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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Well, if we're going down that path, I don't like how "No problem" has taken the place of "You're welcome" in the common vernacular. For example, I ask a waiter to please do something like fill my water glass, I thank them, and they respond with "No problem." Well, it shouldn't be a problem because that's your job. A simple "You're welcome" will suffice. I'd actually prefer that they say nothing at all instead of "No problem." It REALLY bugs me.

    Now get off my lawn!
    I keep seeing people make this argument about no problem vs. you're welcome. I don't understand it. You could make the exact same argument the other way. "Of course I'm welcome, I am the customer and it's your job". I see now material difference between the 2.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    I keep seeing people make this argument about no problem vs. you're welcome. I don't understand it. You could make the exact same argument the other way. "Of course I'm welcome, I am the customer and it's your job". I see now material difference between the 2.
    "No problem," to me, implies that things would have been different had it been a problem.

    I only did it because it was easy.

    Besides, "you're welcome" has sufficed for centuries. If it ain't broke, . . . .

    And of course, someone out there absolutely hates "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    I keep seeing people make this argument about no problem vs. you're welcome. I don't understand it. You could make the exact same argument the other way. "Of course I'm welcome, I am the customer and it's your job". I see now material difference between the 2.
    I'm guessing you're a lot younger than I am. "You're welcome" is common courtesy and has been for many, many years. "No problem" is only a recent term that has, for no apparent reason that I've heard, taken its place.
    Last edited by Rich; 05-23-2018 at 03:00 PM. Reason: Jim beat me to it
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    I'm guessing you're a lot younger than I am. "You're welcome" is common courtesy and has been for many, many years. "No problem" is only a recent term that has, for no apparent reason that I've heard, taken its place.
    I'm 45. Both are just phrases that signal "an agreeable transaction has just been completed and your expression of gratitude is acknowledged" -- Yes, it's changing. But, that shouldn't really be a problem. Language is always changing.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    I'm guessing you're a lot younger than I am. "You're welcome" is common courtesy and has been for many, many years. "No problem" is only a recent term that has, for no apparent reason that I've heard, taken its place.
    I appreciate that you guys are being honest (sorry! one of the listed disliked words in this thread) in listing your reasons as "well, I don't actually have a reason, it's just the way I've always said it." But, it's still sort of a lame reason. "You're welcome" is sort of bizarre when you think about it. "No problem" seems to make more sense to me, and is closer to the "Of nothing" that's used in Spanish and French.

    A lot my like/dislike depends on context. For example, the word "actually". Fine to use in conversation, but written down in a formal document, it imparts no added value to a sentence.

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Well, if we're going down that path, I don't like how "No problem" has taken the place of "You're welcome" in the common vernacular. For example, I ask a waiter to please do something like fill my water glass, I thank them, and they respond with "No problem." Well, it shouldn't be a problem because that's your job. A simple "You're welcome" will suffice. I'd actually prefer that they say nothing at all instead of "No problem." It REALLY bugs me.

    Now get off my lawn!
    Quote Originally Posted by left_hook_lacey View Post
    BINGO! It's becoming an epidemic.

    And while we are on the subject, if a waitress brings me something and I say "thank you", please don't say, "No worries". We're not filming Crocodile Dundee IV, and you're not half as hip as you think you are.

    NOW! Get off MY lawn!
    Quote Originally Posted by RPS View Post
    "Of course" has also become ubiquitous in that setting. I dislike it slightly less than "No problem," but dislike it I do.
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    I keep seeing people make this argument about no problem vs. you're welcome. I don't understand it. You could make the exact same argument the other way. "Of course I'm welcome, I am the customer and it's your job". I see now material difference between the 2.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    I'm guessing you're a lot younger than I am. "You're welcome" is common courtesy and has been for many, many years. "No problem" is only a recent term that has, for no apparent reason that I've heard, taken its place.
    Quote Originally Posted by freshmanjs View Post
    I'm 45. Both are just phrases that signal "an agreeable transaction has just been completed and your expression of gratitude is acknowledged" -- Yes, it's changing. But, that shouldn't really be a problem. Language is always changing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wander View Post
    I appreciate that you guys are being honest (sorry! one of the listed disliked words in this thread) in listing your reasons as "well, I don't actually have a reason, it's just the way I've always said it." But, it's still sort of a lame reason. "You're welcome" is sort of bizarre when you think about it. "No problem" seems to make more sense to me, and is closer to the "Of nothing" that's used in Spanish and French.

