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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    My analogy is that turkeys can fly about like I can run.
    Why hasn't anyone has quoted WKRP, yet?

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    We have a mess of wild turkeys in our neighborhood. They used to be somewhat seasonal, leaving up th mountain in the fall, returning early spring. Their winter escape was turned into new houses, so now they stay year round. Observations over the years:

    The males get extremely aggressive with each other during mating season. I've seen them viscously attack each other to near the point of death.

    Baby turkeys are incredibly cute. They look like fuzzy tennis balls with legs. They are also apparently quite tasty, as their numbers diminish very quickly.

    We had a female roost in our yard one year. She camped near our basement door for several weeks before nine of her ten babies hatched. Watching them waddle around the yard was adorable.

    Big turkeys are amazing to watch fly. They are ungainly and their aim is poor. My analogy is that turkeys can fly about like I can run. I will if someone's chasing me, but it ain't pretty.

    In short bursts of power up to 55 MPH? You sell yourself short, my friend! Sounds like you're all power and ferocity but only for about 20 feet!

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by aimo View Post
    Why hasn't anyone has quoted WKRP, yet?
    For years, the Mary Tyler Moore episode about Chuckles the Clown’s funeral was ranked #1 as the funniest sitcom episode ever.

    For me, it was the WKRP Thanksgiving episode. (although the Chuckles episode is pretty damn funny).
    “That’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    I vote for the Andy Griffith Show's "Loaded Goat" as the funniest. Bet it's the only sitcom episode with an eatery named after it! ( In Mt Airy)

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    ...The males get extremely aggressive with each other during mating season. I've seen them viscously attack each other to near the point of death...
    ...the dreaded syrup bombs?

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Those are great birds...i've seen a few flying around already, quite distinctive.
    Another very interesting water bird is the American Bittern...they'll hang out where there are lots of tall reeds and things, and if they hear you coming, they extend their heads upward and sway with the rhythm of the reeds around them, "I'm invisible."...very cool to watch...,
    They are. Very shy and secretive. I've seen them flying into my norwegian spruces several times now. I don't have a non-phone camera and I just can't get close enough for a picture or even a better look. I think there are 3-4 of them around..lots of croaking certain times of the dry.

    Been a while since I've seen a bittern now that you mention them but, yeah, they're pretty fun birds. They remind of this exchange from Guardians of the Galaxy:

    Drax : I've mastered the ability of standing so incredibly still... that I become invisible to the eye... Watch.
    Peter Quill : You're eating a Zargnut.
    Drax : My movement... is so slow... that it's imperceptible.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    So, there are some green herons hanging around my yard that appear to be back after making a first appearance last year. They're mostly hidden deep in my norway spruce trees. I found them last year when I started hearing a croaking sound I couldn't ID (the first call in the link below). I finally put eyes on one of the birds and was able to figure it out. I don't know if they're nesting and rearing young in my trees but there are several of them that must visit some of the local creeks and low areas.

    Anyway, I just started hearing the telltale croaking a few days ago. Haven't seen one yet but I know they are there!

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/sounds
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Those are great birds...i've seen a few flying around already, quite distinctive.
    Another very interesting water bird is the American Bittern...they'll hang out where there are lots of tall reeds and things, and if they hear you coming, they extend their heads upward and sway with the rhythm of the reeds around them, "I'm invisible."...very cool to watch...,
    Here's a suggestion of another possibility -- the black-crowned night-heron. They are known to be colonial nesters and often pick cedars or other evergreen trees. Green heron nesting is pretty much a single-nest operation near water or marsh. While the male night-heron is a striking black, gray and white, both the female and immature black-crowned night-herons are streaky and spotted and can resemble the green heron.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Here's a suggestion of another possibility -- the black-crowned night-heron. They are known to be colonial nesters and often pick cedars or other evergreen trees. Green heron nesting is pretty much a single-nest operation near water or marsh. While the male night-heron is a striking black, gray and white, both the female and immature black-crowned night-herons are streaky and spotted and can resemble the green heron.
    You know, I did consider that and had been the look out for the male, which as you say is very distinctive. While I still haven't had a pristine, up close look of them, the call/song is a dead giveaway. They're frequently making the first 'song' in the link below which is itself very distinctive.

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/sounds

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    You know, I did consider that and had been the look out for the male, which as you say is very distinctive. While I still haven't had a pristine, up close look of them, the call/song is a dead giveaway. They're frequently making the first 'song' in the link below which is itself very distinctive.

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/sounds
    We aren't in their range, though a number of "ranges" are changing over time...have not seen one up this far (and east) yet...would love to.

  10. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    ...the dreaded syrup bombs?
    I earned that one

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    Here's a suggestion of another possibility -- the black-crowned night-heron. They are known to be colonial nesters and often pick cedars or other evergreen trees. Green heron nesting is pretty much a single-nest operation near water or marsh. While the male night-heron is a striking black, gray and white, both the female and immature black-crowned night-herons are streaky and spotted and can resemble the green heron.
    The black crowned and yellow crowned night heron adult's sexes cannot be told apart by plumage, as they are identical. Young are brown streaked. The only difference is males are slightly more robust.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    We aren't in their range, though a number of "ranges" are changing over time...have not seen one up this far (and east) yet...would love to.
    The black-crowned night-heron has a wide distribution (although not Australia). You have seen the bird, not me, so your judgment is the appropriate test. Here is the distribution from Wikipedia:

    The breeding habitat is fresh and salt-water wetlands throughout much of the world. The subspecies N. n. hoactli breeds in North and South America from Canada as far south as northern Argentina and Chile, ..., and the nominate race ... in Europe, Asia and Africa. Black-crowned night herons nest in colonies on platforms of sticks in a group of trees, or on the ground in protected locations such as islands or reedbeds. Three to eight eggs are laid.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Busted out to a state park over the weekend and caught a pretty good pileated woodpecker shot.
    DSC_3015.jpg

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Huntington Beach SP below Myrtle Beach is a great place to observe night herons. And painted buntings.

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northwest NC
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    Busted out to a state park over the weekend and caught a pretty good pileated woodpecker shot.
    DSC_3015.jpg
    Love Pileated woodpeckers. I have a couple that frequent my lot and it's always exciting to see them. Until you see one close up you have no idea just how big they are. Love to hear them call as well. They are LOUD!
    "The future ain't what it used to be."

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    The black-crowned night-heron has a wide distribution (although not Australia). You have seen the bird, not me, so your judgment is the appropriate test. Here is the distribution from Wikipedia:
    they go to Canada but for some reason my bird book shows they don't get over to VT, they stay west of here..but they're close enough that at some point they probably make a guest apperance...I'm a big fan of herons...some years ago I saw a great blue heron winter here, he hung out in the moving water below a dam (he's lucky it didn't freeze that year)...

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Kayaking over the weekend and got this pic...

    Osprey.jpg
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Nice osprey pic..

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by DUKIECB View Post
    Love Pileated woodpeckers. I have a couple that frequent my lot and it's always exciting to see them. Until you see one close up you have no idea just how big they are. Love to hear them call as well. They are LOUD!
    my wife took a picture of the signature "box" indentation pileateds can make in a tree...it was 4-5 feet high, a foot and a half wide, and easily a foot deep...most impressive...enormous pile of wood chips piled up under the tree...

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Nice to see some bobolinks today...their numbers are diminishing due to excessive cutting of grass areas...there are efforts underway to mow fields less often to let them breed more successfully...the VT Audubon Society has a Bobolink Project, which pays farmers to delay cutting fields. Score one for the bobolinks.

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