View Poll Results: When will major pro or college sports resume in America?

Voters
89. You may not vote on this poll
  • Summer: May - July

    8 8.99%
  • Fall: August - October

    41 46.07%
  • Winter: November - January

    17 19.10%
  • First half of 2021: Feb - June

    14 15.73%
  • Second half of 2021: July - Dec

    7 7.87%
  • 2022 or beyond

    2 2.25%
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Results 61 to 80 of 1848
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    NC
    Quote Originally Posted by COYS View Post
    One thing that I think the leagues need to consider even if there is a way to ramp up testing to the point that athletes can be tested every day is what happens when one player tests positive and then the whole team has to be quarantined? Even if the pie in the sky ideas of self-quarantined leagues are feasible, it is inevitable that with thousands of people involved from the players to the coaches to the staff, etc, that someone, somewhere will get sick. As of right now, the medical and scientific communities don't know how long it takes for a person to go from exposure to the virus to becoming sick or where in that process the person also becomes contagious. To avoid infecting the whole league, basically the entire team would suddenly be quarantined.

    The ramifications of that are huge. Imagine if the NBA got its wish to play the playoffs in Vegas using the hotels to quarantine the players, staff, and families. But now imagine that Lebron tests positive and has to sit out for two weeks and the rest of the Lakers are forced to sit out until they test negative for the virus for x number of days in a row. Either the schedules would have to be incredibly flexible (which would require a longer period of isolation for everyone involved in the event) or the league would keep playing games and risk that the biggest match-ups of the season could happen without the biggest stars.
    I think the counterargument to this would be "if we test the whole team every day, then only the positive tested guys would be out." But that still leads to a substantial problem. Let's take your example where the Lakers are in the playoffs and LeBron tests positive. Even if the rest of the team tests negative and can play, they are now at a huge competitive disadvantage moving forward because LeBron would be out. And what if one team has a bunch of guys infected, such that their roster is decimated? Are they expected to proceed with a half team? Forfeit the game?

    Even the scenario in which testing is both effective AND so quick and easy and available that it doesn't create a conflict with the healthcare system to conduct massive daily testing efforts for sporting participants has some huge logistical problems in the absence of a REALLY effective treatment and/or a vaccine.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by COYS View Post
    One thing that I think the leagues need to consider even if there is a way to ramp up testing to the point that athletes can be tested every day is what happens when one player tests positive and then the whole team has to be quarantined? Even if the pie in the sky ideas of self-quarantined leagues are feasible, it is inevitable that with thousands of people involved from the players to the coaches to the staff, etc, that someone, somewhere will get sick. As of right now, the medical and scientific communities don't know how long it takes for a person to go from exposure to the virus to becoming sick or where in that process the person also becomes contagious. To avoid infecting the whole league, basically the entire team would suddenly be quarantined.

    The ramifications of that are huge. Imagine if the NBA got its wish to play the playoffs in Vegas using the hotels to quarantine the players, staff, and families. But now imagine that Lebron tests positive and has to sit out for two weeks and the rest of the Lakers are forced to sit out until they test negative for the virus for x number of days in a row. Either the schedules would have to be incredibly flexible (which would require a longer period of isolation for everyone involved in the event) or the league would keep playing games and risk that the biggest match-ups of the season could happen without the biggest stars.
    You raise an excellent point that I hadnít yet contemplated. Wow, this is a tough one ó so many variables and unknowns.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by CDu View Post
    I think the counterargument to this would be "if we test the whole team every day, then only the positive tested guys would be out." But that still leads to a substantial problem. Let's take your example where the Lakers are in the playoffs and LeBron tests positive. Even if the rest of the team tests negative and can play, they are now at a huge competitive disadvantage moving forward because LeBron would be out. And what if one team has a bunch of guys infected, such that their roster is decimated? Are they expected to proceed with a half team? Forfeit the game?

    Even the scenario in which testing is both effective AND so quick and easy and available that it doesn't create a conflict with the healthcare system to conduct massive daily testing efforts for sporting participants has some huge logistical problems in the absence of a REALLY effective treatment and/or a vaccine.
    I don't know the details (not a fan back then), but didn't Duke lose a NC game prior to 1980 when 1 key player was sick for the NC game? "Life" happens. And when Kareem got hurt in 1980, Magic played CENTER as a rookie and they beat the 76'ers for the NBA championship... *in* Philly. Maybe if this is the road that the NBA goes, the teams will be EXTRA careful to social distance, etc. Which maybe is a good thing.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Honolulu
    Quote Originally Posted by gep View Post
    I don't know the details (not a fan back then), but didn't Duke lose a NC game prior to 1980 when 1 key player was sick for the NC game? "Life" happens. And when Kareem got hurt in 1980, Magic played CENTER as a rookie and they beat the 76'ers for the NBA championship... *in* Philly. Maybe if this is the road that the NBA goes, the teams will be EXTRA careful to social distance, etc. Which maybe is a good thing.
    The Four Corners Offense is coming back, isn't it?

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by JetpackJesus View Post
    The Four Corners Offense is coming back, isn't it?
    And closely guarded will be a technical.

