Page 9 of 21 FirstFirst ... 789101119 ... LastLast
Results 161 to 180 of 420
  1. #161
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northwest NC
    Saw a Bald Eagle less than a mile from my house. Pics aren't great as it was out in a field. Great to see them becoming more established. I live in northwest NC and have seen 3 or 4 within an hour of here in the past couple years.

    IMG_2892.jpg
    IMG_2894.jpg
    "The future ain't what it used to be."

  2. #162
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by DUKIECB View Post
    Saw a Bald Eagle less than a mile from my house. Pics aren't great as it was out in a field. Great to see them becoming more established. I live in northwest NC and have seen 3 or 4 within an hour of here in the past couple years.

    IMG_2892.jpg
    IMG_2894.jpg
    I commend you for being outstanding in your field!



    Sorry, couldn't resist. Awesome pics!
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  3. #163
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by DUKIECB View Post
    Saw a Bald Eagle less than a mile from my house. Pics aren't great as it was out in a field. Great to see them becoming more established. I live in northwest NC and have seen 3 or 4 within an hour of here in the past couple years.

    IMG_2892.jpg
    IMG_2894.jpg
    Bald Eagles are one of the great conservation success stories.

  4. #164
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Some good places to see them are High Rock Lake, Badin, Tillery, Jordan, Falls, Lake Brandt, High Point City Lake and Oak Hollow. Many places near the coast.++

  5. #165
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO

    Blad Eagle Population Trend in Colorado

    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Bald Eagles are one of the great conservation success stories.
    Here's the Colorado version: a few years ago there was a local NPR program with an interview with a retired wildlife biologist with the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The federal Interior Department came to him in the mid-1970's and said, we think there can be 30 bald eagle nesting sites in the state of Colorado. He thought to himself, "Gulp. There are maybe three today." Three -- as in one, two, three!

    Today? We completed a Bird Atlas project in 2007-2012 It showed bald eagle nesting and possible nesting in 69 blocks over a five-year survey period. A comparable Atlas project in 1987-1995 showed confirmed or possible nesting in 19 survey blocks -- an increase of 263 percent. The Atlas surveys are far from comprehensive, but very useful in establishing population trends throughout the state. The bald eagles are concentrated in the western part of the state.

    Two key factors IMHO (where the H got snatched away by a great blue heron many years ago): the outlawing of DDT in 1972 and much greater sensitivity in the U.S. population of the importance of protecting our national symbol (i.e., quit shooting them).

    My own observations, but not comprehensive, in my part of the state suggest that the 140 miles of the Yampa River from where I live in the mountains to the Utah border have a bald eagle nest side every 3-5 miles. The bald eagles feast on fish and other aquatic creatures, plus some ducks and scavenging; therefore, their nest sites tend to be on rivers and lakes. In other words, the goal of 30 nesting sights the feds mentioned 45 years ago has been met just in my small part of the state.
    Last edited by sagegrouse; 09-18-2020 at 10:13 AM.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  6. #166
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Here's the Colorado version: a few years ago there was a local NPR program with an interview with a retired wildlife biologist with the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The federal Interior Department came to him in the mid-1970's and said, we think there can be 30 bald eagle nesting sites in the state of Colorado. He thought to himself, "Gulp. There are maybe three today." Three -- as in one, two, three!

    Today? We completed a Bird Atlas project in 2007-2012 It showed bald eagle nesting and possible nesting in 69 blocks over a five-year survey period. A comparable Atlas project in 1987-1995 showed confirmed or possible nesting in 19 survey blocks -- an increase of 263 percent. The Atlas surveys are far from comprehensive, but very useful in establishing population trends throughout the state. The bald eagles are concentrated in the western part of the state.

    Two key factors IMHO (where the H got snatched away by a great blue heron many years ago): the outlawing of DDT in 1972 and much greater sensitivity in the U.S. population of the importance of protecting our national symbol (i.e., quit shooting them).

    My own observations, but not comprehensive, in my part of the state suggest that the 140 miles of the Yampa River from where I live in the mountains to the Utah border have a bald eagle nest side every 3-5 miles. The bald eagles feast on fish and other aquatic creatures, plus some ducks and scavenging; therefore, their nest sites tend to be on rivers and lakes. In other words, the goal of 30 nesting sights the feds mentioned 45 years ago has been met just in my small part of the state.
    I'm very confused/curious. I keep tabs on my very rural hometown in VA, mostly through FB friends. They have found 2 Bald Eagles near there that have been shot. Authorities are offering rewards to try to find out who, of course. My question is - Why? Maybe they were killing some lambs? That's the only reasonable explanation I can come up with.

    If anyone has any other suggestions, I'd be curious to hear them.
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  7. #167
    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    I'm very confused/curious. I keep tabs on my very rural hometown in VA, mostly through FB friends. They have found 2 Bald Eagles near there that have been shot. Authorities are offering rewards to try to find out who, of course. My question is - Why? Maybe they were killing some lambs? That's the only reasonable explanation I can come up with.

    If anyone has any other suggestions, I'd be curious to hear them.
    There might not be a “reasonable explanation”. I’m involved in land conservation and wildlife preservation because I very seldom believe there’s any reasonable explanation for this behavior.

  8. #168
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Here's the Colorado version: a few years ago there was a local NPR program with an interview with a retired wildlife biologist with the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The federal Interior Department came to him in the mid-1970's and said, we think there can be 30 bald eagle nesting sites in the state of Colorado. He thought to himself, "Gulp. There are maybe three today." Three -- as in one, two, three!

    Today? We completed a Bird Atlas project in 2007-2012 It showed bald eagle nesting and possible nesting in 69 blocks over a five-year survey period. A comparable Atlas project in 1987-1995 showed confirmed or possible nesting in 19 survey blocks -- an increase of 263 percent. The Atlas surveys are far from comprehensive, but very useful in establishing population trends throughout the state. The bald eagles are concentrated in the western part of the state.

    Two key factors IMHO (where the H got snatched away by a great blue heron many years ago): the outlawing of DDT in 1972 and much greater sensitivity in the U.S. population of the importance of protecting our national symbol (i.e., quit shooting them).

    My own observations, but not comprehensive, in my part of the state suggest that the 140 miles of the Yampa River from where I live in the mountains to the Utah border have a bald eagle nest side every 3-5 miles. The bald eagles feast on fish and other aquatic creatures, plus some ducks and scavenging; therefore, their nest sites tend to be on rivers and lakes. In other words, the goal of 30 nesting sights the feds mentioned 45 years ago has been met just in my small part of the state.
    Imagine if Franklin had gotten his way with the Turkey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    I'm very confused/curious. I keep tabs on my very rural hometown in VA, mostly through FB friends. They have found 2 Bald Eagles near there that have been shot. Authorities are offering rewards to try to find out who, of course. My question is - Why? Maybe they were killing some lambs? That's the only reasonable explanation I can come up with.

    If anyone has any other suggestions, I'd be curious to hear them.
    There are still farmer/rancher tensions with certain wildlife and plenty of old biases, but sometimes folks just break the law and shoot things they're not supposed to, in ways they're not supposed to, in seasons they're not supposed to. If they catch the perpetrator, s/he could be in for a world of hurt, Bald Eagles are federally protected under several different statutes, I believe.

  9. #169
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    There might not be a “reasonable explanation”. I’m involved in land conservation and wildlife preservation because I very seldom believe there’s any reasonable explanation for this behavior.
    There are definitely people everywhere who will shoot almost anything...my game warden pal tells me tales of arch stupidity.

  10. #170
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    There are definitely people everywhere who will shoot almost anything...my game warden pal tells me tales of arch stupidity.
    I have spoken to illegal raptor killers. The ones I spoke to are Bobwhite quail hunters who believe that killing raptors will increase the population of quail. No doubt, quail populations are in a severe long term decline, and some raptors (I am looking at you Redtails) may have a role in that decline. I am pretty sure that blaming raptors for the decline is an oversimplification, to say the least.

    I am looking at an adult Bald Eagle right at this moment from my riverside Richmond VA office. Seeing an Eagle in any season is a daily occurrence around the James in downtown Richmond. Not far from here the confluence of the James and Appomattox rivers is a notable gathering spot for eagles, especially in winter. The count from a lookout spot there can get you into the teens pretty easily. The increase in Bald Eagle and Osprey populations has been a huge success story.