    A lot my like/dislike depends on context. For example, the word "actually". Fine to use in conversation, but written down in a formal document, it imparts no added value to a sentence.
    Maybe this needs its own thread?

    I really like the words "you're welcome". And what I've noticed is that *hardly anybody* uses the phrase any more. As in, nobody. Listen to any radio or TV interview, and the host thanks the guest for coming on and being interviewed, and the guest *almost never* says "you're welcome." The guest says "thank you" in return or "glad to be here" or some such. Or, if you ever find yourself on a multi-party conference call, the host will say 'thank you' at the end followed by a chorus of 'thank you's' -- I like to throw in my one "you're welcome."

    It's started to really bug me how nobody says "you're welcome" anymore and I notice it all the time. It's like we're all now in a game of "thank you" one-upmanship -- "no, no, thank you".

    I like saying "you're welcome" because it recognizes the other person's politeness, and leaves it at that. There's a certain graciousness to being able to accept another's compliment or another's politeness without feeling I owe some sort of expression of thanks in return. It lets the other person's sentiment be the controlling one, and simply answered, without introducing my own sentiment (that may call for acknowledgement). It lets the original expression breathe.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Derm
    I second "disrespect" and "utilize" and will add:

    - "hopefully" and "badly" when not used as adverbs

    - "lay" and "laying" when should be "lie" and "lying"

    Don't get me started on corporate and sports talk...

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Wander View Post
    I appreciate that you guys are being honest (sorry! one of the listed disliked words in this thread) in listing your reasons as "well, I don't actually have a reason, it's just the way I've always said it." But, it's still sort of a lame reason.
    Actually, no one said that. Honestly.

    And your reason is just as lame.

    So, there.

    Get off my lawn.

    Note that "get off my lawn" is a traditional rejoinder, best responded to with "no problem."

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    Maybe this needs its own thread?

    I really like the words "you're welcome". And what I've noticed is that *hardly anybody* uses the phrase any more. As in, nobody. Listen to any radio or TV interview, and the host thanks the guest for coming on and being interviewed, and the guest *almost never* says "you're welcome." The guest says "thank you" in return or "glad to be here" or some such. Or, if you ever find yourself on a multi-party conference call, the host will say 'thank you' at the end followed by a chorus of 'thank you's' -- I like to throw in my one "you're welcome."

    It's started to really bug me how nobody says "you're welcome" anymore and I notice it all the time. It's like we're all now in a game of "thank you" one-upmanship -- "no, no, thank you".

    I like saying "you're welcome" because it recognizes the other person's politeness, and leaves it at that. There's a certain graciousness to being able to accept another's compliment or another's politeness without feeling I owe some sort of expression of thanks in return. It lets the other person's sentiment be the controlling one, and simply answered, without introducing my own sentiment (that may call for acknowledgement). It lets the original expression breathe.

    Count me in the group that hates the phrase "you're welcome" and prefers "No problem". I get a little agitated when someone says you're welcome to me, it sounds o so snobbish. It's like you're putting words or thoughts onto somebody regardless of what they actually think or feel.

    No problem makes it seem like you were grateful to help. This way seems better to me since you are projecting how you felt about the situation as opposed to deciding someone else's feeling on the matter
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by JNort View Post
    ... as opposed to deciding someone else's feeling on the matter
    I've never looked into the origin of the phrase "you're welcome" so I'm not sure if this is correct, but I understand the phrase to mean, in effect, "you are welcome to my presence at this interview" or "you are welcome to my service of filling your water glass any time" or "you are welcome to my time and presence on this interminable conference call." In other words, it is an expression of the speaker's frame of mind; it is not deciding someone else's feeling on the matter.

