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  1. #901
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Japanese does the same thing. These languaues are known as agglutinating languages. There are some linguists who believe that Japanese is actually more closely related to Norweigian than it is to any Asian language.

    An example... in Japanese the word for red is akai. The root of the word is aka. You can say 'if it had not been red' by just sticking suffixes on, like this: akakunakattanaraba.
    Sort of reminds me of what a good idea I thought it was that taking a foreign language course was NOT part of getting an engineering degree at Duke. I did manage to get fairly conversational in Portuguese while working in Brasil - but I don't think I'd have ever made any progress in the agglutinating languages.

    Agglutinating?? Wow, where else would you find that other than the thread for words you like or dislike?

  2. #902
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Japanese does the same thing. These languaues are known as agglutinating languages. There are some linguists who believe that Japanese is actually more closely related to Norweigian than it is to any Asian language.

    An example... in Japanese the word for red is akai. The root of the word is aka. You can say 'if it had not been red' by just sticking suffixes on, like this: akakunakattanaraba.
    rsvman, I tried to spork you, etc. Posts like that are why I love this board; you never know what you're gonna learn.

  3. #903
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Japanese does the same thing. These languaues are known as agglutinating languages. There are some linguists who believe that Japanese is actually more closely related to Norweigian than it is to any Asian language.

    An example... in Japanese the word for red is akai. The root of the word is aka. You can say 'if it had not been red' by just sticking suffixes on, like this: akakunakattanaraba.
    To make it more fun, they have 3 alphabets.

  4. #904
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by DukieInKansas View Post
    To make it more fun, they have 3 alphabets.
    Kinda. They have two syllabaries and they also use characters they borrowed from Chinese.

    Strictly speaking they are syllabaries and not alphabets because each symbol is an entire syllable in and of itself. The symbols in the syllabaries are meaningless, much like our alphabet.

    By way of contrast, the symbols they borrowed and sometimes adapted from Chinese all have meaning, and not just sound, attached to them. Finally, to ramp up the fun, almost all the characters they borrowed from Chinese have at least two different readings; in other words there are at least two different sounds to use when reading them (but in any given context, only one of them is correct). To read a newapaper, you need to be able to recognlze and understand at least 1800 of these symbols.

  5. #905
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Winston’Salem
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Kinda. They have two syllabaries and they also use characters they borrowed from Chinese.

    Strictly speaking they are syllabaries and not alphabets because each symbol is an entire syllable in and of itself. The symbols in the syllabaries are meaningless, much like our alphabet.

    By way of contrast, the symbols they borrowed and sometimes adapted from Chinese all have meaning, and not just sound, attached to them. Finally, to ramp up the fun, almost all the characters they borrowed from Chinese have at least two different readings; in other words there are at least two different sounds to use when reading them (but in any given context, only one of them is correct). To read a newapaper, you need to be able to recognlze and understand at least 1800 of these symbols.
    I've this creeeeeeping . . . . suspicion that, back in the day, someone might have served a Mormon mission (sorry, "a mission on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"; gotta get the 2020 nomenclature right) in Japan. As devildeac might say, "Amirite?"

    Oh, and "nomenclature" is also a word I like.
    "Amazing what a minute can do."

  6. #906
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tripping William View Post
    I've this creeeeeeping . . . . suspicion that, back in the day, someone might have served a Mormon mission (sorry, "a mission on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"; gotta get the 2020 nomenclature right) in Japan. As devildeac might say, "Amirite?"

    Oh, and "nomenclature" is also a word I like.
    Bingo.

    Also have a bachelor's degree in Japanese.

  7. #907
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Winston’Salem
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Bingo.

    Also have a bachelor's degree in Japanese.
    Bet I can guess from what university. (I might have a same-gene-pool relationship with the current university prez.)
    "Amazing what a minute can do."

  8. #908
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tripping William View Post
    Bet I can guess from what university. (I might have a same-gene-pool relationship with the current university prez.)
    You almost certainly could.

  9. #909
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Detritus.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  10. #910
    Quote Originally Posted by rsvman View Post
    Kinda. They have two syllabaries and they also use characters they borrowed from Chinese.

    Strictly speaking they are syllabaries and not alphabets because each symbol is an entire syllable in and of itself. The symbols in the syllabaries are meaningless, much like our alphabet.

    By way of contrast, the symbols they borrowed and sometimes adapted from Chinese all have meaning, and not just sound, attached to them. Finally, to ramp up the fun, almost all the characters they borrowed from Chinese have at least two different readings; in other words there are at least two different sounds to use when reading them (but in any given context, only one of them is correct). To read a newapaper, you need to be able to recognlze and understand at least 1800 of these symbols.
    I was in elementary school at the time - alphabet was probably the easier way to describe it to us.

  11. #911
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    draff-the damp remains of malt after brewing often used as an appetizer or supplement in animal rations

    Hmm, this might be applicable somewhere else, too.

    An additional/alternative definition would also apply in yet another location.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  12. #912
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    I'd tell ya, but then I'd have to kill ya
    Not making this up. Gotta love the Brits.

    Cockwomble - (noun) A person, usually male, prone to making outrageously stupid statements and/or inappropriate behaviour while generally having a very high opinion of their own wisdom and importance.

  13. #913
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by dudog84 View Post
    Not making this up. Gotta love the Brits.

    Cockwomble - (noun) A person, usually male, prone to making outrageously stupid statements and/or inappropriate behaviour while generally having a very high opinion of their own wisdom and importance.
    As opposed to a buddywomble, which is an affable bloke with a distaste for New Hampshire.

  14. #914
    Just learned this word. It's a good one! Apophasis:

    A•poph•a•sis
    n. Allusion to something by denying that it will be mentioned, as in "I will not bring up my opponent's questionable financial dealings."
    n. In rhetoric, denial of an intention to speak of something which is at the same time hinted or insinuated; paralipsis (which see).
    n. A figure by which a speaker formally declines to take notice of a favorable point, but in such a manner as to produce the effect desired. [For example, see Mark Antony's oration. Shak., Julius Cæsar, iii. 2.]

  15. #915
    Quote Originally Posted by BLPOG View Post
    Just learned this word. It's a good one! Apophasis:

    A•poph•a•sis
    n. Allusion to something by denying that it will be mentioned, as in "I will not bring up my opponent's questionable financial dealings."
    n. In rhetoric, denial of an intention to speak of something which is at the same time hinted or insinuated; paralipsis (which see).
    n. A figure by which a speaker formally declines to take notice of a favorable point, but in such a manner as to produce the effect desired. [For example, see Mark Antony's oration. Shak., Julius Cæsar, iii. 2.]
    Excellent word for these times. Sporks!

  16. #916
    Someone used 'gullywasher' today. Its one of those words you can see/feel what it describes. I like it.

  17. #917
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    As opposed to a buddywomble, which is an affable bloke with a distaste for New Hampshire.
    whoa, thanks for the shout out! Distaste may be too strong, we kind of see them as our idiot cousins, kind of like Randy Quaid in Christmas Vacation.

    It's been said (so it must be true) that English has twice as many words as any other tongue, which is a glorious thing.

    I just read a book in which the word "disorientated" was used several times, and was distressed to find that it is deemed quite acceptable. Balderdash I say!

  18. #918
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quaff is one we've been trying to use more over in the Ymm, Beer thread. I first read it in a Peanuts strip when I was a kid - "The World War II flying ace going to quaff a few root beers". Have liked that word ever since.
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  19. #919
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by Nrrrrvous View Post
    Quaff is one we've been trying to use more over in the Ymm, Beer thread. I first read it in a Peanuts strip when I was a kid - "The World War II flying ace going to quaff a few root beers". Have liked that word ever since.
    Yes, we are quite the civilized, congenial bunch over there .

    That may be where I first learned the word, too. I like quaff even more than imbibe.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  20. #920
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Yes, we are quite the civilized, congenial bunch over there .
    You misspelled "subversive." ;-)

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