small shad or herring, that died off in huge, smelly numbers every year.

    From about 1975 to 1977, one of my friend's dad had a boat that was docked in Waukegan Harbor. We often went up and trolled for salmon. We caught some on every trip and would often grill them dockside, just delicious.

    I've been gone from the Midwest for almost 40 years but read that the alewife population is in serious decline perhaps due to some invasive mussel species. I'm not sure how the salmon population is holding up.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    In thinking about Lake Michigan fishing from my distant past, I also recall the annual smelt runs. We would wade into shallow waters with one guy on each end of the net and catch many small fish called smelt.

    The older made us young guys go into the very cold water to catch the fish. They would deep fry them and we'd eat them within an hour of catching them. They were pretty good but most anything that is fried tastes good.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    West Palm Beach, Fl
    I think they make better bait, Marty!

  4. #44
    Sauteed soft shell crabs. I'm getting misty-eyed...
    Nothing incites bodily violence quicker than a Duke fan turning in your direction and saying 'scoreboard.'

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Quote Originally Posted by TeacherTom View Post
    I think they make better bait, Marty!
    You are probably right, some things seem better with the passage of time.

    I don't think we even took the bones out. The fish and their bones were small enough that we'd fry them and just get a slight crunch from the bones.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by weezie View Post
    Sauteed soft shell crabs. I'm getting misty-eyed...
    Ooooh, you and I can be friends!

    Butter, salt, pepper, lemon.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by MartyClark View Post
    Salmon were introduced into Lake Michigan in the early 1970s to eat alewives, a type of small shad or herring, that died off in huge, smelly numbers every year.

    From about 1975 to 1977, one of my friend's dad had a boat that was docked in Waukegan Harbor. We often went up and trolled for salmon. We caught some on every trip and would often grill them dockside, just delicious.

    I've been gone from the Midwest for almost 40 years but read that the alewife population is in serious decline perhaps due to some invasive mussel species. I'm not sure how the salmon population is holding up.
    Similarly, landlocked salmon have been stocked in Lake Champlain (VT) for a long time, I've caught some big ones...Alewives: I thought those were the spouses of big drinkers! ...actually, we've got alewives here too, susceptible to death when the water temp changes, and yes, they smell real nasty...

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santa Cruz CA

    It's salmon season again!

    Had two successful trips the last week and a half. Maybe going again Saturday.


    Latest recipe I made up with our fresh salmon. Inspired by something I found online at NYT site.

    Salmon Roasted in Butter and Herbs

    Ingredients

    4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
    4 tablespoons or more minced chervil, parsley or dill
    1 salmon fillet, 1 1/2 to 2 pounds
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

    I have some nice chervil growing in my Aerogarden so that's how I found this recipe doing the search. You can do this with a nice big chunk of skin on or skinless salmon.

    Didn't do step by step pics, but here's what you do.

    Heat the oven up to 350-375. I did 350 with my convection turned on.

    Get a baking dish that the salmon will just barely fit in.
    Put the butter in the dish and half of the herbs. I used mostly chervil, but put a bit of finely chopped fresh rosemary in at this step also. Put it in the oven for 5 minutes to melt the butter.

    Salt and pepper the top side of the salmon. When the pan is ready, put the salmon in the pan skin side up and put in the oven for 5 minutes.

    Take the pan out and peel the skin off. Salt and pepper the newly exposed flesh and then flip the salmon over. Return to the oven and cook until the internal temperature is 135, probably another 10-15 minutes.

    Sprinkle the rest of the herbs on top and serve.
    Mine looked like this.


    Plated up with some fresh mushroom risotto and fava beans with bacon and onions.



    Pretty tasty stuff.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by BigWayne View Post
    Had two successful trips the last week and a half. Maybe going again Saturday.


    Latest recipe I made up with our fresh salmon. Inspired by something I found online at NYT site.

    Ingredients

    4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
    4 tablespoons or more minced chervil, parsley or dill
    1 salmon fillet, 1 1/2 to 2 pounds
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

    I have some nice chervil growing in my Aerogarden so that's how I found this recipe doing the search. You can do this with a nice big chunk of skin on or skinless salmon.

    Didn't do step by step pics, but here's what you do.

    Heat the oven up to 350-375. I did 350 with my convection turned on.

    Get a baking dish that the salmon will just barely fit in.
    Put the butter in the dish and half of the herbs. I used mostly chervil, but put a bit of finely chopped fresh rosemary in at this step also. Put it in the oven for 5 minutes to melt the butter.

    Salt and pepper the top side of the salmon. When the pan is ready, put the salmon in the pan skin side up and put in the oven for 5 minutes.

