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  1. #17661
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Rougemont Nebulae
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemmonsDevil View Post
    Well I have tried that. Then that ribbing is for my pleasure.
    When it comes to sex I've taken a good ribbing from my wife on several occasions.
    Last edited by CameronBlue; 09-23-2021 at 08:11 PM. Reason: Oh wait...I don't think that's what you meant.
    "You will stop hearing the term 'Big Brother' because we will do it to ourselves." --Neil Postman

  2. #17662
    Quote Originally Posted by CameronBlue View Post
    When it comes to sex I've taken a good ribbing from my wife on several occasions.
    Strong work.

  3. #17663
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Adam gave a rib to get Eve.

    Or so the story goes.
    “Fútbol is life!” — Dani Rojas, Richmond Greyhounds

  4. #17664
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Kind of interesting that the head of the CDC decided to not go with the ACIP's recommendations, but rather to expand on them a bit. I hope she is properly understanding the data from Israel.

    Since I am a frontline healthcare worker, I fit into Dr. Walensky's expanded recommendation group; I will likely be asked to get a booster soon. I'm not convinced that I need one, but I am obviously not opposed to a booster. I just wonder about using a dose that might be better used elsewhere.
    "We are not provided with wisdom, we must discover it for ourselves, after a journey through the wilderness which no one else can take for us, an effort which no one can spare us, for our wisdom is the point of view from which we come at last to regard the world." --M. Proust

  5. #17665
    ^Seems VERY unusual that that would happen as my understanding is that it's usually a formality at that point. I think Dr. Walensky backed herself into a corner a bit given her presence at the White House briefings weeks ago that talked about and pushed boosters upcoming. And the vote was 9-6 on the "at risk workers" so it wasn't an overwhelming recommendation to exclude that group to begin with. Some people were going to get boosters anyways (or already have) by finding a willing doctor/nurse or simply neglecting to mention they are already fully vaccinated, but of course the signed off recommendation will be impactful to increase that number significantly. But to your point, the advantage of boosters for otherwise healthy/young-ish people seems pretty small compared to getting UNVACINNATED people their initial shots....but I suppose one doesn't exclude the other.

    Will be interesting to see what happens with Moderna and JnJ. Moderna is a bit more complex perhaps because they've halved the dose for the booster (trials are @50 micrograms) whereas Pfizer is the exact same dose that was previously given (30 micrograms).

  6. #17666
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Kind of interesting that the head of the CDC decided to not go with the ACIP's recommendations, but rather to expand on them a bit. I hope she is properly understanding the data from Israel.

    Since I am a frontline healthcare worker, I fit into Dr. Walensky's expanded recommendation group; I will likely be asked to get a booster soon. I'm not convinced that I need one, but I am obviously not opposed to a booster. I just wonder about using a dose that might be better used elsewhere.
    I would worry about this, too, except that there is no shortage of doses in the US. Folks are not NOT getting them b/c of lack of availability now. The ones that are being thrown away b/c of expiration and vials that were not completely used, THAT bothers me.

  7. #17667
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    ^Seems VERY unusual that that would happen as my understanding is that it's usually a formality at that point. I think Dr. Walensky backed herself into a corner a bit given her presence at the White House briefings weeks ago that talked about and pushed boosters upcoming.
    Seems a bit political if you ask me. President Biden wants the booster, she was appointed day 1 of the Biden administration. Just saying. I'm just glad the previous WH occupant is gone or we'd be hearing for weeks about politicians not listening to the scientists*.

    * I'm not worried about the science on this one. I feel confident that this is one case where the scientists are being too cautious with the data. The data will eventually show this to be the correct path forward.

  8. #17668
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Kind of interesting that the head of the CDC decided to not go with the ACIP's recommendations, but rather to expand on them a bit. I hope she is properly understanding the data from Israel.

    Since I am a frontline healthcare worker, I fit into Dr. Walensky's expanded recommendation group; I will likely be asked to get a booster soon. I'm not convinced that I need one, but I am obviously not opposed to a booster. I just wonder about using a dose that might be better used elsewhere.
    I do agree with you and the data that healthy, vaccinated people under 65 probably don't need a booster at this time from the personal immunogenicity POV. If you get COVID you should likely have a mild case and would not be a drain on the overburdened healthcare systems

    However, for high-risk occupations, I think the booster decreasing the likelihood of any infection in vaccinated people and a decrease in transmission makes it worthwhile. Health care workers that test positive even if asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic should not be working and that can stress the healthcare system. Boosting other occupations, like teachers, should help decrease transmission as well.

    As for the are these boosters needed elsewhere in the world question, this compiled Twitter thread from Andy Slavitt suggest that last mile on-the-ground logistics (not lack of doses) is playing a big role in the slow pace in Africa
    Coach K on Kyle Singler - "What position does he play? ... He plays winner."

    "Duke is never the underdog" - Quinn Cook

  9. #17669
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Watching carolina Go To HELL!
    I plan to get my Pfizer booster shot on Tuesday. I have a Duke football game and tailgate on Saturday, a golf game on Sunday and a dental appointment on Monday. So Tuesday seems like the perfect time if there are any reactions/side effects in the couple of days that follow.
    Ozzie, your paradigm of optimism!

    Go To Hell carolina, Go To Hell!
    9F 9F 9F
    http://www.EGLEW.com


  10. #17670
    Did the boosters show less/more side effects than dose 2 in trials? Anyone know?

  11. #17671
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Quote Originally Posted by tbyers11 View Post
    I do agree with you and the data that healthy, vaccinated people under 65 probably don't need a booster at this time from the personal immunogenicity POV. If you get COVID you should likely have a mild case and would not be a drain on the overburdened healthcare systems

    However, for high-risk occupations, I think the booster decreasing the likelihood of any infection in vaccinated people and a decrease in transmission makes it worthwhile. Health care workers that test positive even if asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic should not be working and that can stress the healthcare system. Boosting other occupations, like teachers, should help decrease transmission as well.

    As for the are these boosters needed elsewhere in the world question, this compiled Twitter thread from Andy Slavitt suggest that last mile on-the-ground logistics (not lack of doses) is playing a big role in the slow pace in Africa
    A booster may also decrease the angst of those in high risk occupations and may result in more of those people staying in those careers and on the job.


    One hopes.

  12. #17672
    My mom got her booster. She was feeling pretty crappy the next day, a little more so than the first or second shot. But one anecdote doesn't mean much

  13. #17673
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Ash View Post
    My mom got her booster. She was feeling pretty crappy the next day, a little more so than the first or second shot. But one anecdote doesn't mean much
    I'm confused on how "third dose" is being used vs. "booster". (Not directed at you specifically, Lord Ash...) I had thought that a third dose was for when the first two doses didn't prompt an immune response, and a booster was for when it did but had waned. I'm guessing that in the case of Lord Ash's mother, that would mean it was actually a third dose and not a booster? Trying to get the terminology right...please help!

    Also, my impression is that for Pfizer, it kind of doesn't matter because they're the same shot, but for Moderna they're not? (A Moderna third dose is twice the amount of mRNA as a Moderna booster?)

  14. #17674
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDevil2K View Post
    I'm confused on how "third dose" is being used vs. "booster". (Not directed at you specifically, Lord Ash...) I had thought that a third dose was for when the first two doses didn't prompt an immune response, and a booster was for when it did but had waned. I'm guessing that in the case of Lord Ash's mother, that would mean it was actually a third dose and not a booster? Trying to get the terminology right...please help!

    Also, my impression is that for Pfizer, it kind of doesn't matter because they're the same shot, but for Moderna they're not? (A Moderna third dose is twice the amount of mRNA as a Moderna booster?)
    Our immunologists and epidemiologists (at the hospital where I work) tried to explain it as "third dose" was for those who were immunocompromised, meaning they required a third dose for it to really be effective instead of just two doses like everyone else. The "booster" is to be thought of as more like a tetanus booster, given at later intervals, but not considered part of the original vaccine.

    I apologize if I have confused you more. It is Friday.

  15. #17675
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDevil2K View Post
    I'm confused on how "third dose" is being used vs. "booster". (Not directed at you specifically, Lord Ash...) I had thought that a third dose was for when the first two doses didn't prompt an immune response, and a booster was for when it did but had waned. I'm guessing that in the case of Lord Ash's mother, that would mean it was actually a third dose and not a booster? Trying to get the terminology right...please help!

    Also, my impression is that for Pfizer, it kind of doesn't matter because they're the same shot, but for Moderna they're not? (A Moderna third dose is twice the amount of mRNA as a Moderna booster?)
    As you said, for Pfizer, they're using it interchangeably because the third dose IS the booster because the Pfizer regimen was two doses. Same with Moderna. Yes, a third dose/booster for Moderna would be halved if it comes to pass (50 micrograms instead of the 100 microgram of the two-dose regimen), but I don't think that changes its label. For JnJ, a "booster" would be the second dose theoretically.

    You can see in this article they use them to mean the same thing basically for Pfizer:
    https://www.businessinsider.com/covi...rm-pain-2021-9
    The federal government is starting to recommend third shots of COVID-19 vaccines to large numbers of vulnerable people living in the US.

