Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31

Thread: Bob Gibson-RIP

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by jv001 View Post
    Carlton trade, worst in Cardinal history. Rick Reed, are you kidding me.
    Rick Wise, but still a terrible and “unwise” trade.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    I moved. Now 12 miles from Heaven, 13 from Hell
    Quote Originally Posted by accfanfrom1970 View Post
    Rick Wise, but still a terrible and “unwise” trade.
    A different view.

    They traded a pitcher who they considered a problem, for one a year younger, also coming off an all-star season. Wise gave the Cards two good years, and then was the primary player traded to get Reggie Smith, who immediately gave the Cards two all-star seasons in center.

    This wasn’t Ernie Broglio coming back in return. It looks bad in hindsight because of Carlton’s longevity, but the Cards definitely got value in return.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    Some might suggest Koufax in '65...
    For five years or so Koufax was as good as any pitcher of the post WWII era. But he didn't have take-you-behind-the-woodshed, steal-your-lunch-money-and-dis'-your-mama-vibe. He was a more a clinician dissecting a corpse.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    For five years or so Koufax was as good as any pitcher of the post WWII era. But he didn't have take-you-behind-the-woodshed, steal-your-lunch-money-and-dis'-your-mama-vibe. He was a more a clinician dissecting a corpse.
    Thank you, Jim. I couldn't really figure out how to say that. Koufax was sort of Maddux-like (only even better than Maddux) in that he didn't intimidate batters, he just removed them from the equation.

  5. #25
    I heard that Hank Aaron told a rookie batting against Gibson, “No matter whether he hits you or you get a hit, don’t look at him on the way to first base.”

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    For five years or so Koufax was as good as any pitcher of the post WWII era. But he didn't have take-you-behind-the-woodshed, steal-your-lunch-money-and-dis'-your-mama-vibe. He was a more a clinician dissecting a corpse.
    Quote Originally Posted by Phredd3 View Post
    Thank you, Jim. I couldn't really figure out how to say that. Koufax was sort of Maddux-like (only even better than Maddux) in that he didn't intimidate batters, he just removed them from the equation.
    Kay, I thought the question was best pitching season, not mound demeanor. And I should have said '63. Here is some of what Bill James had to say on the topic:

    Since 1900 there have been only three seasons by a pitcher in which the pitcher had 25 wins, 300 strikeouts, an ERA under 2.50 and a winning percentage of .750.Those three seasons were by Sandy Koufax, 1963, Sandy Koufax, 1965, and Sandy Koufax, 1966.In a recent article I referred to Hal Newhouser in 1946 as having a Sandy Koufax season, meaning that he had almost Koufax-like numbers: 26-9 with 275 strikeouts and a 1.94 ERA.It’s a hell of a year, although actually he misses two of Koufax’ standards, his winning percentage being less than .750 and his strikeouts less than 300.Still . ..a good season


    https://www.billjamesonline.com/clim..._sandy_koufax/
    Last edited by YmoBeThere; 10-07-2020 at 07:46 PM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    RE: Intimidating pitchers.

    It occurs to me that we have omitted perhaps the most intimidating pitcher of his generation, one Don Drysdale. Dig in against the 6'6 Drysdale and he would brush you back into last week. On the mound he was as mean as a junk-yard dog.

    Actually Ryne Duren might have been the most intimidating pitcher of all time. But that's in part because his potent fastball was augmented by the fact that Duren was (A) blind as a bat and (B) frequently hung-over.

    And the original word in question was "fire." Not effectiveness.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    For five years or so Koufax was as good as any pitcher of the post WWII era. But he didn't have take-you-behind-the-woodshed, steal-your-lunch-money-and-dis'-your-mama-vibe. He was a more a clinician dissecting a corpse.
    I used to go see him pitch against the Mets every year, and every time he took the mound you wondered if the Mets would get no-hit. Must have seen him throw several two or three hitters.
    I also got to see him as a wild young pup in 1957 before he and Norm Sherry turned him from a so-called thrower into a marvelous pitcher. Most overpowering guy I ever saw.

    And many of us Duke fans used to see Sandy on a regular basis at the ACC hoop tournament, he often stayed in our hotel...ultra quiet, reserved gentleman.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    I used to go see him pitch against the Mets every year, and every time he took the mound you wondered if the Mets would get no-hit. Must have seen him throw several two or three hitters.
    I also got to see him as a wild young pup in 1957 before he and Norm Sherry turned him from a so-called thrower into a marvelous pitcher. Most overpowering guy I ever saw.

    And many of us Duke fans used to see Sandy on a regular basis at the ACC hoop tournament, he often stayed in our hotel...ultra quiet, reserved gentleman.
    In the early to middle 1960s, when Koufax was at his peak, the Mets were likely to be no-hit by darn well anybody with a pulse.

  10. #30
    Gibson’s last pitch in MLB was hit for a grand slam by Pete LaCock. They faced each other 10 years later at an old timers game and Gibby threw at him. Rest in power.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    I moved. Now 12 miles from Heaven, 13 from Hell
    Quote Originally Posted by bigperm13 View Post
    Gibson’s last pitch in MLB was hit for a grand slam by Pete LaCock. They faced each other 10 years later at an old timers game and Gibby threw at him. Rest in power.
    Gibson did get Don Kessinger to ground out after the grand slam, so not his absolute last pitch. But later Gibson was quoted as saying, “ I knew it was time to retire when Pete LaCock hit that Grand Slam." And the brush-back pitch was typical Gibby.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •