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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Quote Originally Posted by jacone21 View Post
    It's not a word... but I'm really hating the current trend where people end every sentence by raising the pitch of the last wORD. It's like every sentence is a quEstION. I really wish they wouldn't do thAT. Do you know what I mEAN?

    I'm hearing it from 8th graders to soccer Moms these days and it grates on my nerves. Where did that originate?
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    It's teenage speak, and mostly teenage girl speak, and I think it peaked about 5-8 years ago, to be honest. In other words, I heard it a lot more back then than I do now.

    In those days I actually had to take individual medical students aside and tell them that they needed to focus on not speaking like that when presenting patients on rounds because it made them sound childish and unprofessional. They seemed shocked. Most of them had no idea that they spoke like that, and had never really made a declarative statement in their entire lives.
    That's called "up talk" and is up there with "vocal fry", according to a 2014 TIME magazine article, as one of the more annoying and self-defeating voice habits used primarily by women.

    http://time.com/2820087/3-speech-hab...ob-interviews/

    You're welcome!
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  2. #102
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    That's called "up talk" and is up there with "vocal fry", according to a 2014 TIME magazine article, as one of the more annoying and self-defeating voice habits used primarily by women.

    http://time.com/2820087/3-speech-hab...ob-interviews/

    You're welcome!
    Upspeak and vocal fry are things I had never paid attention to until I learned what they were. Now I can't unhear it everywhere and it may drive me to lunacy.

    Upspeak suggests a level of insecurity on the part of the speaker. Vocal fry is disinterested, lazy speech. Young folks in particular don't realize the subtext that these vocal mannerism communicate to the (unfortunate) listener.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Someone mentioned up thread, "My pleasure." That's nicer than "No problem" to my ears. "My pleasure" sounds like "I'm happy to do it" whereas "No problem" sounds like "Meh, it really didn't put me out to help you." I'd be happy with "My pleasure" as a substitute to "You're welcome."
    I've noticed they say this at Chic-Fil-A a lot. I often wondered was it the company policy, or did it just catch on, and other employees started doing it. I agree, "my pleasure" sounds like a person that enjoys their job, and was genuinely glad they could help you today. Chic-fil-a has a ton of personal touches in the way they run their restaurants that definitely sets them apart from other fast food places. Their employees are always neatly dressed, and their uniforms look clean and professional all the time.

    "No Problem" sounds like, meh, don't worry, I was only mildly irritated at having to do my job by bringing you a fork.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Brooklet, GA
    I've only really started to notice the uptalk in my coworkers for a year or so. I guess it takes a while for those types of language trends to make it to the gnat infested South Georgia flatwoods. The good news is my mother still doesn't speak that way. She's more of a "I'm fixintagoda walmart." type.

  5. #105
    This isn't a word pet peeve, but more of a phrase that grates on my nerves...

    "I seen it."

  6. #106
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    Upspeak and vocal fry are things I had never paid attention to until I learned what they were. Now I can't unhear it everywhere and it may drive me to lunacy...
    I'm long-familiar with "uptalk" but had never heard of "vocal fry" till this thread.

    I've noticed that certain upper middle class women -- think of a mid-30s mom wearing aviator sunglasses pulling up to a very expensive private elementary in a very big SUV (and blocking my path to work, but I digress) -- using what seems to be an affected raspiness: "Jen, you are a rock star for agreeing to get Zooey/Chloe ..." Is that affected raspiness "vocal fry"? A subset of "vocal fry" or on the continuum towards "vocal fry"? Or is "vocal fry" something more egregious? The examples I'm seeing on YouTube make "vocal fry" seem like a more extreme sound (though equally annoying as the affected raspiness I've noticed).

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I'm long-familiar with "uptalk" but had never heard of "vocal fry" till this thread.

    I've noticed that certain upper middle class women -- think of a mid-30s mom wearing aviator sunglasses pulling up to a very expensive private elementary in a very big SUV (and blocking my path to work, but I digress) -- using what seems to be an affected raspiness: "Jen, you are a rock star for agreeing to get Zooey/Chloe ..." Is that affected raspiness "vocal fry"? A subset of "vocal fry" or on the continuum towards "vocal fry"? Or is "vocal fry" something more egregious? The examples I'm seeing on YouTube make "vocal fry" seem like a more extreme sound (though equally annoying as the affected raspiness I've noticed).
    It's that guttural sound in the pauses that is vocal fry. I believe it is a technical term from sound engineering, but I could be mistaken.

    At any rate, it has nothing at all to do with the particular words and everything to do with how they are said.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I'm long-familiar with "uptalk" but had never heard of "vocal fry" till this thread.

