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  1. #81
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by OZZIE4DUKE View Post
    I got a call from Cone Health! V-me day is February 4th!
    Awesome! I knew yours had to be soon. You were due!

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I got the notice for my first shot on Thursday, the 4th. I guess I should feel special. I'll be getting mine in a drive through at a parking garage.

    When I went to the dentist last week, I found out that my dentist had just gotten his in a goat barn, and the hygienist got hers in a pig barn.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by jtelander View Post
    If I may ask, why do you believe he is being too pessimistic?
    When I saw Osterholm last, he was saying that there would be far worst times ahead. His reasoning was exclusively because of the unknowns around the variants on COVID-19 -- now and future. He was pessimistic two months ago -- and correctly so -- and his reasons were "winter" and "family gatherings." He was right then. I think he is wrong now.

    The vaccines are roaring ahead and will be effective in protecting individuals from infection and, even more importantly, reducing the number of infections dramatically. In terms of the variants, the existing vaccines will have some level of effectiveness and the vaccine suppliers will engineer new vaccines, or boosters, against the variants. I am rather hopeful.

    The problem I have with unnecessary or inaccurate "gloom and doom" is that it feeds the view that nothing can be done -- so, why try?

    I have a similar view with respect to the stated opinions that, even if you have received both injections (which I have), you will have to take exactly the same precautions and experience the same degree of isolation as before. I'm a social scientist, not a medical doctor or expert, but that is just d-u-m-b. If one is one-twentieth as likely to get an infection and any infection is almost certain to be mild, then the directions on individual conduct can't be "no change." And, again, you are discouraging people from getting the vaccines, which is the most powerful public health set of actions, because "why bother?"
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  4. #84
    Iím getting my first shot tomorrow, unsure which brand. I once was very allergic (emergency hospital visit saved my life) to bees, wasps, and fire ants, but took allergy shots to substantially improve my immunity. I assume thereís no correlation, but does anyone know a reason why I should be more concerned than others?

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    I’m getting my first shot tomorrow, unsure which brand. I once was very allergic (emergency hospital visit saved my life) to bees, wasps, and fire ants, but took allergy shots to substantially improve my immunity. I assume there’s no correlation, but does anyone know a reason why I should be more concerned than others?
    Because it's "you," not "others?"

    There's usually a 15-minute wait to see if there's a reaction, just like for allergy shots. If you're having the shots done at a medical facility, like a hospital, then that is a high degree of protection.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Because it's "you," not "others?"
    Fair enough, I should have asked.... Are people with bee, wasp, and fire ant allergies known to have any issues with these shots?

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    Fair enough, I should have asked... Are people with bee, wasp, and fire ant allergies known to have any issues with these shots?
    From the Healthline web site:
    A small number of people have experienced an allergic reaction soon after receiving their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

    But the risk is low: only about 1 in 100,000 people experience an allergic reaction after getting the injection.
    Those are good odds.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    From the Healthline web site:


    Those are good odds.
    Great odds, much thanks!

    Sounds like Iím more likely to catch COVID waiting in the long line, which is expected.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    I’m getting my first shot tomorrow, unsure which brand. I once was very allergic (emergency hospital visit saved my life) to bees, wasps, and fire ants, but took allergy shots to substantially improve my immunity. I assume there’s no correlation, but does anyone know a reason why I should be more concerned than others?
    You should just let them know that before you get your vax. They might ask you to wait for 30 minutes after rather than 15 minutes after. If you carry your own epi pen, you should bring it with you. It sounds like you probably don't, so no worries they will have them there in the very unlikely event you need it.

    As you said, very good odds. I'm sure the Vax would still be recommended and is not contraindicated for you.

    If someone has had true anaphylactic reactions to other vaccines, I believe that could be a problem. Or for folks who have anaphylaxis to many things and carry their own epi-pen, that is a concern.

    Folks with shellfish allergies or bee-allergies, etc. are at slightly higher risk, but as you noted, the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks.

    hope that helps

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    raleigh
    got mine in orange county a week ago...zero side effects....

    of course, i've inherited my mom's southern constitution...i can eat an egg salad sandwich that's been left outside in the sun all day and wash it down with milk that's been left beside it and not have any problems...
    "Either they're going down, or we are! Kirk out!"

  11. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by richardjackson199 View Post
    You should just let them know that before you get your vax. They might ask you to wait for 30 minutes after rather than 15 minutes after. If you carry your own epi pen, you should bring it with you. It sounds like you probably don't, so no worries they will have them there in the very unlikely event you need it.

