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  1. #61
    The NFL could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any other sport.

    The NBA could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any sport other than American football.

    No other sport has athletes that could compete at the collegiate level in basketball or American football.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by niveklaen View Post
    The NFL could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any other sport.

    The NBA could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any sport other than American football.

    No other sport has athletes that could compete at the collegiate level in basketball or American football.
    I don't think a group of NFLers would be competitive at the collegiate level in "any other sport." You think these guys would be at D1 level against other swimming and diving teams?! I'd like to watch that!

    Having said that, I don't think that's the case for any set of athletes. There is too much specificity in skillsets/training/body types.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    I moved. Now 12 miles from Heaven, 13 from Hell
    Those of a certain age will remember ABC’s Superstars competition. (Later broadcast by CBS and NBC.). Given that I don’t think basketball or hockey players could participate given it was typically held during their seasons, but out of 28 seasons, 13 were won by a football player.

    Not conclusive by any means, but another data point to consider.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by niveklaen View Post
    The NFL could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any other sport.

    The NBA could field a team that with a year of sport specific training could be very competitive at the collegiate level in any sport other than American football.

    No other sport has athletes that could compete at the collegiate level in basketball or American football.
    Pardon, but how many NFLers could hit a curve ball? Maybe one percent? How many could pitch 90+ hour fastballs and control a breaking pitch. One percent? This is ridiculous.

    None of these guys could compete in tennis, swimming, diving, soccer.

    NBA? Same objections. You might get a few pitchers out of the NBA -- thinking of old-timers Gene Conley and Dave DeBusschere. A year of sport-specific training. Did you ever hear of the 10,000-hour rule?
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    I moved. Now 12 miles from Heaven, 13 from Hell
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Pardon, but how many NFLers could hit a curve ball? Maybe one percent? How many could pitch 90+ hour fastballs and control a breaking pitch. One percent? This is ridiculous.

    None of these guys could compete in tennis, swimming, diving, soccer.

    NBA? Same objections. You might get a few pitchers out of the NBA -- thinking of old-timers Gene Conley and Dave DeBusschere. A year of sport-specific training. Did you ever hear of the 10,000-hour rule?
    I’d expect you’d find quite a few football and basketball players who were top high school baseball players. Multi-sport athletes at that level are not uncommon. With enough time (a year’s probably reasonable) they’d be close to the level of college players.

  6. #66
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    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by DU82 View Post
    I’d expect you’d find quite a few football and basketball players who were top high school baseball players. Multi-sport athletes at that level are not uncommon. With enough time (a year’s probably reasonable) they’d be close to the level of college players.
    How'd Michael Jordan do? Major League baseball is hard -- that's why there are minor leagues, and why the advance to "the Bigs" is slow and uncertain, even for college and HS stars. I think the 10,000-hour rule probably applies. And that's more than one year. I'd consider an exception for pitchers (height helps). And, there are people out there with the vision to hit a fastball and pick up a breaking ball -- if naturals, they could become outfielders, I suspect. I happen to think that other pro athletes are no more likely than the general population to have the vision and coordination necessary to hit a baseball -- this ain't running and jumping. But if they have that "vision and coordination" they'd hit the ball a lot farther.

    And then lets talk about golf. Hockey players are known for being good golfers. All pro athletes play some golf -- or a lot of golf. I don't hear about any of them joining the pro tour. Except John Brodie, the long ago 49er QB -- who played on the PGA Senior Tour. But maybe I am missing someone.

    Oh, and by the way, if a football player truly was an outstanding baseball prospect, one would likely take that course wouldn't you? Baseball careers, once people get to the major Leagues, are a lot longer than NFL careers. But, then there's that catch -- football success is more likely than baseball success, given equal levels of HS talent.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    How'd Michael Jordan do? Major League baseball is hard -- that's why there are minor leagues, and why the advance to "the Bigs" is slow and uncertain, even for college and HS stars. I think the 10,000-hour rule probably applies. And that's more than one year. I'd consider an exception for pitchers (height helps). And, there are people out there with the vision to hit a fastball and pick up a breaking ball -- if naturals, they could become outfielders, I suspect. I happen to think that other pro athletes are no more likely than the general population to have the vision and coordination necessary to hit a baseball -- this ain't running and jumping. But if they have that "vision and coordination" they'd hit the ball a lot farther.