  6. #66
    I have more confidence in the intellect of most of the Duke grads on this board than I do of any level of government. I have less to work with on the NCAA - but I assume that schools such as Duke will have a say on what they decide - meaning that schools will not put their kids at risk if they think the NCAA is making the wrong decision. Or at least some schools presumably. Hopefully.

    My hypothesis has been for the past while that we will have the NBA back in June/July Ė but with no fans in the seats. But television revenue would flow. It is too difficult to look out at this stage to November but prudence would suggest that college basketball can do the same, subject to the comfort level for air travel by colleges that do not have private jets (I assume that Duke does not fly commercial). I also assume that the television revenue is more fruitful than the ticket revenue. When you consider how quickly and emphatic schools such as Duke and UVA were to tell their students to go home, I would speculate that they will err heavily on the side of caution.

    Not sure about other people on this board, but at this stage I am more worried about whether my kids will be attending real classes at college in August or online classes. I am paying for a UVA education with a University of Phoenix college experience. And do I sign a lease in advance to secure an apartment with the prospect of her sitting at home in Canada taking classes. That is the question for some parents.
    Last edited by 1991 duke law; 04-18-2020 at 08:39 AM. Reason: Typo

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Hillsborough,nc
    Quote Originally Posted by gep View Post
    I don't know the details (not a fan back then), but didn't Duke lose a NC game prior to 1980 when 1 key player was sick for the NC game? "Life" happens. And when Kareem got hurt in 1980, Magic played CENTER as a rookie and they beat the 76'ers for the NBA championship... *in* Philly. Maybe if this is the road that the NBA goes, the teams will be EXTRA careful to social distance, etc. Which maybe is a good thing.
    With respect , you cannot practice social distancing in a basketball game..
    Guess testing will be key.
    There are always false negatives in medical testing. ....tricky..

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by gep View Post
    I don't know the details (not a fan back then), but didn't Duke lose a NC game prior to 1980 when 1 key player was sick for the NC game? "Life" happens. And when Kareem got hurt in 1980, Magic played CENTER as a rookie and they beat the 76'ers for the NBA championship... *in* Philly. Maybe if this is the road that the NBA goes, the teams will be EXTRA careful to social distance, etc. Which maybe is a good thing.
    As for Duke not having a key player for NC game prior to 1980, the only game I remember was 1966 final four game against Kentucky. Bobby Verga was sick,even though he played, was not a factor. But Larry Connelly for Kentucky was also sick but played too,so there you go. Hell,I was only 12 yrs.old then, so my memory isn't exactly fresh. But I see your point of how that could affect teams if one or several players test positive for the virus and can't play.Really throws a wrench into things.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Quote Originally Posted by gep View Post
    I don't know the details (not a fan back then), but didn't Duke lose a NC game prior to 1980 when 1 key player was sick for the NC game? "Life" happens. And when Kareem got hurt in 1980, Magic played CENTER as a rookie and they beat the 76'ers for the NBA championship... *in* Philly. Maybe if this is the road that the NBA goes, the teams will be EXTRA careful to social distance, etc. Which maybe is a good thing.
    MusicMan has the answer. Here's a bit more: Bob Verga was a second-team All-American in 1965-66, averaging 18.5 points per game. He was deathly ill for the national semi game against Kentucky. He was deathly ill, but played, scoring only four points in a four-point loss, 89-93, at Cole Field House. We had a good team that year, losing only three games in the regular season, all on the road and by three points or fewer. Jack Marin, second-team All-American and future NBA all-star, was also a star on that team.

    What could have been! Hoop playoffs, of course, are wildly unpredictable. The winner that year was Texas Western, which was historic in that the Miners started five black players. Duke survived to get to the Final Four by surviving a Dean Smith slowdown game in the ACC semis, 21-20, and a regional semi win over St. Joe's, 76-74. in the Raleigh Coliseum.
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    MusicMan has the answer. Here's a bit more: Bob Verga was a second-team All-American in 1965-66, averaging 18.5 points per game. He was deathly ill for the national semi game against Kentucky. He was deathly ill, but played, scoring only four points in a four-point loss, 89-93, at Cole Field House. We had a good team that year, losing only three games in the regular season, all on the road and by three points or fewer. Jack Marin, second-team All-American and future NBA all-star, was also a star on that team.

    What could have been! Hoop playoffs, of course, are wildly unpredictable. The winner that year was Texas Western, which was historic in that the Miners started five black players. Duke survived to get to the Final Four by surviving a Dean Smith slowdown game in the ACC semis, 21-20, and a regional semi win over St. Joe's, 76-74. in the Raleigh Coliseum.
    And letís not forget the national championship game in 1990 (even though we might want to) which Bobby Hurley played despite an severe intestinal bug that caused him to run off the court to get to a bathroom during the game. Of course, we probably werenít fated to win that game anyway.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    He was deathly ill, but played, scoring only four points in a four-point loss, 89-93, at Cole Field House. .
    Not a math major, I gather.

    The final was 83-79.