  11. #171
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by bird View Post
    I have spoken to illegal raptor killers. The ones I spoke to are Bobwhite quail hunters who believe that killing raptors will increase the population of quail. No doubt, quail populations are in a severe long term decline, and some raptors (I am looking at you Redtails) may have a role in that decline. I am pretty sure that blaming raptors for the decline is an oversimplification, to say the least.

    I am looking at an adult Bald Eagle right at this moment from my riverside Richmond VA office. Seeing an Eagle in any season is a daily occurrence around the James in downtown Richmond. Not far from here the confluence of the James and Appomattox rivers is a notable gathering spot for eagles, especially in winter. The count from a lookout spot there can get you into the teens pretty easily. The increase in Bald Eagle and Osprey populations has been a huge success story.
    Judging by your name, I see you have great authority on this subject...perhaps even first person authority?

    Put another way: you’re pecking your replies not typing them, aren’t you?

  12. #172
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Judging by your name, I see you have great authority on this subject...perhaps even first person authority?

    Put another way: you’re pecking your replies not typing them, aren’t you?
    I'm sure that's only after putting them on scratch paper.

  13. #173
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    I'm very confused/curious. I keep tabs on my very rural hometown in VA, mostly through FB friends. They have found 2 Bald Eagles near there that have been shot. Authorities are offering rewards to try to find out who, of course. My question is - Why? Maybe they were killing some lambs? That's the only reasonable explanation I can come up with.

    If anyone has any other suggestions, I'd be curious to hear them.
    It's total B.S. Bald eagles hunt fish, ducks on the water and steal food from other birds (gulls, e.g.). They also scavenge. They're just making up reasons for killing eagles.

    The golden eagles, on the other hand, are natural-born killers. I've seen them dive into a flock of geese in a field. They are not very common anywhere in the East, although I have seen a few in the fall on Delmarva. Golden eagles, around here at least, nest on cliffs and rock outcroppings. (Bald eagles build huge platform nests in trees next to streams, rivers and lakes.) It is painful to say, but golden eagles are the main predators of Sage Grouse.

    When I was living in Maryland, there were complaints from farmers that black vultures were preying on newborn calves and lambs. While much more active than the larger turkey vultures, these reports were also B.S. They were eating the placentas.

    Kindly,
    Sage
    'Back in the day any soaring bird in Texas and elsewhere was a potential target for a ranch hand or cowboy with a rifle. I hope that's not the case now.'

    "Actually there was a huge problem in Argentina with the farmers killing our North American Swainson's hawks, who are ace migrators, believing they were after chickens and other fowl. They were finally educated, I am told, that the Swainsons were eating grasshoppers in the fields and were helpful to farmers."
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  14. #174
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    There might not be a “reasonable explanation”. I’m involved in land conservation and wildlife preservation because I very seldom believe there’s any reasonable explanation for this behavior.
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Imagine if Franklin had gotten his way with the Turkey!



    There are still farmer/rancher tensions with certain wildlife and plenty of old biases, but sometimes folks just break the law and shoot things they're not supposed to, in ways they're not supposed to, in seasons they're not supposed to. If they catch the perpetrator, s/he could be in for a world of hurt, Bald Eagles are federally protected under several different statutes, I believe.
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    There are definitely people everywhere who will shoot almost anything...my game warden pal tells me tales of arch stupidity.
    Quote Originally Posted by bird View Post
    I have spoken to illegal raptor killers. The ones I spoke to are Bobwhite quail hunters who believe that killing raptors will increase the population of quail. No doubt, quail populations are in a severe long term decline, and some raptors (I am looking at you Redtails) may have a role in that decline. I am pretty sure that blaming raptors for the decline is an oversimplification, to say the least.