    And then lets talk about golf. Hockey players are known for being good golfers. All pro athletes play some golf -- or a lot of golf. I don't hear about any of them joining the pro tour. Except John Brodie, the long ago 49er QB -- who played on the PGA Senior Tour. But maybe I am missing someone.

    Oh, and by the way, if a football player truly was an outstanding baseball prospect, one would likely take that course wouldn't you? Baseball careers, once people get to the major Leagues, are a lot longer than NFL careers. But, then there's that catch -- football success is more likely than baseball success, given equal levels of HS talent.
    The most notable recent example goes against this though - Kyler Murray was an elite level baseball prospect who chose football. Russell Wilson too. And then the two most famous examples are HOF level football players who played baseball as well in Bo Jackson and Dieon Sanders.

    On average you are probably right - the average NFL player probably wouldn’t be a good baseball player, but of the 1700 NFL players I think you could find a pretty good 25 man roster there.

    For other sports, I bet some baseball players could find spots in the nfl at QB or WR positions but probably nothing else; we know some basketball players make good TEs and DEs, but I doubt we could fill an NFL roster from any other sport due to the unique size requirements of NFL players. Same with NBA - while there are likely good basketball players in the NFL or MLB, not enough size to fill an NBA roster. None of this is to say baseball is “less athletic” - I think it takes tremendous explosive ability to throw a ball 90+ mph or hit a ball with 100+ mph exit velocity, but the physical requirements are not as unique as the NFL or NBA.

    As for golf, the best from other sports are Curry, Romo, and Smoltz, so one from each of the big 3 US sports.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkirsh View Post
    The most notable recent example goes against this though - Kyler Murray was an elite level baseball prospect who chose football. Russell Wilson too. And then the two most famous examples are HOF level football players who played baseball as well in Bo Jackson and Dieon Sanders.

    On average you are probably right - the average NFL player probably wouldn’t be a good baseball player, but of the 1700 NFL players I think you could find a pretty good 25 man roster there.

    For other sports, I bet some baseball players could find spots in the nfl at QB or WR positions but probably nothing else; we know some basketball players make good TEs and DEs, but I doubt we could fill an NFL roster from any other sport due to the unique size requirements of NFL players. Same with NBA - while there are likely good basketball players in the NFL or MLB, not enough size to fill an NBA roster. None of this is to say baseball is “less athletic” - I think it takes tremendous explosive ability to throw a ball 90+ mph or hit a ball with 100+ mph exit velocity, but the physical requirements are not as unique as the NFL or NBA.

    As for golf, the best from other sports are Curry, Romo, and Smoltz, so one from each of the big 3 US sports.
    Well, QB's are miles apart in position requirements from other football players.

    I don't want to be argumentative, but Curry, Romo and Smoltz aren't at all competitive against tour golfers.

    Anyway, I have made my points, and will accept the fact that they are found wanting.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  9. #69
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    Feb 2007
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    Walnut Creek, California
    What!! No Dave Sime reference?

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Winston Salem, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    How'd Michael Jordan do? Major League baseball is hard -- that's why there are minor leagues, and why the advance to "the Bigs" is slow and uncertain, even for college and HS stars. I think the 10,000-hour rule probably applies. And that's more than one year. I'd consider an exception for pitchers (height helps). And, there are people out there with the vision to hit a fastball and pick up a breaking ball -- if naturals, they could become outfielders, I suspect. I happen to think that other pro athletes are no more likely than the general population to have the vision and coordination necessary to hit a baseball -- this ain't running and jumping. But if they have that "vision and coordination" they'd hit the ball a lot farther.

    And then lets talk about golf. Hockey players are known for being good golfers. All pro athletes play some golf -- or a lot of golf. I don't hear about any of them joining the pro tour. Except John Brodie, the long ago 49er QB -- who played on the PGA Senior Tour. But maybe I am missing someone.

    Oh, and by the way, if a football player truly was an outstanding baseball prospect, one would likely take that course wouldn't you? Baseball careers, once people get to the major Leagues, are a lot longer than NFL careers. But, then there's that catch -- football success is more likely than baseball success, given equal levels of HS talent.
    And baseball pays much more than the NFL. Well for those that are real good at it. When you think about it, a baseball player that's successful in getting 3 hits in 10 at bats is considered a very good player. If a QB completes 3 passes in 10 attempts, he's shown the door. Then you have golf. Look at how hard it is to hit a ball that's not moving and make it go where you want it to go. I know golfers are not considered athletic but golf is sure a hard game.

    Fore!

  11. #71
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    Feb 2007
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    Greenville, SC
    Quote Originally Posted by jv001 View Post
    And baseball pays much more than the NFL. Well for those that are real good at it. When you think about it, a baseball player that's successful in getting 3 hits in 10 at bats is considered a very good player. If a QB completes 3 passes in 10 attempts, he's shown the door. Then you have golf. Look at how hard it is to hit a ball that's not moving and make it go where you want it to go. I know golfers are not considered athletic but golf is sure a hard game.

    Fore!
    A quote I saw: When you think about it, the ultimate aim in golf is to play the least golf possible.

  12. #72
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    Nov 2007
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    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by jv001 View Post
    And baseball pays much more than the NFL. Well for those that are real good at it. When you think about it, a baseball player that's successful in getting 3 hits in 10 at bats is considered a very good player. If a QB completes 3 passes in 10 attempts, he's shown the door. Then you have golf. Look at how hard it is to hit a ball that's not moving and make it go where you want it to go. I know golfers are not considered athletic but golf is sure a hard game.

    Fore!
    Is that factoring in endorsement money, and is it looking at average pay across positions? Most of the high profile dual-sport athletes recently have been QBs, who make a lot more money than the other positions, and also probably stand to pick up more high paying endorsements.

  13. #73
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    Feb 2007
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    NC
    Apologies if I've missed it, but I would suggest that gymnasts need to be in the discussion if we're expanding beyond the "big 4" US sports. They are phenomenal athletes, albeit very short ones.

  14. #74
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    Jan 2010
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    Outside Philly
    After much deliberation, I’d like to add frisbee golf to the discussion. Frolfers are stunning to behold.

  15. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    After much deliberation, I’d like to add frisbee golf to the discussion. Frolfers are stunning to behold.
    Well that's just like, your opinion, man.

  16. #76
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    Dec 2009
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    North of Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    After much deliberation, I’d like to add frisbee golf to the discussion. Frolfers are stunning to behold.
    I played several rounds of frisbee golf this summer while on vacation and it was pretty tough. Then about a month ago I randomly came across a pro frisbee golf championship on TV (yes, I need a life). It was actually quite impressive as they play on a course with a lot of trees and narrow pathways - the players all have their own set of frisbees and use different ones for long throws, short throws, etc.

    That being said, the skills required are definitely not transferable to many other sports. I would like to give a shoutout to ultimate frisbee. Probably not the best athletes out there, but it does involve speed, endurance, jumping ability, precision in throwing and catching the frisbee, etc.

  17. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyNotCrazie View Post
    I played several rounds of frisbee golf this summer while on vacation and it was pretty tough. Then about a month ago I randomly came across a pro frisbee golf championship on TV (yes, I need a life). It was actually quite impressive as they play on a course with a lot of trees and narrow pathways - the players all have their own set of frisbees and use different ones for long throws, short throws, etc.

    That being said, the skills required are definitely not transferable to many other sports. I would like to give a shoutout to ultimate frisbee. Probably not the best athletes out there, but it does involve speed, endurance, jumping ability, precision in throwing and catching the frisbee, etc.
    I'm much more disc golf than ultimate. Probably because of that whole "running and jumping' thing.

  18. #78
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    Feb 2007
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    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by camion View Post
    A quote I saw: When you think about it, the ultimate aim in golf is to play the least golf possible.
    Oh man, but those practice routines are endless. You practice the most to play the least?
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    Well that's just like, your opinion, man.
    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyNotCrazie View Post
    I played several rounds of frisbee golf this summer while on vacation and it was pretty tough. Then about a month ago I randomly came across a pro frisbee golf championship on TV (yes, I need a life). It was actually quite impressive as they play on a course with a lot of trees and narrow pathways - the players all have their own set of frisbees and use different ones for long throws, short throws, etc.

    That being said, the skills required are definitely not transferable to many other sports. I would like to give a shoutout to ultimate frisbee. Probably not the best athletes out there, but it does involve speed, endurance, jumping ability, precision in throwing and catching the frisbee, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    I'm much more disc golf than ultimate. Probably because of that whole "running and jumping' thing.
    It was the only way I was going to get any sport I play these days into this thread! The "pro" frisbee golfers are indeed impressive with their discs.

  20. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    It was the only way I was going to get any sport I play these days into this thread! The "pro" frisbee golfers are indeed impressive with their discs.
    I am in favor of a sport you can play carrying a beer. But I'm not sure I could in good conscience nominate it for the best athletes.

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