    As you said, very good odds. I'm sure the Vax would still be recommended and is not contraindicated for you.

    If someone has had true anaphylactic reactions to other vaccines, I believe that could be a problem. Or for folks who have anaphylaxis to many things and carry their own epi-pen, that is a concern.

    Folks with shellfish allergies or bee-allergies, etc. are at slightly higher risk, but as you noted, the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks.

    hope that helps
    Yes, thanks, itís most appreciated!

    Youíre correct, I donít have an epi-pen. Iíll stay at the facility, until Iím sure Iím alright.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    When I saw Osterholm last, he was saying that there would be far worst times ahead. His reasoning was exclusively because of the unknowns around the variants on COVID-19 -- now and future. He was pessimistic two months ago -- and correctly so -- and his reasons were "winter" and "family gatherings." He was right then. I think he is wrong now.

    The vaccines are roaring ahead and will be effective in protecting individuals from infection and, even more importantly, reducing the number of infections dramatically. In terms of the variants, the existing vaccines will have some level of effectiveness and the vaccine suppliers will engineer new vaccines, or boosters, against the variants. I am rather hopeful.

    The problem I have with unnecessary or inaccurate "gloom and doom" is that it feeds the view that nothing can be done -- so, why try?

    I have a similar view with respect to the stated opinions that, even if you have received both injections (which I have), you will have to take exactly the same precautions and experience the same degree of isolation as before. I'm a social scientist, not a medical doctor or expert, but that is just d-u-m-b. If one is one-twentieth as likely to get an infection and any infection is almost certain to be mild, then the directions on individual conduct can't be "no change." And, again, you are discouraging people from getting the vaccines, which is the most powerful public health set of actions, because "why bother?"
    I agree, to a certain extent, that telling people that "nothing changes" after getting vaccinated could be a serious disincentive to vaccination, which is exactly what we don't want.

    I am fully vaccinated and it has been three weeks since my second shot, so I'm as protected right now as I'm ever going to be. I am still wearing a mask in public spaces at all times, not to protect myself or others, but in order not to make other people uncomfortable and to not make them think that I'm a jerk. Nobody at the grocery store knows that I am fully vaccinated, so if I go in there without a mask, some people will think I'm a selfish you-know-what, and others will feel incredibly uncomfortable seeing me walk around without a mask. I don't want either of those outcomes, so I am continuing as though I haven't had the shot.

    To be honest, it's really, really hard to change thinking that I have now hardwired into my brain over the past 11 months or so. As an example, I had some packages to mail on Saturday and then I told my wife I'd do the grocery shopping on my way home (makes sense since I'm vaccinated and she is not). Well, there were WAY too many people at the post office and I had to stand in line for WAY too long (completely broke all the governor's rules and was, frankly, not safe). My initial thought when looking in there was, "I can mail this stuff off another day" before I remembered that it was OK for me to stand in that line. Same goes for the grocery store. The parking lot was pretty full, and when I walked in I saw a TON of customers. Previously, I would have left and come back at a different time. If I didn't have that option I would have raced through the store, attempting to get out within 5 or 6 minutes to limit my time. All those types of thoughts kept racing through my head, and I had to consciously keep reminding myself that things are different now.

    It has been interesting, waging this battle inside my head with my rational brain trying to tell my reactionary brain that things have changed.
    "We are not provided with wisdom, we must discover it for ourselves, after a journey through the wilderness which no one else can take for us, an effort which no one can spare us, for our wisdom is the point of view from which we come at last to regard the world." --M. Proust

  13. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I agree, to a certain extent, that telling people that "nothing changes" after getting vaccinated could be a serious disincentive to vaccination, which is exactly what we don't want.

    I am fully vaccinated and it has been three weeks since my second shot, so I'm as protected right now as I'm ever going to be. I am still wearing a mask in public spaces at all times, not to protect myself or others, but in order not to make other people uncomfortable and to not make them think that I'm a jerk. Nobody at the grocery store knows that I am fully vaccinated, so if I go in there without a mask, some people will think I'm a selfish you-know-what, and others will feel incredibly uncomfortable seeing me walk around without a mask. I don't want either of those outcomes, so I am continuing as though I haven't had the shot.

