Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 67

Thread: Ymmm, Bourbon

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by Tripping William View Post
    Lots of talk about bourbon barrels in ďthat otherĒ Ymmm thread, though.
    Shameless.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    Angelís Envy.
    A favorite of mine also. Old Grandad 114 is another I like, and needless to say it packs a punch. But is smooth.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    This is a topic near and dear to my soul (and my mouth and stomach). I have many thoughts:

    Old favorite used to be Elmer T. Lee. Would run about $32/bottle and tasted better than bourbons twice as expensive. But then Elmer (he was the master distiller at Buffalo Trace) died a few years back and there was a dispute between Buffalo Trace and the estate about the mash and the bottling got much lower and much harder to find (it disappeared from Washington liquor stores and I’ve almost completely stopped seeing it at restaurants/bars). I think about it and miss it at least every other week. My wife and I were in Southern California a couple weeks ago and went out to dinner in Laguna Beach at an otherwise unremarkable restaurant and they had Elmer T. Lee in their bar and it was by far the best part of the meal. It was the first time I’d had it in probably 5 years and it was as good as I’ve remembered.

    Old-old favorite used to be Black Maple Hill, which was a small batch run that had Van Winkle involvement but for a much lower (although still kind of premium) price. But then production changed hands twice and the flavor profile completely changed (and it also got much lower availability) and I haven’t had it in at least 6-7 years. There are versions of the old bottling still floating around for stupid prices so I’ve resigned myself to the fact that I won’t have it again.

    But enough about the things you won’t drink anymore.

    Woodford Reserve is a wonderfully reliable drinking bourbon. With or without ice it works well, suits a lot of palettes, not cheap but not terribly expensive, and widely available. Woodford on a big rock is my standard cocktail order and you can get it (maybe with regular ice instead of the big rock) almost anywhere. It’s the bourbon served on Delta flights (for free - or, at least, included in the price of the ticket - in the comfort+ seats) and since I travel a bunch for work it’s a reliable go to. I’ve had more Woodford 30,000 feet in the air than anywhere else.

    Blanton’s is a great treat bourbon. They’ve also been on a somewhat lower production run so it’s less reliably available at restaurants and bars, but still a relatively common find. Flavor is just a little more refined and richer than the Woodford. But I don’t find it so much better than other offerings that I want to invest the extra $ (probably 15-20/bottle) to get a bottle for home very often.

    I have been on an Elijah Craig kick of late. They have a bunch of offerings but their standard has a good, rich flavor profile without being too harsh - it drinks smooth and not overly sweet.

    If you live near a Total Wine, they have had some bourbons that I haven’t seen elsewhere that I have become a fan of. One - Two Stars - is at a really good price point for its quality. Lacks some of the refinement of the ones above (definitely drinks better over ice than neat) and is less rich in flavor but a really easy and enjoyable drink, particularly for the cost. Another - Black Ridge - is the closest to Elmer T. Lee that I’ve had and only slightly more expensive, but I’ve never seen it anywhere other than Total Wine.

    Someone mentioned Four Roses above - really like both their Small Batch and Single Barrel bottlings, although I’m less of a fan of their standard run. The Small Batch I think is the best combination of quality and price in their production.

    Other smaller runs that are worth a taste if you see them at a bar are Rowan’s Creek and Noah’s Mill. They come at higher proofs - one I think is around 114 proof - and they’re really good sipping bourbons.

    I share mph’s view on the Pappy - it’s definitely good bourbon, but not so much better than others you can get to make it worth the price.
    Just be you. You is enough. - K, 4/5/10, 0:13.8 to play, 60-59 Duke.

    You're all jealous hypocrites. - Titus on Laettner

    You see those guys? Animals. They're animals. - SIU Coach Chris Lowery, on Duke

  4. #24
    Likely more a whiskey than bourbon, anyone have opinions on Tin Cup?

    I was gifted a bottle a while back.
    From what I can tell its a bit spicy due to a high percentage of rye in the grain bill.

    Since it seems like there are a very good number of bourbon experts on DBR, as an infrequent and inexperienced bourbon drinker, I’d welcome thoughts on bourbons to try, and how you figured out which bourbons you liked and why.

    I can read articles like this, and process the words without actually being able to translate what I read into a bourbon drinking experience:

    https://coolmaterial.com/food-drink/...at-least-once/

    https://gearpatrol.com/2019/03/22/best-bourbon-whiskey/

    https://gearpatrol.com/2019/01/26/be...oof-bourbon-2/

    https://gearpatrol.com/2019/08/22/no...urbon-whiskey/

    One distillery not generally available in NC is New Riff. Anyone tried it?
    Last edited by fuse; 08-29-2019 at 06:38 AM.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN.
    Woodford's Double Oaked

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Manhattan
    I'm a huge fan of...

    W.L. Weller Old Antique: An amazing wheated bourbon, meaning the secondary grain they use in the mash bill is wheat instead of rye. There are a few Weller varieties out there but the Antique is bottled at 107 proof as opposed to the Special Reserve which is bottled at 90. Most bottles will run you somewhere around $100 or so. There's also a great 12-year bottle that's up in the $200-$300 range.