    I am looking at an adult Bald Eagle right at this moment from my riverside Richmond VA office. Seeing an Eagle in any season is a daily occurrence around the James in downtown Richmond. Not far from here the confluence of the James and Appomattox rivers is a notable gathering spot for eagles, especially in winter. The count from a lookout spot there can get you into the teens pretty easily. The increase in Bald Eagle and Osprey populations has been a huge success story.
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    It's total B.S. Bald eagles hunt fish, ducks on the water and steal food from other birds (gulls, e.g.). They also scavenge. They're just making up reasons for killing eagles.

    The golden eagles, on the other hand, are natural-born killers. I've seen them dive into a flock of geese in a field. They are not very common anywhere in the East, although I have seen a few in the fall on Delmarva. Golden eagles, around here at least, nest on cliffs and rock outcroppings. (Bald eagles build huge platform nests in trees next to streams, rivers and lakes.) It is painful to say, but golden eagles are the main predators of Sage Grouse.

    When I was living in Maryland, there were complaints from farmers that black vultures were preying on newborn calves and lambs. While much more active than the larger turkey vultures, these reports were also B.S. They were eating the placentas.

    Kindly,
    Sage
    'Back in the day any soaring bird in Texas and elsewhere was a potential target for a ranch hand or cowboy with a rifle. I hope that's not the case now.'

    "Actually there was a huge problem in Argentina with the farmers killing our North American Swainson's hawks, who are ace migrators, believing they were after chickens and other fowl. They were finally educated, I am told, that the Swainsons were eating grasshoppers in the fields and were helpful to farmers."
    If I sounded like I might be offering a good excuse for them to shoot an Eagle, I didn't mean to. I was more just curious as to what might have been going through their thick skulls just before pulling the trigger. I grew up there and hunted and fished with the best/worst of 'em and yet I can't fathom. Everything I ever shot ended up on the table and/or in the freezer, except maybe for a groundhog or two that were destroying the garden.
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  15. #175
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    ’Back in the day any soaring bird in Texas and elsewhere was a potential target for a ranch hand or cowboy with a rifle. I hope that's not the case now.'
    Very sorry to report, there are still ranches in Texas, and other US states, where you can hunt almost anything you want for a price. Some losers pay 5 and 6 digits to kill beautiful animals likely to one day be extinct. If only we could arm the endangered animals and make it a fair competition.

  16. #176
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Golden eagles are found in NC, mainly in the mountains, where they are rare. I saw one there in Haywood County back in 2002. Sometimes spotted along the coast in Fall. As for shooting raptors, it is a federal offense.
    Eagles are not the reason for the bobwhite's decline. Cooper's hawks take many, but habitat loss and predators like coyotes and foxes are the main concern. At this time the bobwhite is listed as uncommon to fairly common across the state.

  17. #177
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Eagle_Flying.jpg
    Near my home..male coming to nest.

  18. #178
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by Devilwin View Post
    Golden eagles are found in NC, mainly in the mountains, where they are rare. I saw one there in Haywood County back in 2002. Sometimes spotted along the coast in Fall. As for shooting raptors, it is a federal offense.
    Eagles are not the reason for the bobwhite's decline. Cooper's hawks take many, but habitat loss and predators like coyotes and foxes are the main concern. At this time the bobwhite is listed as uncommon to fairly common across the state.
    Thirty years ago I used to see scores of bobwhites on my Christmas bird counts NW of Wash DC. Then they got scarce -- as in, more turkeys than quail. I thought it was disease, and I thought our population, was in part from game farms in the South.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  19. #179
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    I have at least two coveys here on our land in Davidson County. The eagles nested on my pond for three years til a storm took out their nest.

  20. #180
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Bagged a pileated woodpecker in the Smokies last weekend.
    DSC_4445.jpg
    DSC_4486.jpg
    DSC_4541.jpg

Similar Threads

  1. Deer Feeding Trough In Maine Live Cameras
    By Devilwin in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: 03-18-2020, 05:08 PM
  2. ForThose That Feed The Birds.
    By Devilwin in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-25-2019, 04:57 PM
  3. Feeding the birds in winter.
    By Devilwin in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-20-2018, 09:46 AM
  4. Cheats v dirty birds
    By Fish80 in forum Elizabeth King Forum
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-23-2017, 12:17 AM
  5. Soccer and Angry Birds collide @UNC-Asheville
    By 94duke in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-06-2011, 10:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •