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  1. #17581
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    Today's winning health care savant is Nicki Minaj who told her 22M followers that the vaccine makes men impotent and swells up their testicles. Joe Biden offered to call her on the phone and explain her ineptitude, then she said she'd accepted his invitation to the White House which, of course, he never offered. So yes, we are in good hands overall.
    Best thing I saw today

    KpihD6T.jpg

  2. #17582

    Can "Long Covid" Sufferers Spread the Virus in the Lingering Phase?

    I have a question for this thread's medical experts in immunology/virology:
    If someone contracts a severe case of Covid-19 (most likely the Delta variant)-- and has severe medical symptoms-- but now appears to be "somewhat" recovered-- although still suffering from a variety of lingering effects (i.e.- what is often called "long Covid")-- does that person remain a likely carrier/spreader of the virus, weeks (and even a month or two) after having the infection? Do these people have the "high viral loads" in their upper respiratory tract that tend to describe the people who are still actively likely to spread the virus?

    Put succintly: Are "long Covid" sufferers considered to still be Typhoid Marys of Covid-19, when they are that long, lingering phase?

  3. #17583
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by Dedgummit View Post
    I have a question for this thread's medical experts in immunology/virology:
    If someone contracts a severe case of Covid-19 (most likely the Delta variant)-- and has severe medical symptoms-- but now appears to be "somewhat" recovered-- although still suffering from a variety of lingering effects (i.e.- what is often called "long Covid")-- does that person remain a likely carrier/spreader of the virus, weeks (and even a month or two) after having the infection? Do these people have the "high viral loads" in their upper respiratory tract that tend to describe the people who are still actively likely to spread the virus?

    Put succintly: Are "long Covid" sufferers considered to still be Typhoid Marys of Covid-19, when they are that long, lingering phase?
    I’m no medical expert but my story might help a little. I’ve recovered from a recent breakthrough infection. At the end of the 10 day quarantine period I hadn’t had a fever for 6 days but still had some nasal congestion and a cough. Both had improved but were still there. On day 14 I took a PCR test which came back negative. My primary physician told me it was common to have lingering symptoms and I was gtg as long as I was fever free and my other symptoms had improved. I’ve been out and about since my PCR test came back even though I still have a slight cough at day 21. I wear a mask in indoor spaces to model the behavior I like to see in others but I’m not worried about being a vector of transmission.

    Also, for what it’s worth both my wife and I have experienced lingering symptoms that are cyclical but not in a predictable pattern. So, my cough might be gone for 2 days and then reappear the third. Same with the nasal congestion although the cough and nasal congestion might not reappear at the same time. My wife still has occasional fatigue and headache.

    One last thought. Anecdotally, there seems to be a fair number of mild to moderate COVID sufferers who have long COVID symptoms, but I don’t know if there’s statistical correlation between severe disease and higher rates of long COVID.
    Last edited by mph; 09-18-2021 at 06:25 PM.

  4. #17584
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dedgummit View Post
    I have a question for this thread's medical experts in immunology/virology:
    If someone contracts a severe case of Covid-19 (most likely the Delta variant)-- and has severe medical symptoms-- but now appears to be "somewhat" recovered-- although still suffering from a variety of lingering effects (i.e.- what is often called "long Covid")-- does that person remain a likely carrier/spreader of the virus, weeks (and even a month or two) after having the infection? Do these people have the "high viral loads" in their upper respiratory tract that tend to describe the people who are still actively likely to spread the virus?

    Put succintly: Are "long Covid" sufferers considered to still be Typhoid Marys of Covid-19, when they are that long, lingering phase?
    No. Long Covid sufferers appear to be non-contagious.

    Testing is sometimes positive for up to as long as ninety days even in patients who recovery uneventfully, just FYI. These people are also generally thought to be non-contagious provided it has been more then ten days since the symptoms began, they have had nl fever for at least 24 hours, and all other symptoms are improving.

  5. #17585
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    YLE on what to do if you got the J&J

    Interesting analysis for those of us who got the J&J vaccine. I think I'll call my PCP this week.

    "If I got the J&J vaccine, I would check-in with my clinician to discuss my risks of COVID19 and the benefits of a second dose. But, itís important to note that clinicians canít formally advise either. A second dose for J&J is not approved by the FDA. After having this discussion with my clinician, I would go get an mRNA vaccine. I wouldnít have done this before, but Iím not liking these recent J&J hospitalization effectiveness numbers from the CDC."

    https://yourlocalepidemiologist.subs...s-what-we-know

  6. #17586

    Covid Booster Timing Strategy

    My spouse and I are in our late 60s and received the Pfizer vaccine in Jan/Feb.

    After enjoying a period of normalcy post-vaccination, as Covid case numbers have risen in our area (Alamance County, NC), we've more or less reverted to the same level of caution we practiced prior to getting vaccinated. We stay home and only leave the house for essentials. No gatherings, no restaurants, etc.
    Assuming the FDA approves boosters for those over 65, we were planning to get it as soon as available.
    This article in The Atlantic suggests that booster timing warrants strategic thinking to better prepare our immune systems for the next surge.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...r-shot/620123/

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