    To be honest, it's really, really hard to change thinking that I have now hardwired into my brain over the past 11 months or so. As an example, I had some packages to mail on Saturday and then I told my wife I'd do the grocery shopping on my way home (makes sense since I'm vaccinated and she is not). Well, there were WAY too many people at the post office and I had to stand in line for WAY too long (completely broke all the governor's rules and was, frankly, not safe). My initial thought when looking in there was, "I can mail this stuff off another day" before I remembered that it was OK for me to stand in that line. Same goes for the grocery store. The parking lot was pretty full, and when I walked in I saw a TON of customers. Previously, I would have left and come back at a different time. If I didn't have that option I would have raced through the store, attempting to get out within 5 or 6 minutes to limit my time. All those types of thoughts kept racing through my head, and I had to consciously keep reminding myself that things are different now.

    It has been interesting, waging this battle inside my head with my rational brain trying to tell my reactionary brain that things have changed.
    This makes sense to me and I plan to do the same.
    Another consideration for me is the possibility that after vaccination, I may be positive and contagious but asymptomatic. Wearing a mask protects my fellow citizens from that possibility. That hasn't changed.

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I agree, to a certain extent, that telling people that "nothing changes" after getting vaccinated could be a serious disincentive to vaccination, which is exactly what we don't want.

    I am fully vaccinated and it has been three weeks since my second shot, so I'm as protected right now as I'm ever going to be. I am still wearing a mask in public spaces at all times, not to protect myself or others, but in order not to make other people uncomfortable and to not make them think that I'm a jerk. Nobody at the grocery store knows that I am fully vaccinated, so if I go in there without a mask, some people will think I'm a selfish you-know-what, and others will feel incredibly uncomfortable seeing me walk around without a mask. I don't want either of those outcomes, so I am continuing as though I haven't had the shot.

    To be honest, it's really, really hard to change thinking that I have now hardwired into my brain over the past 11 months or so. As an example, I had some packages to mail on Saturday and then I told my wife I'd do the grocery shopping on my way home (makes sense since I'm vaccinated and she is not). Well, there were WAY too many people at the post office and I had to stand in line for WAY too long (completely broke all the governor's rules and was, frankly, not safe). My initial thought when looking in there was, "I can mail this stuff off another day" before I remembered that it was OK for me to stand in that line. Same goes for the grocery store. The parking lot was pretty full, and when I walked in I saw a TON of customers. Previously, I would have left and come back at a different time. If I didn't have that option I would have raced through the store, attempting to get out within 5 or 6 minutes to limit my time. All those types of thoughts kept racing through my head, and I had to consciously keep reminding myself that things are different now.

    It has been interesting, waging this battle inside my head with my rational brain trying to tell my reactionary brain that things have changed.
    I'm having the same thought patterns and looking at a plan where, after 13 months, I will actually see my children and grandchildren. Gotta be a way -- and, of course, they would have to be willing.

    I'm especially OK on wearing a mask. It's a social signal.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I agree, to a certain extent, that telling people that "nothing changes" after getting vaccinated could be a serious disincentive to vaccination, which is exactly what we don't want.

    I am fully vaccinated and it has been three weeks since my second shot, so I'm as protected right now as I'm ever going to be. I am still wearing a mask in public spaces at all times, not to protect myself or others, but in order not to make other people uncomfortable and to not make them think that I'm a jerk. Nobody at the grocery store knows that I am fully vaccinated, so if I go in there without a mask, some people will think I'm a selfish you-know-what, and others will feel incredibly uncomfortable seeing me walk around without a mask. I don't want either of those outcomes, so I am continuing as though I haven't had the shot.

    To be honest, it's really, really hard to change thinking that I have now hardwired into my brain over the past 11 months or so. As an example, I had some packages to mail on Saturday and then I told my wife I'd do the grocery shopping on my way home (makes sense since I'm vaccinated and she is not). Well, there were WAY too many people at the post office and I had to stand in line for WAY too long (completely broke all the governor's rules and was, frankly, not safe). My initial thought when looking in there was, "I can mail this stuff off another day" before I remembered that it was OK for me to stand in that line. Same goes for the grocery store. The parking lot was pretty full, and when I walked in I saw a TON of customers. Previously, I would have left and come back at a different time. If I didn't have that option I would have raced through the store, attempting to get out within 5 or 6 minutes to limit my time. All those types of thoughts kept racing through my head, and I had to consciously keep reminding myself that things are different now.