    I do not understand it to mean (about another) "you are feeling welcome."

    I see "no problem" as the phrase ascribing words/feelings to other people -- "your 'thanks' implied it was a problem for me and I'm here to tell you it was not a problem."

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Quote Originally Posted by Reilly View Post
    I've never looked into the origin of the phrase "you're welcome" so I'm not sure if this is correct, but I understand the phrase to mean, in effect, "you are welcome to my presence at this interview" or "you are welcome to my service of filling your water glass any time" or "you are welcome to my time and presence on this interminable conference call." In other words, it is an expression of the speaker's frame of mind; it is not deciding someone else's feeling on the matter.

    I do not understand it to mean (about another) "you are feeling welcome."

    I see "no problem" as the phrase ascribing words/feelings to other people -- "your 'thanks' implied it was a problem for me and I'm here to tell you it was not a problem."
    I'm saying regardless of its origins, that is how it comes across.

    In my head you're welcome = you should be thankful I did this.

    No problem = hey I don't mind helping at all or anytime.




    To clarify this is just my opinion on how I feel when someone says this to me and how I feel in reverse. This is why I always say something along the lines of "No problem", "anytime", "think nothing of it", or "my pleasure".
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    Actually, no one said that. Honestly.

    And your reason is just as lame.

    So, there.

    Get off my lawn.

    Note that "get off my lawn" is a traditional rejoinder, best responded to with "no problem."
    Maybe we should just go the way of the Dothraki and eliminate thanking. Or is that too hip of a reference for you guys?

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Quote Originally Posted by Wander View Post
    Maybe we should just go the way of the Dothraki and eliminate thanking. Or is that too hip of a reference for you guys?
    This board has plenty of GoT fans to get the reference. However I do kind of agree. I typically don't wanna be thanked for somthing unless it's from my boss at work for somthing. Outside of work I'm not big on people thanking me. At work it's a recognition thing and let's you know you've been noticed. In outside life I feel no need to be thanked for doing something that a rational or decent human being would do.

    Examples: I see you drop something and hand it to you. -Why thank me for that? It's in no way an inconvenience or an ordeal.

    I help you move items to your new home. - What friend wouldnt help another? I would expect the same.
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

  14. #74
    This one is easy, we'll start off with my absolute least favorite word:

    Tarheel

    and then we'll go with my absolute most favorite word:

    schadenfreude

    and then we combine them for a real gem:

    I take great schadenfreude at watching Tarheels lose.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by RPS View Post
    In my view, a key to analyzing legal briefs, or any argument for that matter, is to pay close attention to what comes after words like "honestly," "frankly" or "clearly." It is almost always anything but.
    “It is beyond cavil”

    Yeah, go screw yourself.
    1991 -- 1992 -- 2001 -- 2010 -- 2015

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Deeetroit City
    In Spanish, "you're welcome" is, and has been for at least decades, "de nada." Literal translation: "of nothing."

    Of course, "no problemo" has been a popular Spanish phrase for a long time.


    I guess I'm sensitive. I found I am using "no problem" more frequently in situations where my courtesy is seemingly unexpected.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Just down the road :(
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    I hate to nitpick your wife
    Quote Originally Posted by left_hook_lacey View Post
    Hey man, it's your funeral. ...[SNIP]... I'll still let her have it. Pick your battles and all that
    Shall we add 'uxorious' to the word list?

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    There is a corporate thing where people switch verbs and nouns. I hate it. Examples:

    - What's the solve for that
    - Solution the problem
    - What's the unlock for that?
    - I have a very simple ask for you

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Asheville
    I hate when people say ATM machine.
    2015 DBR Rosterbation Champion

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Quote Originally Posted by mattman91 View Post
    I hate when people say ATM machine.
    PIN number?

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