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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Quote Originally Posted by LasVegas View Post
    Hate: WebEx
    The term WebEx, when referring to online meetings and conferencing, is actually a proprietary trademark of Cisco. This is a term that people have begun to use generically to refer to any online meeting or web-based conferencing. If Cisco isn't careful, they could lose their goodwill and equity in the name if it is determined to be a generic term along the same lines as elevator and aspirin, once proprietary trademarks in the US (Aspirin remains a trademark in Canada and perhaps elsewhere, owned by Bayer). The owners of the marks Rollerblade, Xerox, and Kleenex have fought a similar battle over the years.
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  2. #42
    oe

    qat

    kex

    syzygy

    xi

    queue

    aerie

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Quote Originally Posted by left_hook_lacey View Post
    Yep, and every time we go there, my wife says, "Why name your restaurant after something that's not even a word?"
    I hate to nitpick your wife, but as much as it sucks, it definitely is a word, at least according to Merriam-Webster -- https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

    Is irregardless a word?

    Irregardless was popularized in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its increasingly widespread spoken use called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    I haaaaate the “word” webinar.
    This example reminds me of my second least-liked class of words: business portmanteaus. The problem is not the practice of creating a portmanteau, which can be a useful new word and might even be especially likely to come from the business world due to innovations. The problem is that so many of them are forced and unnecessary, not related to innovations but rather marketing. I find them maddening. Example: advertainment.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Troublemaker View Post
    oe

    qat

    kex

    syzygy

    xi

    queue

    aerie
    This guy Scrabbles.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by duke74 View Post
    Hate: Awesome and amazing. Especially when used by adults.
    "Either they're going down, or we are! Kirk out!"

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Deeetroit City
    Hate: "Disrespect" when used as a verb. "Myself" almost every time an athlete uses it.



    Love: "segue," cool word taught to me by a special young lady back before the alphabet had reached 26 letters.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn.Devil.91.92.01.10.15 View Post
    This guy Scrabbles.
    I like a lot of the silly Scrabble words, and they make it easy to win games against beginners. I'm cool with using letter names as words, i.e. "ar" for the letter R or, my favorite, "aitch" for the letter H. I'm OK with the Greek letters as words too, I think they're common enough in English to count.

    But some of them are absurd. Za is the worst offender. Does anyone actually call pizza that?

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    One of my faves is 'superfluous'-it just rolls off the tongue nicely.

    I read someone a dad taught his 5 year old to say "Behold!" instead of "Look!" Unfortunately I'm too late to do that with my kids, but I like it!

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Word I like: RBIs.

    That's the plural of RBI. RBI is not the plural of RBI.

    And while I'm on baseball, if I ever use the expression "plated a run," you have my permission to take me out back and put me out of my misery.

  11. #51
    This one might be slightly out of scope of the original question, but I'm posting it anyway.

    I've always disliked the use of the phrase "how come" instead of "why." I think I've only ever found two other people bothered by it. I especially disliked it when I was younger, maybe because it's used often by children, but I'm not sure. These days I'm a much more forgiving fellow. I've probably even used it a few times myself, which I'm somewhat ashamed to admit.

    I love the version used in the movie Idiocracy: "why come." The implication seems to be that people using "how come" are only a short step away from the people in the movie.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Quote Originally Posted by BLPOG View Post
    I've always disliked the use of the phrase "how come" instead of "why." I think I've only ever found two other people bothered by it. I especially disliked it when I was younger, maybe because it's used often by children, but I'm not sure. These days I'm a much more forgiving fellow. I've probably even used it a few times myself, which I'm somewhat ashamed to admit.
    Well, if we're going down that path, I don't like how "No problem" has taken the place of "You're welcome" in the common vernacular. For example, I ask a waiter to please do something like fill my water glass, I thank them, and they respond with "No problem." Well, it shouldn't be a problem because that's your job. A simple "You're welcome" will suffice. I'd actually prefer that they say nothing at all instead of "No problem." It REALLY bugs me.

    Now get off my lawn!
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    I hate to nitpick your wife, but as much as it sucks, it definitely is a word, at least according to Merriam-Webster -- https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

    Is irregardless a word?

    Irregardless was popularized in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its increasingly widespread spoken use called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.
    Hey man, it's your funeral.

    I guess the word is real, but the general usage spoken today is incorrect. I'll still let her have it. Pick your battles and all that.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Quote Originally Posted by PSurprise View Post
    I read someone a dad taught his 5 year old to say "Behold!" instead of "Look!" Unfortunately I'm too late to do that with my kids, but I like it!
    My children are all grown now. But when they were little I taught them, whenever someone said, "Carolina," to spit. I always enjoyed it immensely.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Well, if we're going down that path, I don't like how "No problem" has taken the place of "You're welcome" in the common vernacular. For example, I ask a waiter to please do something like fill my water glass, I thank them, and they respond with "No problem." Well, it shouldn't be a problem because that's your job. A simple "You're welcome" will suffice. I'd actually prefer that they say nothing at all instead of "No problem." It REALLY bugs me.

    Now get off my lawn!
    Ditto.

    And this really seems to be a generational thing.


    Seems endemic in the service community.


    I also hate the word "just" when followed by the word "two," which seems to be standard for hosts/hostesses in restaurants when my wife and I dine out.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Well, if we're going down that path, I don't like how "No problem" has taken the place of "You're welcome" in the common vernacular. For example, I ask a waiter to please do something like fill my water glass, I thank them, and they respond with "No problem." Well, it shouldn't be a problem because that's your job. A simple "You're welcome" will suffice. I'd actually prefer that they say nothing at all instead of "No problem." It REALLY bugs me.

    Now get off my lawn!
    BINGO! It's becoming an epidemic.

    And while we are on the subject, if a waitress brings me something and I say "thank you", please don't say, "No worries". We're not filming Crocodile Dundee IV, and you're not half as hip as you think you are.

    NOW! Get off MY lawn!

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Quote Originally Posted by jimsumner View Post
    Seems endemic in the service community.
    "Of course" has also become ubiquitous in that setting. I dislike it slightly less than "No problem," but dislike it I do.

  18. #58
    Since the conversation has gone this direction, I cannot stand the rhetorical, “right?” at the end of a comment. It happens everywhere (even in the OP—sorry rsvman). Especially in the media. It’s unnecessary, passive aggressive, and condescending.

    Ok sorry for the rant.

  19. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by BLPOG View Post
    That said, I think my favorite word might be one in Portuguese, saudade. I'm not sure how to precisely explain it without having a conversation, but the Wikipedia article does a decent job. It's a sort of melancholic, nostalgic longing for something that is irrevocably gone. The object of longing could be something physical, like a person, or something more abstract, like a perspective once held while naive to other matters.
    That's a wonderful word. Reminds me a bit of the Danish word "hyggeligt," which is similarly nuanced and virtually incapable of translation. It's a feeling of coziness and camaraderie with a touch of nostalgia. The best description I've heard for it is along the lines of: you've just been out sledding as a child and, as you walk in the front door at dusk to a welcoming, softly lit house, your mother hands you a nice cup of hot cocoa and invites you to sit by the fire where your father will read you your favorite book. It's that feeling.

    ...............

    I cannot stand the use of the word "hashtag." We're Americans, twitter is an American invention, ergo it's referred to as a pound or number sign. It should not be a hashtag except for Brits. I have also become exhausted by the word "super." "Very" or "quite" are just fine. Oh, and "epic" can go away, please.

    Others I don't like much (but might still use sometimes ):

    - totally
    - mouthfeel
    - synergy
    - literally
    - basically
    - arguably
    - iterative
    - predilection

    Words I love (that I can think of right now):

    - viscosity
    - desultory
    - mellifluous
    - ephemeral
    - discombobulate
    - literate
    - ubiquitous

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Wanted to add a spot on here for my dad.


    He realllllllyyyyy hates the word "just" and how often it is used. He lit-er-ally went on a 10 minute rant about it one day after he got back from his church.

    "I just wanted to thank you"
    "I was just wondering what you were doing"
    "Let's just go do this"

    He went on and on about how it was used in his pastors sermons and prayers.
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

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