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  1. #17501
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I don't think many people are suggesting that as a strategy (although maybe there are some...). But rather simply asking if you happened to have had COVID already, do you need to get vaccinated still and how does the durability and efficacy of protection of the various scenarios compare to one another.
    Yes. I have a close friend in this situation.

  2. #17502
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    Well

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I don't think many people are suggesting that as a strategy (although maybe there are some...). But rather simply asking if you happened to have had COVID already, do you need to get vaccinated still and how does the durability and efficacy of protection of the various scenarios compare to one another.
    Why wouldn't you get vaccinated, even if you've had Covid? What's the downside? (Besides the itching caused by those microchips, of course)

    One friend of mine had Covid twice, and then got vaccinated. Another had it once and was happy to get vaccinated later.

  3. #17503
    Quote Originally Posted by MChambers View Post
    Why wouldn't you get vaccinated, even if you've had Covid? What's the downside? (Besides the itching caused by those microchips, of course)

    One friend of mine had Covid twice, and then got vaccinated. Another had it once and was happy to get vaccinated later.
    I would agree. I think it's more curiosity than anything else as we look towards the future. But in the current "uncertain" state, doesn't seem like there's much downside. So, I guess your point is if it doesn't actually impact your behavior/decision-making at this point, what's the difference? I could buy that for now, but think continuing to gather information so people can be informed is always a good thing.

  4. #17504
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    Sure

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I would agree. I think it's more curiosity than anything else as we look towards the future. But in the current "uncertain" state, doesn't seem like there's much downside. So, I guess your point is if it doesn't actually impact your behavior/decision-making at this point, what's the difference? I could buy that for now, but think continuing to gather information so people can be informed is always a good thing.
    I agree. But off the top of my head, I can think of three friends who had Covid (one twice) and all three of them got vaccinated as soon as they could. No hesitation at all. One of them is a practicing doctor.

  5. #17505
    Quote Originally Posted by MChambers View Post
    Why wouldn't you get vaccinated, even if you've had Covid? What's the downside? (Besides the itching caused by those microchips, of course)
    Having to tell your friends is the downside. What will they think?

  6. #17506
    Quote Originally Posted by MChambers View Post
    I agree. But off the top of my head, I can think of three friends who had Covid (one twice) and all three of them got vaccinated as soon as they could. No hesitation at all. One of them is a practicing doctor.
    My sister got vaccinated (dose #1) and COVID at basically the same time. She did get her second dose per the schedule as well based on her doctor's recommendation.

  7. #17507
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by MChambers View Post
    Why wouldn't you get vaccinated, even if you've had Covid? What's the downside? (Besides the itching caused by those microchips, of course)

    One friend of mine had Covid twice, and then got vaccinated. Another had it once and was happy to get vaccinated later.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I would agree. I think it's more curiosity than anything else as we look towards the future. But in the current "uncertain" state, doesn't seem like there's much downside. So, I guess your point is if it doesn't actually impact your behavior/decision-making at this point, what's the difference? I could buy that for now, but think continuing to gather information so people can be informed is always a good thing.
    If there were no boost to immunity from getting the vaccine after having contracted COVID (all evidence I've seen suggests otherwise, I'm just explaining why someone would ask the question if they were unfamiliar with the evidence), then people who got COVID would be better off not getting the vaccine (because they would be subjecting themselves to the risk of rare but real adverse reactions/side effects for no benefit).

    Of course, given that the information we've seen seems to indicate that "both" leads to stronger immunity, and that we know that regardless of whether you contracted COVID or got vaccinated the immunity is not long lasting, all signs point towards "just go get vaccinated."

  8. #17508
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I don't think many people are suggesting that as a strategy (although maybe there are some...). ...
    True, not many on this board.

    But it is the strategy of many people we know. Two guys Iíve played poker with for years extolled natural immunity and refused vaccination. Idiot one was a healthy, 40-something yo successful lawyer. In general an incredibly sharp guy but not about pandemics apparently. Not only did he refuse the shots he also decided to take his unvaccinated self to vacation in Florida. And big surpriseÖ. Anyway he got a pretty bad case, sick as a dog for three weeks but never hospitalized. I donít know if he has residual effects but heís back to playing poker, I'm told.