    Already in August, the US Food and Drug Administration authorized, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended, a boost for all immunocompromised people who were vaccinated at least a month prior.

    This week, the FDA expanded its booster authorization to a much broader population, and the CDC is now recommending certain adults who've had Pfizer's vaccine get a third shot at least six months after their initial one.

    But the truth is that many people have already taken it upon themselves to get boosted, whether they are in priority groups or not.

  16. #17676
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    This’ll get ‘em vaccinated!

    “Men may be six times more likely to develop brief or long-term erectile dysfunction after contracting the virus. The vaccine can prevent this.”

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...CE096D5E63FFF3

  17. #17677
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by MChambers View Post
    “Men may be six times more likely to develop brief or long-term erectile dysfunction after contracting the virus. The vaccine can prevent this.”

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...CE096D5E63FFF3
    And to the contrary, the vaccine apparently gives you genital swelling if my Twitter is to be believed. So, win-win on the shot.
    “Fútbol is life!” — Dani Rojas, Richmond Greyhounds

  18. #17678
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New York, NY

    "Diminué depuis qu'il est vacciné, Jérémy Chardy suspend sa saison."

    Oh right, I forget that despite the school's nickname (les Diables Bleu), Duke doesn't have a French requirement.

    Jeremy Chardy just opted out of the rest of the tennis season, explaining that he's had a bad reaction to the covid vaccine that has limited his ability to play. He says he now regrets the decision to get vaccinated.

    As someone who wants people to get vaccinated, this news bums me out since it'll be used by some people (and some athletes) to not get the shot. I'm tempted to say, well this guy is a 34 yr old athlete, which is 82 in human years, and the season ends in 6 or 7 weeks anyway, and how does he know that it was the vaccine? Especially when he says he took tests and "knows" his problems are vaccine related. What test would tell him that? I'm also content to say that if he, you, and I happen to be 3 people who have some moderately significant reactions, but 1 million people have minimal/no reactions, my view of the vaccine wouldn't change just because I happened to be the one was was (temporarily) undone by the vaccine. Especially if by vaccinating healthy 34 year old athletes, we can feel more comfortable getting back to school, restaurants, hospitals, and airports--none of which strike me as great ideas if they don't include vaccine mandates.

    OTOH, maybe the anti-vax contingent will be getting some things right as time wears on...

    https://www.news24.com/sport/tennis/...d-jab-20210924

  19. #17679
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by johnb View Post
    Oh right, I forget that despite the school's nickname (les Diables Bleu), Duke doesn't have a French requirement.

    Jeremy Chardy just opted out of the rest of the tennis season, explaining that he's had a bad reaction to the covid vaccine that has limited his ability to play. He says he now regrets the decision to get vaccinated.

    As someone who wants people to get vaccinated, this news bums me out since it'll be used by some people (and some athletes) to not get the shot. I'm tempted to say, well this guy is a 34 yr old athlete, which is 82 in human years, and the season ends in 6 or 7 weeks anyway, and how does he know that it was the vaccine? Especially when he says he took tests and "knows" his problems are vaccine related. What test would tell him that? I'm also content to say that if he, you, and I happen to be 3 people who have some moderately significant reactions, but 1 million people have minimal/no reactions, my view of the vaccine wouldn't change just because I happened to be the one was was (temporarily) undone by the vaccine. Especially if by vaccinating healthy 34 year old athletes, we can feel more comfortable getting back to school, restaurants, hospitals, and airports--none of which strike me as great ideas if they don't include vaccine mandates.

    OTOH, maybe the anti-vax contingent will be getting some things right as time wears on...

    https://www.news24.com/sport/tennis/...d-jab-20210924
    yeah, it's regrettable. I've got a neighbor who is a world class rock climber, and he got decked from myocarditis after his Moderna jabs (they initially thought he'd had a heart attack) but he's smart enough to know it was just luck of the draw, no regrets about having been jabbed. (He's finally doing much better now).

  20. #17680

    Pfizer Booster - Temperature Control Assurance

    We are scheduled to receive the Pfizer booster this afternoon at CVS.
    It appears that CVS is the only drugstore in our area offering the Pfizer vaccine. Other pharmacies are offering the J&J because they lack the equipment to maintain the low temperatures required by the Pfizer product.
    I read online that some CVS are using dry ice to temporarily store the vaccines and that refrigeration rather than freezing is ok for a relatively short period of time.
    As a consumer, what assurances do we have that vaccines have been kept at temperatures specified by the manufacturer?

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