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Thread: The Irishman

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    I'm sure part of the deal between Marty and Netflix involved making a movie as long as he darn well wanted it to be but I agree, it could/should have been about 30-45 minutes shorter.
    I think you are right on both points.
    Don't waste your time on House of Cards S6!
    -We found out Frank was critical to making anyone else in the show interesting...not a surprise...

  2. #22
    I enjoyed The Irishman. I donít think Scorsese broke any new ground but he tells a mob story very well and, of course, the cast is excellent. I watched it Sunday afternoon and didnít find it too slow or too long. 3 hours is nothing compared to binge watching several seasons of show in one weekend or 3-4 episodes/night as Iíve done numerous times.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by HereBeforeCoachK View Post
    DeNiro, Pesche, Keitel and Pacino...the four horsemen of American gangster movies...and to think where Pesche got his big time start in the Lethal Weapon series...
    I have to disagree. Pesci was nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in Raging Bull, many years before Lethal Weapon.

    His stardom was really propelled after winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Goodfellas, which included the "whaddya mean I'm funny?!?!" scene. It was that scene and that film that made him a household name, IIRC.
    Hard at work making beautiful things.

  4. #24
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    Watching a Duke football game takes three hours. Just sayin'.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmymax View Post
    Watching a Duke football game takes three hours. Just sayin'.
    Wasn't Jimmy Max a character in the Irishman?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by lotusland View Post
    I enjoyed The Irishman. I donít think Scorsese broke any new ground but he tells a mob story very well and, of course, the cast is excellent. I watched it Sunday afternoon and didnít find it too slow or too long. 3 hours is nothing compared to binge watching several seasons of show in one weekend or 3-4 episodes/night as Iíve done numerous times.
    Welp, I accidentally started the movie last night and watched it straight through, ending the film at a time that is too late to mention here.

    Highly recommend. Agree with the assessment that no new ground is covered. Not sure if it's possible to do so at this point. Goodfellas was perfect and can't be improved upon, IMHO.

    I thought DeNiro might be a bit long in the tooth for the part. Although the makeup to make him look younger was pretty good, he still walked with the gait of the older man that he is. I was never convinced he was really in his 40s or however old he was supposed to be in the earlier years of the film.
    Hard at work making beautiful things.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Edouble View Post
    I have to disagree. Pesci was nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in Raging Bull, many years before Lethal Weapon.

    His stardom was really propelled after winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Goodfellas, which included the "whaddya mean I'm funny?!?!" scene. It was that scene and that film that made him a household name, IIRC.
    My bad on Raging Bull...I never saw it...Lethal was my first memory of Pesci.

    And there's no doubt, that rather gruesome scene in Good Fellas is what really propelled him. That guaranteed he would be in every mob movie thereafter. Poor bartender....(I think it was the bartender).
    Don't waste your time on House of Cards S6!
    -We found out Frank was critical to making anyone else in the show interesting...not a surprise...

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDukeFan View Post
    I know several who did not. Too long and kind of boring.
    My whole thinking regarding the film is what new ground does it break? Weíve had The Godfather movies, Goodfellas, The Departed, Hoffa and many more. While it may be well done havenít we covered this ground already?

    I'm probably being petty in another thread.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    My whole thinking regarding the film is what new ground does it break? Weíve had The Godfather movies, Goodfellas, The Departed, Hoffa and many more. While it may be well done havenít we covered this ground already?
    I'm with this. Going with the 'its not what the movie is about, its how it is about it', I'm not sure what this one did that made it great. I enjoyed it and feel I need to watch it again, but I can't say I'd put it on any 'special' list.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by YmoBeThere View Post
    My whole thinking regarding the film is what new ground does it break? Weíve had The Godfather movies, Goodfellas, The Departed, Hoffa and many more. While it may be well done havenít we covered this ground already?
    Only supposedly answering the question on Hoffa....but you're right, after a while, these movies to run together.
    Don't waste your time on House of Cards S6!
    -We found out Frank was critical to making anyone else in the show interesting...not a surprise...

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by fidel View Post
    I'm with this. Going with the 'its not what the movie is about, its how it is about it', I'm not sure what this one did that made it great. I enjoyed it and feel I need to watch it again, but I can't say I'd put it on any 'special' list.
    I find it to be beautifully made.

    It's like looking at a 30th Monet painting of the Gardens at Giverny.

    It's not groundbreaking at all. I enjoyed it for its aesthetics though.
    Hard at work making beautiful things.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edouble View Post
    I find it to be beautifully made.

    It's like looking at a 30th Monet painting of the Gardens at Giverny.

    It's not groundbreaking at all. I enjoyed it for its aesthetics though.
    I agree. A film doesn't have to break new ground for it to be great. I enjoy the genre so this was superb in my opinion.

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by HereBeforeCoachK View Post
    My bad on Raging Bull...I never saw it...Lethal was my first memory of Pesci.

    And there's no doubt, that rather gruesome scene in Good Fellas is what really propelled him. That guaranteed he would be in every mob movie thereafter. Poor bartender...(I think it was the bartender).
    I think Home Alone sealed it. /s

  14. #34
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    Finally found the time to sit down and watch. Woof, 3.5 hours is a lot. If you're going to have that long of a run time, each scene better deliver. This had an extra 30-45 minutes in it.

    Pacino stole the show for me. Pesci and De Niro were good, but paled in comparison. Thought the de-aging on the faces looked fine, but they still moved like old men, so it came off a little strange. Not a groundbreaking movie, but it delivers on what it set out to do.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by luburch View Post
    Finally found the time to sit down and watch. Woof, 3.5 hours is a lot. If you're going to have that long of a run time, each scene better deliver. This had an extra 30-45 minutes in it.

    Pacino stole the show for me. Pesci and De Niro were good, but paled in comparison. Thought the de-aging on the faces looked fine, but they still moved like old men, so it came off a little strange. Not a groundbreaking movie, but it delivers on what it set out to do.
    I watched the "Conversations" extra piece on the film in which Pacino, Pesci, DeNiro and Scorcese talked about making the film. The actors mentioned that the de-aging was pretty disorienting since the rig that was filming them had twelve cameras on it. They weren't sure where to look or not look. It was apparently kind of challenging even for actors with all the experience these guys have.

    They also mentioned one of the scenes that depicted Hoffa back in the sixties. In the scene, Hoffa has to jump up out of his chair and exit the scene. They said after the first shot, they had to debate who was going to tell Pacino that he needed to hop up out of the chair like he was 49, and not like he was 70+ or whatever his actual age is.

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