    Natural immunity Idiot 2, also in his 40ís but a former heavy drinker. Got the virus 6 weeks ago, was hospitalized, took a turn for the worse. He was on deaths door and docs decided to put him on a ventilator. He refused and that may have been one of his very few good decisions in the last year (I wonít tell you about the jet ski thing, except it was really bad). Iím told he is still recovering but out of the the hospital.

    Iím happy he is going to make it. But why, oh why did he fall for the all natural immunity crap?

    And of course some countries have chosen the same strategy as Idiots 1 & 2.

    Just seems like a shot (if available) would be easier. Not that anyone here is arguing against that. Iím just venting.

  9. #17509
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    It was definitely a thing earlier in the pandemic, people were likening it to chicken pox and having "COVID parties" (although I don't know how common that was vs. it just making good clickbait and getting played up for that reason).

  10. #17510
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...vid-cases-rise

    Some interesting stuff in this article. Huge outbreak in Alberta, Canada (oil rich, conservative, a bit like Canada's Texas) has docs worried, even though 71% of the eligible population is fully vaccinated, 79% partially.
    This article says Alberta has been the site of North America's highest caseloads (I assume per capita, but it doesn't say that).

    THe province has very few Covid restrictions. Perhaps the majore takeaway is that 90% of the folks in the ICU are unvaccinated.
    So even a fairly highly vaccinated place can be overwhelmed by cases if a significant minority eschew Covid protocols.
    Interesting story. I wonder if any studies have examined the risks of outbreaks in highly vaccinated communities based on the distribution of the unvaccinated within that community. It makes intuitive sense that in most communities the unvaccinated arenít evenly distributed but are clustered together in subgroups of families, schools, churches, and even workplaces. It also makes sense to me that the less evenly distributed the unvaccinated are in a particular community, the more vulnerable that community is to large spikes in cases, hospitalization, and death. But, I havenít seen any empirical evidence one way or the other.

  11. #17511
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    I saw a study recently that said these who got Covid and then got both vaccines appear to be what they called 'super-immune,' meaning, from what they said, that they have outstanding protection against the Delta variant and against all other variants that have circulated or are currently circulating. IIRC I think they also did mathematical modeling and suggested that these people would also have broad immunity against variants that are 'likely to arise' in the near future.
    Sorry, can't remember exactly where I saw ut and right now I am on vacation so I can't look it up.

  12. #17512
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I saw a study recently that said these who got Covid and then got both vaccines appear to be what they called 'super-immune,' meaning, from what they said, that they have outstanding protection against the Delta variant and against all other variants that have circulated or are currently circulating. IIRC I think they also did mathematical modeling and suggested that these people would also have broad immunity against variants that are 'likely to arise' in the near future.
    Sorry, can't remember exactly where I saw ut and right now I am on vacation so I can't look it up.
    I would be very interested to see that information when it is available. PM would be helpful.

    Trying to talk my friend into the vaccine. He is convinced the natural immunity of having had the virus is sufficient. I don't know enough to argue with him.

  13. #17513
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I saw a study recently that said these who got Covid and then got both vaccines appear to be what they called 'super-immune,' meaning, from what they said, that they have outstanding protection against the Delta variant and against all other variants that have circulated or are currently circulating. IIRC I think they also did mathematical modeling and suggested that these people would also have broad immunity against variants that are 'likely to arise' in the near future.
    Sorry, can't remember exactly where I saw ut and right now I am on vacation so I can't look it up.
    Question for someone who is more of an expert than me: would mucosal immunity be a contributing factor to the ďsuper immunityď? If thatís the case, then my colleagueís nasal spray vaccine would be great for boosters.

  14. #17514
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston area, OK, Newton, right by Heartbreak Hill
    Quote Originally Posted by Skydog View Post
    True, not many on this board.

    But it is the strategy of many people we know. Two guys Iíve played poker with for years extolled natural immunity and refused vaccination. Idiot one was a healthy, 40-something yo successful lawyer. In general an incredibly sharp guy but not about pandemics apparently. Not only did he refuse the shots he also decided to take his unvaccinated self to vacation in Florida. And big surpriseÖ. Anyway he got a pretty bad case, sick as a dog for three weeks but never hospitalized. I donít know if he has residual effects but heís back to playing poker, I'm told.

    Natural immunity Idiot 2, also in his 40ís but a former heavy drinker. Got the virus 6 weeks ago, was hospitalized, took a turn for the worse. He was on deaths door and docs decided to put him on a ventilator. He refused and that may have been one of his very few good decisions in the last year (I wonít tell you about the jet ski thing, except it was really bad). Iím told he is still recovering but out of the the hospital.

    Iím happy he is going to make it. But why, oh why did he fall for the all natural immunity crap?

    And of course some countries have chosen the same strategy as Idiots 1 & 2.

    Just seems like a shot (if available) would be easier. Not that anyone here is arguing against that. Iím just venting.
    Oh, but they are. There are multiple people in this thread arguing against vaccines.

  15. #17515
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.

    Super immunity?

    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    I saw a study recently that said these who got Covid and then got both vaccines appear to be what they called 'super-immune,' meaning, from what they said, that they have outstanding protection against the Delta variant and against all other variants that have circulated or are currently circulating. IIRC I think they also did mathematical modeling and suggested that these people would also have broad immunity against variants that are 'likely to arise' in the near future.
    Sorry, can't remember exactly where I saw ut and right now I am on vacation so I can't look it up.
    Here's an article that cites several studies, including a preprint that sounds like what you saw:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...nated-rcna1974

  16. #17516
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston area, OK, Newton, right by Heartbreak Hill
    Quote Originally Posted by mph View Post
    Interesting story. I wonder if any studies have examined the risks of outbreaks in highly vaccinated communities based on the distribution of the unvaccinated within that community. It makes intuitive sense that in most communities the unvaccinated aren’t evenly distributed but are clustered together in subgroups of families, schools, churches, and even workplaces. It also makes sense to me that the less evenly distributed the unvaccinated are in a particular community, the more vulnerable that community is to large spikes in cases, hospitalization, and death. But, I haven’t seen any empirical evidence one way or the other.
    Well, Israel is a good example. IMHO, that study looking at the ORs for breakthrough infections couldn't have been done in a worse place for that very reason.

  17. #17517
    It does seem there's growing evidence that those infected with the virus previously may be as protected or moreso than those who are vaccinated. Here's an article from today's Washington Post that really does a good job of summarizing some of the points my friend has been making

  18. #17518
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    My sister got vaccinated (dose #1) and COVID at basically the same time. She did get her second dose per the schedule as well based on her doctor's recommendation.
    That's what happened to my daughter. She received the first Pfizer shot on a Thursday, was exposed by a close friend who had just contracted the virus (after not being vaccinated) on a Sunday, and then started getting symptoms the following Tuesday. She tested positive a few days later. She was sick with what was like a bad flu for almost a week then got back on her feet. A couple of weeks after she got her second Pfizer shot. I'm assuming she's now in the best shape of everyone in our family.

  19. #17519
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    It does seem there's growing evidence that those infected with the virus previously may be as protected or moreso than those who are vaccinated. Here's an article from today's Washington Post that really does a good job of summarizing some of the points my friend has been making
    I donít entirely agree with the authorís statement that vaccine doses were wasted on those who were previously infected. For those with long haul covid, the vaccine appears to help.

    One of my colleagues is an author on the Wash U study that is cited. A friend asked me about getting vaccinated after having covid and I wanted to give the best possible answer, so I asked him. His response was that it doesnít hurt anything and provides additional insurance.

  20. #17520
    Quote Originally Posted by ArkieDukie View Post
    I donít entirely agree with the authorís statement that vaccine doses were wasted on those who were previously infected. For those with long haul covid, the vaccine appears to help.

    One of my colleagues is an author on the Wash U study that is cited. A friend asked me about getting vaccinated after having covid and I wanted to give the best possible answer, so I asked him. His response was that it doesnít hurt anything and provides additional insurance.
    And that only makes sense. Not sure why anyone who had gone through a bout with covid wouldn't also want that extra insurance.

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