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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Thought the birders would be interested in this story. Features DBR's own sagegrouse who I've always assumed is an actual sage grouse.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Thought the birders would be interested in this story. Features DBR's own sagegrouse who I've always assumed is an actual sage grouse.
    Apparently, science's solution to depressingly bad mating seasons is to introduce robot female grouses. Not funny!
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Thought you guys might enjoy this...
    My daughter is naming all the daily birds that come to my feeder after Classic Rock Stars (Yes, she's that bored.)

    The pair of Cardinals - Sonny and Cher
    The Nuthatch and Chickadee - Gene and Ace (the white and black around the eyes/face = KISS)
    The Mourning Doves - Ozzy and Sharon (he had such the rapport with Doves)
    The Tufted Titmouse - Freddie
    She hasn't finalized but she's leaning toward Bowie for the Blue Jay
    She says she's open to suggestions on the Chipping Sparrow and the Hummingbirds.
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    Thought you guys might enjoy this...
    My daughter is naming all the daily birds that come to my feeder after Classic Rock Stars (Yes, she's that bored.)

    The pair of Cardinals - Sonny and Cher
    The Nuthatch and Chickadee - Gene and Ace (the white and black around the eyes/face = KISS)
    The Mourning Doves - Ozzy and Sharon (he had such the rapport with Doves)
    The Tufted Titmouse - Freddie
    She hasn't finalized but she's leaning toward Bowie for the Blue Jay
    She says she's open to suggestions on the Chipping Sparrow and the Hummingbirds.
    She might enjoy this Birdfeeder Bingo game, too. A friend's kids are doing it with their birdfeeders.

    I'd just like a good chart or something to keep track of all the bird's that come to my feeders...if anyone has any suggestions?

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    I just keep a daily log. Gives me something to do now that I am retired.
    Just make entries of each species that shows up on that date.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    ...I'd just like a good chart or something to keep track of all the bird's that come to my feeders...if anyone has any suggestions?
    The Sibley books and laminated charts are good.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Today's 6:30 a.m. surprise when I took the hound out to fetch the newspaper was a big fat wild turkey dropping out of a 70 ft. pine tree next to my driveway...impressive how such a big fat bird can fly that well...still no hummingbirds, two snow events in the past week probably got them to U-turn back to Mexico.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Today's 6:30 a.m. surprise when I took the hound out to fetch the newspaper was a big fat wild turkey dropping out of a 70 ft. pine tree next to my driveway...impressive how such a big fat bird can fly that well...still no hummingbirds, two snow events in the past week probably got them to U-turn back to Mexico.
    My two hummingbirds seemed to disappear during the cold spell but one was back yesterday. Haven't seen what I think was a female in about a week.

    Here's my boy... (not the best pic, lighting wasn't great, but I'm working on it)
    Hummingbird 2.jpg
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Today's 6:30 a.m. surprise when I took the hound out to fetch the newspaper was a big fat wild turkey dropping out of a 70 ft. pine tree next to my driveway...impressive how such a big fat bird can fly that well...still no hummingbirds, two snow events in the past week probably got them to U-turn back to Mexico.
    My sister's new place had 17 turkeys in the backyard last October/beginning of November. Largest count we had - but still multiple wandering through the grass. It's fun to see them and watch the little ones grow.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    My two hummingbirds seemed to disappear during the cold spell but one was back yesterday. Haven't seen what I think was a female in about a week.

    Here's my boy... (not the best pic, lighting wasn't great, but I'm working on it)
    Hummingbird 2.jpg
    That pose looks like what males often do, which is position themselves near a feeder (e.g. on our deck railing) in order to chase others away from the feeder...

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by DukieInKansas View Post
    My sister's new place had 17 turkeys in the backyard last October/beginning of November. Largest count we had - but still multiple wandering through the grass. It's fun to see them and watch the little ones grow.
    They're great fun to watch, they can really scoot...a real success story here, they had to be reintroduced to the state some decades ago with the fear that the winter would be too cold for them (25 below zero not unusual) but they've flourished and now there are 50,000 or so of them running and flying around...

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    That pose looks like what males often do, which is position themselves near a feeder (e.g. on our deck railing) in order to chase others away from the feeder...
    He's been pretty lucky so far, no competition that I've seen. I think I had a female last week and they took turns without much interaction. Couldn't get a good enough look to know for certain. Must do more monitoring! (sitting on the deck with camera in one hand and beer in the other)
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Summerville ,S.C.
    We had set up a 2x2 piece of plywood on a 4x4 6ft up.we used to feed the birds on.
    My lab never bothered them.
    But what i believe is a coopers hawk set up shop.felt like i was baiting them for death.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by wavedukefan70s View Post
    We had set up a 2x2 piece of plywood on a 4x4 6ft up.we used to feed the birds on.
    My lab never bothered them.
    But what i believe is a coopers hawk set up shop.felt like i was baiting them for death.
    About ten years ago we had a big feeder up and a cooper hawk took a run at a bird but crashed into the living room window, most unfortunate...absolutely gorgeous (but dead) bird...

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    So, there are some green herons hanging around my yard that appear to be back after making a first appearance last year. They're mostly hidden deep in my norway spruce trees. I found them last year when I started hearing a croaking sound I couldn't ID (the first call in the link below). I finally put eyes on one of the birds and was able to figure it out. I don't know if they're nesting and rearing young in my trees but there are several of them that must visit some of the local creeks and low areas.

    Anyway, I just started hearing the telltale croaking a few days ago. Haven't seen one yet but I know they are there!

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/sounds

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    So, there are some green herons hanging around my yard that appear to be back after making a first appearance last year. They're mostly hidden deep in my norway spruce trees. I found them last year when I started hearing a croaking sound I couldn't ID (the first call in the link below). I finally put eyes on one of the birds and was able to figure it out. I don't know if they're nesting and rearing young in my trees but there are several of them that must visit some of the local creeks and low areas.

    Anyway, I just started hearing the telltale croaking a few days ago. Haven't seen one yet but I know they are there!

    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/sounds
    Those are great birds...i've seen a few flying around already, quite distinctive.
    Another very interesting water bird is the American Bittern...they'll hang out where there are lots of tall reeds and things, and if they hear you coming, they extend their heads upward and sway with the rhythm of the reeds around them, "I'm invisible."...very cool to watch...,

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    This guy was on my parents' front porch a long time ago (35 mm film camera).

    tom turkey.jpg

  18. #78
    We have a mess of wild turkeys in our neighborhood. They used to be somewhat seasonal, leaving up th mountain in the fall, returning early spring. Their winter escape was turned into new houses, so now they stay year round. Observations over the years:

    The males get extremely aggressive with each other during mating season. I've seen them viscously attack each other to near the point of death.

    Baby turkeys are incredibly cute. They look like fuzzy tennis balls with legs. They are also apparently quite tasty, as their numbers diminish very quickly.

    We had a female roost in our yard one year. She camped near our basement door for several weeks before nine of her ten babies hatched. Watching them waddle around the yard was adorable.

    Big turkeys are amazing to watch fly. They are ungainly and their aim is poor. My analogy is that turkeys can fly about like I can run. I will if someone's chasing me, but it ain't pretty.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by aimo View Post
    This guy was on my parents' front porch a long time ago (35 mm film camera).

    tom turkey.jpg
    Itís Spring gobbler season a lot of places. Suffice to say, thatís a smart turkey!

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Had a female sharp shinned hawk make a run at my sunflower seed feeders this afternoon. The sharp shinned is a nearly identical, but smaller version of the Cooper's hawk.

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