    Pinhook: Pinhook is a craft distillery based in Kentucky that partners with horse racing stables in the state. Each lot release is capped at a few thousand bottles, and they release a few times a year. The notes are adjusted from bottle to bottle, so most drinkers will favor one release more than others. They've also started to produce rye whiskey as well.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by pfrduke View Post
    This is a topic near and dear to my soul (and my mouth and stomach). I have many thoughts ... Woodford Reserve is a wonderfully reliable drinking bourbon. With or without ice it works well, suits a lot of palettes, not cheap but not terribly expensive, and widely available. ... Someone mentioned Four Roses above - really like both their Small Batch and Single Barrel bottlings, although Iím less of a fan of their standard run ...
    I recall KY native John McIntyre (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M...e_(copyeditor)) writing one time that his standard is Old Forrester, and when he's feeling flush, Maker's, and when he actually *is* flush, Woodford.

    I agree with Woodford at the top of the list. Contra pfr, I prefer Four Roses standard to the small batch. I think all in all I like less complexity. Also less potency -- Wild Turkey 81 rather than 101. Bulleit is solid. Had Basil Hayden for the first time recently -- very, very light and unobtrusive, almost a whisper. I find Maker's too sweet. So, Woodford, Wild Turkey 81, Four Roses, and good old regular white label Beam are often on the shelf. I've never found the inclination or money to indulge in the crazy expensive ones or the super-potent -- have had Rare Breed (108 proof?). And I'm probably unusual in that I almost always mix with diet ginger ale (which no bar ever has) -- again, as the 'diet' part lessens the sweetness (at least in my mind).

    I usu post this essay in the Carolina FB game thread -- it should be read annually: https://www.claremont.org/crb/article/bourbon-neat/

    I very much agree with Percy's take on potency, and how it's all about the aesthetic, and the ability of bourbon to unlock certain philosophical truths or to help one make sense of the world.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I recall KY native John McIntyre (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M...e_(copyeditor)) writing one time that his standard is Old Forrester, and when he's feeling flush, Maker's, and when he actually *is* flush, Woodford.

    I agree with Woodford at the top of the list. Contra pfr, I prefer Four Roses standard to the small batch. I think all in all I like less complexity. Also less potency -- Wild Turkey 81 rather than 101. Bulleit is solid. Had Basil Hayden for the first time recently -- very, very light and unobtrusive, almost a whisper. I find Maker's too sweet. So, Woodford, Wild Turkey 81, Four Roses, and good old regular white label Beam are often on the shelf. I've never found the inclination or money to indulge in the crazy expensive ones or the super-potent -- have had Rare Breed (108 proof?). And I'm probably unusual in that I almost always mix with diet ginger ale (which no bar ever has) -- again, as the 'diet' part lessens the sweetness (at least in my mind).

    I usu post this essay in the Carolina FB game thread -- it should be read annually: https://www.claremont.org/crb/article/bourbon-neat/

    I very much agree with Percy's take on potency, and how it's all about the aesthetic, and the ability of bourbon to unlock certain philosophical truths or to help one make sense of the world.
    To paraphrase Capt. Mojo's sig:

    Q: "Which bourbon is your favorite?

    A: "The fifth one because it makes me fearless and handsome."
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    To paraphrase Capt. Mojo's sig:

    Q: "Which bourbon is your favorite?

    A: "The fifth one because it makes me fearless and handsome."
    New life goal is to observe devildeac after his fifth bourbon. 🤣🤣🤣

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    New life goal is to observe devildeac after his fifth bourbon. 🤣🤣🤣
    Funny stuff.

    Or, after his 5th Dogfish Head World Wide Stout (oak barrel-aged with vanilla, of course, to keep this *kinda* related to bourbon)...

    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I recall KY native John McIntyre (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M...e_(copyeditor)) writing one time that his standard is Old Forrester, and when he's feeling flush, Maker's, and when he actually *is* flush, Woodford.
    I really like Old Forester, another well flavored and surprisingly smooth bourbon at a good price point. Have also had some of their other bottlings, including the Statesman and the 1897 (which comes in at 100 proof) and enjoy them all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    Bulleit is solid.
    Agree - I like both the bourbon and the rye. This is my favorite for a Manhattan, on the few occasions I have bourbon in something other than straight form (my usual experience with bourbon cocktails is that they look good on the page but taste like some form of watered down bourbon. Some notable exceptions are a Lion's Tail (bourbon, allspice dram, lime) and a Paper Plane (bourbon, amaro, lemon)).

    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    Had Basil Hayden for the first time recently -- very, very light and unobtrusive, almost a whisper.
    Completely agree with this, and I don't like Basil Hayden for this reason. It tastes like almost nothing. Doesn't give you the flavor one normally looks for in a bourbon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I usu post this essay in the Carolina FB game thread -- it should be read annually: https://www.claremont.org/crb/article/bourbon-neat/

    I very much agree with Percy's take on potency, and how it's all about the aesthetic, and the ability of bourbon to unlock certain philosophical truths or to help one make sense of the world.
    What a delightful read - thanks for sharing.
    Just be you. You is enough. - K, 4/5/10, 0:13.8 to play, 60-59 Duke.