    Take the pan out and peel the skin off. Salt and pepper the newly exposed flesh and then flip the salmon over. Return to the oven and cook until the internal temperature is 135, probably another 10-15 minutes.

    Sprinkle the rest of the herbs on top and serve.
    Mine looked like this.


    Plated up with some fresh mushroom risotto and fava beans with bacon and onions.



    Pretty tasty stuff.
    Looks delicious.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by BigWayne View Post
    Had two successful trips the last week and a half. Maybe going again Saturday.


    Latest recipe I made up with our fresh salmon. Inspired by something I found online at NYT site.

    Salmon Roasted in Butter and Herbs

    Ingredients

    4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
    4 tablespoons or more minced chervil, parsley or dill
    1 salmon fillet, 1 1/2 to 2 pounds
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

    I have some nice chervil growing in my Aerogarden so that's how I found this recipe doing the search. You can do this with a nice big chunk of skin on or skinless salmon.

    Didn't do step by step pics, but here's what you do.

    Heat the oven up to 350-375. I did 350 with my convection turned on.

    Get a baking dish that the salmon will just barely fit in.
    Put the butter in the dish and half of the herbs. I used mostly chervil, but put a bit of finely chopped fresh rosemary in at this step also. Put it in the oven for 5 minutes to melt the butter.

    Salt and pepper the top side of the salmon. When the pan is ready, put the salmon in the pan skin side up and put in the oven for 5 minutes.

    Take the pan out and peel the skin off. Salt and pepper the newly exposed flesh and then flip the salmon over. Return to the oven and cook until the internal temperature is 135, probably another 10-15 minutes.

    Sprinkle the rest of the herbs on top and serve.
    Mine looked like this.


    Plated up with some fresh mushroom risotto and fava beans with bacon and onions.



    Pretty tasty stuff.
    I can’t tell you how much I enjoyed each and every aspect of this post BW. Very nice. (The smile says it all!)

    Looking forward to a nice fishing trip in Louisiana next month. Can’t wait!

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Watching carolina Go To HELL!
    Quote Originally Posted by accfanfrom1970 View Post
    Sockeye salmon last night. Simple salt, pepper, butter, old bay, lemon. Ymm, seafood. Ymm beer, ardent honey ginger to go with it.
    When we went on our Alaskan cruise 3 years ago, we bought fresh frozen salmon in Ketchican (10 pounds for about $200, including shipping)and they shipped it to Greensboro after we got home (didn't want the cooler they shipped it in to sit on our porch for a week...). We re-ordered when that 10 pounds ran out. We only buy Wild Alaskan salmon, non of the farmed stuff for us. And now we buy it at Costco for about 1/3 the price and it tastes just as good!

    Someone mentioned monk fish upstream (yuk yuk yuk!). It tastes like lobster! I love that stuff!
    Ozzie, your paradigm of optimism!

    Go To Hell carolina, Go To Hell!
    9F 9F 9F
    http://www.EGLEW.com


  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    I canít tell you how much I enjoyed each and every aspect of this post BW. Very nice. (The smile says it all!)

    Looking forward to a nice fishing trip in Louisiana next month. Canít wait!
    Agreed. These are great photos and accompanying descriptions.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Winston’Salem
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    I canít tell you how much I enjoyed each and every aspect of this post BW. Very nice. (The smile says it all!)

    Looking forward to a nice fishing trip in Louisiana next month. Canít wait!
    Only thing missing are the details about the wine. Ymm, Wine!
    "Amazing what a minute can do."

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Correct side of the Durham/CH border
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Shrimp and grits. My wife has a restaurant quality recipe. She gets a few red/cayenne pepper flakes during cooking; I get a few splashes of Texas Pete on my portion. An IPA/IIPA works here, too.
    One awesome trick I learned many moons ago is to cook the grits with broth or stock. Ymm, shrimp and grits.
    ďCoach said no 3s.Ē - Zion on The Block

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santa Cruz CA
    Quote Originally Posted by Tripping William View Post
    Only thing missing are the details about the wine. Ymm, Wine!
    Well the one in the pic is Fogscape 2018 Pinot Noir (Arroyo Seco), which is in Monterey County 60 miles south of here. 86 points on Wine Enthusiast.
    Wine Enthusiast says:
    "Struck slate, smashed stone and light cranberry aromas show on the nose of this bottling. There is a prominent wet clay minerality on the palate, with tart red fruit and crushed slate as well."

    Been a long time since I had clay or stones in my mouth, but when I drank it, that wasn't what came to mind.
    Pretty smooth stuff. I'm not a fancy wine describer but I like it.

    Showed up at the wine sale at my Grocery Outlet. $6.99 less 20%, so I picked up a case of it the next day.

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