    I've noticed that certain upper middle class women -- think of a mid-30s mom wearing aviator sunglasses pulling up to a very expensive private elementary in a very big SUV (and blocking my path to work, but I digress) -- using what seems to be an affected raspiness: "Jen, you are a rock star for agreeing to get Zooey/Chloe ..." Is that affected raspiness "vocal fry"? A subset of "vocal fry" or on the continuum towards "vocal fry"? Or is "vocal fry" something more egregious? The examples I'm seeing on YouTube make "vocal fry" seem like a more extreme sound (though equally annoying as the affected raspiness I've noticed).
    That's vocal fry to me. It bothers me sometimes but not always. It depends on how egregious it is and also how frequently it is used.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    New Orleans, Louisiana
    I bristle at hearing the words "Thank you" (probably because I hear it so rarely) and will say something that I consider neutral in instinctive response: "Don't mention it" or "Sure," but most likely "No problem." When I do say "You're welcome," it's only after a serious pause and consideration. It does not come naturally.

    If I had to explain it, I would say that while I was taught to say "Thank you" to others, that lesson in etiquette did not extend to continuing the polite conversation. So I neither expect much of a response when I say it, or provide much of one when I hear it. I mostly want to wipe the slate clean.

    There are, of course, times when I am in unusual need of assistance, and will make the effort to express my thanks and appreciation to those who offer help. Similarly, I may go above and beyond the standard and socially acceptable level of assistance to help others in special situations, and will make the effort to finish that connection with thoughtful words. But note that both times I said "effort," which takes me out of my effortless, solitary, and private mode.

    Quote Originally Posted by left_hook_lacey View Post
    I've noticed they say this at Chic-Fil-A a lot. I often wondered was it the company policy, or did it just catch on, and other employees started doing it. I agree, "my pleasure" sounds like a person that enjoys their job, and was genuinely glad they could help you today. Chic-fil-a has a ton of personal touches in the way they run their restaurants that definitely sets them apart from other fast food places. Their employees are always neatly dressed, and their uniforms look clean and professional all the time.

    "No Problem" sounds like, meh, don't worry, I was only mildly irritated at having to do my job by bringing you a fork.
    Right on cue: The Real Reason Chick-fil-A Employees Say "My Pleasure" (Taste of Home magazine)

    Though there’s nothing in the official Chick-fil-A employee training on saying “my pleasure,” according to a Reddit user who works there, it’s still an important part of the company culture. “‘You’re welcome’ seems too indifferent, and we’re told to use elevated language,” the employee says.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    I love all words, irregardless of how putrid they may be.

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!
    Anyone that has uttered the fake word - "anywho" should immediately cease to exist.

    All corporate lingo users need to be keelhauled.

    "How come" sounds like something a four year old would say. Grow up.

    I am of the age where "Thank you" and "You're welcome" are like peanut butter and jelly. There is no questioning intent. It simply shows that you were raised properly. "No problem" rubs me the wrong way because it sounds insolent. I do appreciate the previous explanations because it shows me that it is meant to be polite. Disingenuous or not, "my pleasure" is a very welcome and kind sounding response.

    Now about my lawn...

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Thought of another "word" I hate: Guesstimate.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    "Unauthorized access prohibited" --- stipulated and universally true.

    "Wow, just wow" -- also mentioned upthread. This can, and must (if accurate), be shortened to "Wow"

    "Historically" -- this has somehow become a synonym for "very"

    "Take" -- when used to describe opinions, especially in sports

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    "Unauthorized access prohibited" --- stipulated and universally true.

    "Wow, just wow" -- also mentioned upthread. This can, and must (if accurate), be shortened to "Wow"

    "Historically" -- this has somehow become a synonym for "very"

    "Take" -- when used to describe opinions, especially in sports
    "Resume safe speed" on highway signs.

    "Trespassing after 5 P.M. is prohibited." So, before five, it's okay?

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, within a couple of miles of Cameron
    I used to count the number of times 'iconic' was used on the morning news shows, over the past 2-3 years...seems to be a requirement to have it used at least once a day. The word needs to be retired.

    'I'm good' in answer to 'how are you doing?' just grates on me, seems just a wrong use of the words, should be 'I'm fine', or 'well.

    'price point'; what's wrong with plain old 'price'?

    When did everyone start to 'graduate college'? I graduated FROM high school, and graduated FROM college.

    I also don't like the use of verbs as nouns: 'What's the ask?' Why not use the perfectly fine 'request'?

    And then, my all time pet peeve (and I've never heard a good explanation): Why do announcers say "and they have pulled [to] within 2 ", when the score is 50-48. They are exactly two points behind. They are 'within 3 points' of the lead, right? (oops, shouldn't have said 'right?')

    Annoying, but not exactly on the same levels as all the above, someone saying, 'can I ask you a question?' and then asking it anyway. Why not just ask the question? I know it is intended to be polite, but I'm often tempted to say, 'no".

    Enough for today. Can't possibly achieve the level of curmudgeon-hood that DevilDeac enjoys!
    JStuart
    Last edited by JStuart; 05-24-2018 at 04:46 PM. Reason: adjusting my phrases

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by JStuart View Post
    I used to count the number of times 'iconic' was used on the morning news shows, over the past 2-3 years...seems to be a requirement to have it used at least once a day. The word needs to be retired.

    'I'm good' in answer to 'how are you doing?' just grates on me, seems just a wrong use of the words, should be 'I'm fine', or 'well.

    'price point'; what's wrong with plain old 'price'?

    When did everyone start to 'graduate college'? I graduated FROM high school, and graduated FROM college.

    I also don't like the use of verbs as nouns: 'What's the ask?' Why not use the perfectly fine 'request'?

    And then, my all time pet peeve (and I've never heard a good explanation): Why do announcers say "and they have pulled [to] within 2 ", when the score is 50-48. They are exactly two points behind. They are 'within 3 points' of the lead, right? (oops, shouldn't have said 'right?')

    Annoying, but not exactly on the same levels as all the above, someone saying, 'can I ask you a question?' and then asking it anyway. Why not just ask the question? I know it is intended to be polite, but I'm often tempted to say, 'no".

    Enough for today. Can't possibly achieve the level of curmudgeon-hood that DevilDeac enjoys!
    JStuart
    At your service:

    beer-FoundersOldComudgen.jpg

    And, you're welcome. Or, is that "no problem?"
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by bedeviled View Post
    Word I dislike: disorientated

    Words I could go either way on: cleave, nonplussed, inflammable, weathered

    Word I like: catawampus
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Catawampus is fantastic!
    Why do y'all keep spelling cattywampus wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by JNort View Post
    I'm saying regardless of its origins, that is how it comes across.

    In my head you're welcome = you should be thankful I did this.

    No problem = hey I don't mind helping at all or anytime.




    To clarify this is just my opinion on how I feel when someone says this to me and how I feel in reverse. This is why I always say something along the lines of "No problem", "anytime", "think nothing of it", or "my pleasure".
    Ugh...Chick-fil-a flashbacks. I will never again say "my pleasure" as a response to anything at any time, unless it is dripping with sarcasm. Should you hear me say it, I am either having some kind of aneurysm and need immediate medical attention, or I hated doing whatever it is you're thanking me for so much that I have lost my grip on reality and entered my own, in which all food is chicken.

    I had lots to add to the "you're welcome" discussion, but then everyone else said it first. I will go ahead and assert that if you find yourself taking issue with the phrasing of a response to "thank you" you are probably missing the point of the words. There are probably situations in which "no problem" lacks the appropriate sense of formality, but it doesn't seem like this tangent is necessarily constrained to those times.

  18. #118
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    "Unauthorized access prohibited" --- stipulated and universally true.
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    "Resume safe speed" on highway signs.

    "Trespassing after 5 P.M. is prohibited." So, before five, it's okay?
    "Tampering with, disabling, or destroying the smoke detectors located in the lavatories is prohibited by law."

    "Tampering with" is sufficient.

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    A word I like but may not understand is "droll". I've always understood it to mean a sort of dry wit. And it's used to mean that, but the original (and perhaps only) definition is amusingly odd, whimsically comical, or buffoonish. http://grammarist.com/usage/droll/

    In the post above, I first used "droll" to describe Miss Manners, given her dry wit, but then replaced droll with "witty."
    I read a lot of books a little too advanced for me when I was very young (5-8 years old or so), but rarely asked questions about what things meant. This lead to some fairly interesting misinterpretations of entire stories. At the time, I read "droll" as similar to "drab" (so anyone described as droll took on a somewhat Eeyore persona for me) which just isn't quite.

    My favorite, though, is the lightbulb moment I had whenever I finally learned the military meaning of the word "battery" (years after having first read it in that context). I always thought the fixation on power storage in space battles seemed a little strange, though.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North of Durham
    Quote Originally Posted by JStuart View Post
    Annoying, but not exactly on the same levels as all the above, someone saying, 'can I ask you a question?' and then asking it anyway. Why not just ask the question? I know it is intended to be polite, but I'm often tempted to say, 'no".
    I once had an interview where the interviewer asked me "can I ask you a question" before each question. At that point in the process, I was fairly sure I had no interest in working for the company, but I managed to restrain myself and not make a smart-aleck remark like "that's generally what one does in an interview" or "no." Several years later we ended up working in the same department at a different company but he did not remember me.

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