    It has been interesting, waging this battle inside my head with my rational brain trying to tell my reactionary brain that things have changed.
    Re-assuring to read this and support my belief I'm not paranoid/"overly" cautious. Somewhat similar experience for me on Saturday with an outdoor family funeral. "Immediate" family only with 18 attendees all masked (some double masked) and mostly 6 feet apart. Those who spoke/sang did so with masks, again 6+ feet away from the other nearest person. Only close contact was 2-3 feet away from the widow, wrapped in blankets, hooded and masked, with some vaccinated fully, some with one shot and some not yet. I was comfortable with this. Where I became uncomfortable was the indoor gathering afterwards (15 people with some food after I left),often <6 feet and sometimes 8-10 people in the same 15x20 room with me always standing in another room. Mrs. dd (BSN, MSN, RN) asked why I was so "stand-offish," even having had 2 shots. Whaaaaaa? We have 2 MD children, both with 2 shots each and they were glad they avoided the gathering and agreed that it was not unreasonable for me to feel at least somewhat uncomfortable and leave early.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I agree, to a certain extent, that telling people that "nothing changes" after getting vaccinated could be a serious disincentive to vaccination, which is exactly what we don't want.

    I am fully vaccinated and it has been three weeks since my second shot, so I'm as protected right now as I'm ever going to be. I am still wearing a mask in public spaces at all times, not to protect myself or others, but in order not to make other people uncomfortable and to not make them think that I'm a jerk. Nobody at the grocery store knows that I am fully vaccinated, so if I go in there without a mask, some people will think I'm a selfish you-know-what, and others will feel incredibly uncomfortable seeing me walk around without a mask. I don't want either of those outcomes, so I am continuing as though I haven't had the shot.

    To be honest, it's really, really hard to change thinking that I have now hardwired into my brain over the past 11 months or so. As an example, I had some packages to mail on Saturday and then I told my wife I'd do the grocery shopping on my way home (makes sense since I'm vaccinated and she is not). Well, there were WAY too many people at the post office and I had to stand in line for WAY too long (completely broke all the governor's rules and was, frankly, not safe). My initial thought when looking in there was, "I can mail this stuff off another day" before I remembered that it was OK for me to stand in that line. Same goes for the grocery store. The parking lot was pretty full, and when I walked in I saw a TON of customers. Previously, I would have left and come back at a different time. If I didn't have that option I would have raced through the store, attempting to get out within 5 or 6 minutes to limit my time. All those types of thoughts kept racing through my head, and I had to consciously keep reminding myself that things are different now.

    It has been interesting, waging this battle inside my head with my rational brain trying to tell my reactionary brain that things have changed.
    Just seeing how low the flu cases are this year makes me want to wear a mask a while longer anyway. And maybe next flu season. I used to snicker at the Asian Duke students who wore masks pre-COVID. No more.

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Sea Island, GA
    Got my second shot this morning at 8:30, and so far no reactions. Even my arm is only a little sore. Fingers crossed that I havenít just jinxed myself.

    The Health Department was well organized like last time, only now they seem to be churning through 4x the number of people. In and out within 25í, including the 15í monitoring period.

  18. #98
    I have to say, I'm getting f'ing annoyed at some of these stories about what you can and cannot do once you are vaccinated.

    Like, there is a story on CNN right now about it. And the first thing they say is that the vaccine isn't 100 percent proof, so you should still wear a mask.

    Well, yeah, no kidding. The flu vaccine isn't either. Is the argument really going to be that everyone wears a mask all the time forever now, because the vaccine will never be 100% protection?

    They also say "Well, not everyone's body will react to the vaccine the same way."

    Again, no kidding. So... everyone will wear masks forever?

    Then they talk about seeing someone who is fully vaccinated unmasked inside and say "Oh, well, there is risk."

    Wait... there is risk if both of you are fully vaccinated? Sure. But that risk will basically ALWAYS exist, so again, unless you are arguing for masks forever...

    I get that the media has to be cautious because people are idiots. I also get that, until LOTS more people get the vaccine, it will be "out there" more.

    But man, some of these things about what to do once you are vaccinated... they seem over the top.

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    I know I'm not pleased if I go in a store and find unmasked people, so as long as the epidemic is revved up, I plan on wearing a mask, otherwise how do others know I've been vaccinated? Should I wear a badge?

    It doesn't seem like a big deal to literally keep up appearances until the threat subsides substantially (whenever that may be).

    Of course, I don't have a jab yet, so this is all theoretical...

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    I know I'm not pleased if I go in a store and find unmasked people, so as long as the epidemic is revved up, I plan on wearing a mask, otherwise how do others know I've been vaccinated? Should I wear a badge?

    It doesn't seem like a big deal to literally keep up appearances until the threat subsides substantially (whenever that may be).

    Of course, I don't have a jab yet, so this is all theoretical...
    Maybe a big Scarlet V on your chest!
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

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