    Verga had some success early but quickly hit the wall.

    More than a few people have speculated that Conley wasn't all that sick. Rupp wasn't above that kind of motivational ploy.

    Duke defeated Utah the next day in the consolation game, by which time Verga had largely recovered. He scored 15 points.

    To the list of sick players in big games add Mike Gminski, who had a stomach bug when Duke lost to St. John's in Reynolds in the 1979 East Region. G-man soldiered on, threw up at every timeout [on the sidelines, fortunately], got a hit of Gatorade, went back and did it again. This was the same game that Dennard missed with a sprained ankle and Bender missed after undergoing an appendectomy. Banks had a great game to keep it close.

    And there were lots of rumors about much of the team being sick in the 2008 loss to West Virginia. Never really confirmed but DeMarcus Nelson did have some respiratory issues that cropped up from time to time.
    Last edited by -jk; 04-18-2020 at 01:30 PM. Reason: fix quote tag

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by sagegrouse View Post
    MusicMan has the answer. Here's a bit more: Bob Verga was a second-team All-American in 1965-66, averaging 18.5 points per game. He was deathly ill for the national semi game against Kentucky. He was deathly ill, but played, scoring only four points in a four-point loss, 89-93, at Cole Field House. We had a good team that year, losing only three games in the regular season, all on the road and by three points or fewer. Jack Marin, second-team All-American and future NBA all-star, was also a star on that team.

    What could have been! Hoop playoffs, of course, are wildly unpredictable. The winner that year was Texas Western, which was historic in that the Miners started five black players. Duke survived to get to the Final Four by surviving a Dean Smith slowdown game in the ACC semis, 21-20, and a regional semi win over St. Joe's, 76-74. in the Raleigh Coliseum.
    Hey sagegrouse,speaking of that Dean Smith slowdown acc tourney game, mostly I remember Vacindak hitting some key shots to keep us in it. Then Mike Lewis sinks a free throw,and we survive 21-20.Boy, talk about pressure back in those days!

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by hallcity View Post
    And letís not forget the national championship game in 1990 (even though we might want to) which Bobby Hurley played despite an severe intestinal bug that caused him to run off the court to get to a bathroom during the game. Of course, we probably werenít fated to win that game anyway.
    Wow. On that day his last name became a little too real, eh?
    "We are not provided with wisdom, we must discover it for ourselves, after a journey through the wilderness which no one else can take for us, an effort which no one can spare us, for our wisdom is the point of view from which we come at last to regard the world." --M. Proust

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    My wife suggested I start a political party, our only platform plank is resuming all sports ASAP...sees like a sure winner, even if we lose a few tens of millions of citizens, at least we'll have something to watch on TV ...and my wife gets to pick out the White House china pattern...

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NC
    Quote Originally Posted by nmduke2001 View Post
    Also, when a vaccine becomes available...
    Is there an HIV vaccine? A cold vaccine? A herpes vaccine? Sadly, I fear this virus may hamper sports and the quality of life in general for decades to come.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by 4Gen View Post
    Is there an HIV vaccine? A cold vaccine? A herpes vaccine? Sadly, I fear this virus may hamper sports and the quality of life in general for decades to come.
    Seriously? You can't contract HIV or herpes at the grocery store, and people don't die of common cold.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Seriously? You can't contract HIV or herpes at the grocery store, and people don't die of common cold.
    Iím not the doctor here but are you sure about that statement...

    Iím sure if you hangout in a Florida grocery store during spring break you just might stand corrected.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Seriously? You can't contract HIV or herpes at the grocery store, and people don't die of common cold.
    I think you're missing the point, which that we haven't been able to develop a vaccine for every virus, and it is possible we won't for this one. Your response suggests you might have misread the post, there was no comparison of severity or transmissible. Just a (worrisome) thought: we haven't been able to develop vaccines for every virus (such as HIV or Herpes), what if we see similar issues with developing a COVID-19 vaccine? There might be good medical reasons why we can be sure that isn't the case already, but I don't think any of them are public knowledge.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Acymetric View Post
    I think you're missing the point, which that we haven't been able to develop a vaccine for every virus, and it is possible we won't for this one. Your response suggests you might have misread the post, there was no comparison of severity or transmissible. Just a (worrisome) thought: we haven't been able to develop vaccines for every virus (such as HIV or Herpes), what if we see similar issues with developing a COVID-19 vaccine? There might be good medical reasons why we can be sure that isn't the case already, but I don't think any of them are public knowledge.
    If that was the point, I definitely missed it. I guess I have listened to one too many people make false equalencies in the past couple of weeks.
    I apologize if I completely misunderstood and mischaracterized the actual point.

    I do believe that making an effective vaccine for this may be considerably more difficult than people think. Coronaviruses mutate in three different ways, making them something of a moving target.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Quote Originally Posted by J4Kop99 View Post
    Iím not the doctor here but are you sure about that statement...

    Iím sure if you hangout in a Florida grocery store during spring break you just might stand corrected.
    I'm not sure I understand your statement. Do I need to overhaul my sarcasm meter?

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