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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC

    Bird Population Status Of Our Local Feeder Birds

    Have been talking with my ornithologist friend about some trends I've noticed in local populations of some of our more popular songbirds. Some are year round residents, others are Spring and Summer breeders, still others just overwinter here.
    Here are some stats about those birds.

    Northern cardinal.
    Currently abundant throughout the state, with an increasing trend.

    Eastern towhee
    Fairly common. Numbers show an slight increase after decades of decline.

    Eastern goldfinch.
    Common, population stable. Increasing near coastal areas.

    American robin.
    Abundant, more common in winter, as the local population is augmented by migrants from northern states.

    Indigo bunting.
    Common, population increasing in mountains. Summer breeder.

    Painted bunting.
    Fairly common along coastal areas, rare inland..Some increase noted. Summer breeder.

    Pine siskin.
    Fairly common winter visitor. Some decline noted.

    House finch.
    Western invasive species now common here year round.

    Purple finch.
    Winter visitor. Some decline in recent years.

    Carolina wren.
    Common year round resident. Population stable or increasing.

    Eastern bluebird.
    Now fairly common after years of decline.

    Blue jay.
    Still common, but some decline noted in recent years.

    Northern mockingbird.
    Abundant year round resident.

    Carolina chickadee.
    Abundant, usually first bird at feeders.

    Tufted titmouse.
    Abundant, travels in mixed flocks with chickadees and downy woodpeckers in winter.

    These are just a few of our local birds that are popular birds at feeders. If you need any info on others feel free to ask..

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Oregon
    Pine Siskin is known for being irregular in its winter habits. Reduced numbers in the short term do not necessarily mean the species is declining overall. Wikipedia:

    Migration by this bird is highly variable, probably related to food supply. Large numbers may move south in some years; hardly any in others. This species is one of a few species that are considered "irruptive winter finches" because of the high variability of their movements based on the success of crops from year to year.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Neals384 View Post
    Pine Siskin is known for being irregular in its winter habits. Reduced numbers in the short term do not necessarily mean the species is declining overall. Wikipedia:
    Pine siskins numbers are erratic,as you say, but there has been a decreasing trend in the numbers of wintering birds here for several years.
    http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/...species_id=549

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