    You're all jealous hypocrites. - Titus on Laettner

    You see those guys? Animals. They're animals. - SIU Coach Chris Lowery, on Duke

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Funny stuff.

    Or, after his 5th Dogfish Head World Wide Stout (oak barrel-aged with vanilla, of course, to keep this *kinda* related to bourbon)...

    I donít believe you could consume 60oz of DFH WWS in any reasonable time frame.
    By reasonable, I mean in under ten hours.

    While I wouldnít recommend it, you could probably finish five shots of bourbon in a couple of hours and let the hilarity ensue from there. 🤣

  13. #33
    Old Forester is my choice for mixers. Great value and I donít feel like I am putting ketchup on a filet.

    Woodford for sure, and the tour if you are in Lexington is top notch. I agree on the Weller as well, but itís hard to find. It is actually the same barreling as Papi, but isnít casked as long.

    Had some good Jefferson Ocean recently. I haven't taken the time to dwell on it enough (need more I guess).

  14. #34
    At our house, the standard staple is Knob Creek, sometimes alternating with Woodford Reserve; and I keep a bottle of Blanton's on hand for special guests or occasions. But another bourbon I've really enjoyed in recent years in Breckenridge, which is distilled in Colorado. For something uniquely satisfying, I recommend Breckenridge Port Cask Finish . . . if you can find it.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    I donít believe you could consume 60oz of DFH WWS in any reasonable time frame.
    By reasonable, I mean in under ten hours.

    While I wouldnít recommend it, you could probably finish five shots of bourbon in a couple of hours and let the hilarity ensue from there. 🤣
    Reasonable/true on all of the above. But, I'm not going to try either .
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  16. #36
    Now we're talking.

    I like Woodford reserve and Knob Creek. I make mixed drinks with what I buy at costco; Usually Bulleit or Makers but sometimes Basil Hayden. My go to mixed drink in the summer is a mint julep and in the winter it is a bourbon hot toddy. I will do old fashions if I have an orange lying around. I like a Kentucky Mule if I have ginger beer.

    I sip Blanton's when I feel like having something a little "nicer" though I don't think it's much better than some of the less expensive offerings.

    I bought a bottle of I.W. Harper a while back and really liked it. I haven't found it since though.

    I was at a charity event where a guy bought a bottle of Old Rip VanWinkle for a couple grand. He really had no clue what he was buying. He opened it and proceeded to give anyone a drink that wanted it because "you have to finish it once you open it because it doesn't keep well". What? Anyway, I had mine neat. It was good, but I wouldn't drop $1000 on a bottle.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Hot'Lanta... home of the Falcons!
    I'm a Scotch man, myself-- single malts. Love the peaty ones like Lagavulin and Laphroaig Lore.

    For folks who are new to all this, here is a short article explaining the difference between bourbon and scotch.

    The main difference between scotch and whisky is geographic, but also ingredients and spellings. Scotch is whisky made in Scotland, while bourbon is whiskey made in the U.S.A, generally Kentucky. Scotch is made mostly from malted barley, while bourbon is distilled from corn. If youíre in England and ask for a whisky, youíll get Scotch. But in Ireland, youíll get Irish whiskey (yep, they spell it differently for a little colour).

    On this side of the pond, we have our own local color, too. The difference between Tennessee Whiskey, like Jack Danielís, for example, and Bourbon is that after the spirit is distilled, Tennessee Whiskey is filtered through sugar-maple charcoal. This filtering, known as the Lincoln County Process, is what distinguishes Tennessee Whiskey from your average Bourbon, like Jim Beam. The name, Bourbon, comes from an area known as Old Bourbon, around what is now Bourbon County, Kentucky.
    I don't know what you are doing right now, but if you aren't listening to the DBR Podcast, you're doing it wrong.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Compliments to the responsible party for the thread title change.

    Next up, Ymm, Scotch and/or Ymm, Wine?

    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonEvans View Post
    I'm a Scotch man, myself-- single malts. Love the peaty ones like Lagavulin and Laphroaig Lore.

    For folks who are new to all this, here is a short article explaining the difference between bourbon and scotch.
    The smokiness / peatiness of scotch makes it less approachable for me.

    I do think one of the greatest names of all time is this brand of scotch: Knockando.

    (If its no obvious, at least in my head itís pronounced No Can Do)

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Deeetroit City
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    The smokiness / peatiness of scotch makes it less approachable for me.

    I do think one of the greatest names of all time is this brand of scotch: Knockando.

    (If its no obvious, at least in my head itís pronounced No Can Do)
    Back in my Scotch drinking days over 20 years ago, there was a comma: "No, Can Do"

Similar Threads

  1. Bourbon Barrel Aged Wines
    By devildeac in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 10-28-2016, 10:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •