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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA

    The Fitness Thread

    This thread is for the discussion of any and all fitness-related endeavors. Several of us are currently engaged in weight loss/self-improvement projects, and here, we can trade tips, offer encouragement, celebrate successes, etc.
    To recap my post from the LTE:

    I started my workout plan mid-Januaryish. I have the near-term goal of fitting respectably into my wedding tux and the long-term goal of being fit enough for a rigorous hike in Glacier National Park in June. I also want to lose weight and get more toned, which will happen automatically as I train for the hike.
    I'm doing 35-40 minutes of resistance training, followed by 20-25 minutes of cardio, 4-5 days a week. This is my first ever effort at establishing an extended, consistent resistance training program. It's paying dividends, but also leading to various aches and pains that I don't always know how to address. I'm down about 8 pounds so far, plateaued a bit in recent days.

    Here are my initial questions:
    • How to prevent and/or alleviate aches and pains that come especially for a novice weight trainer?
    • Ideas for alternative exercise on days when I'm looking for a change of pace...I don't generally mind the weights-treadmill sequence, but occasionally I am bored with that and/or too achy to spend much time on the treadmill. I have access to a robust array of group classes, etc. at my gym.

    Congrats to everyone who's working on their own fitness project. Let's support each other here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wilmington, NC

    Cool/Timely Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    This thread is for the discussion of any and all fitness-related endeavors. Several of us are currently engaged in weight loss/self-improvement projects, and here, we can trade tips, offer encouragement, celebrate successes, etc.
    To recap my post from the LTE:

    I started my workout plan mid-Januaryish. I have the near-term goal of fitting respectably into my wedding tux and the long-term goal of being fit enough for a rigorous hike in Glacier National Park in June. I also want to lose weight and get more toned, which will happen automatically as I train for the hike.
    I'm doing 35-40 minutes of resistance training, followed by 20-25 minutes of cardio, 4-5 days a week. This is my first ever effort at establishing an extended, consistent resistance training program. It's paying dividends, but also leading to various aches and pains that I don't always know how to address. I'm down about 8 pounds so far, plateaued a bit in recent days.

    Here are my initial questions:
    • How to prevent and/or alleviate aches and pains that come especially for a novice weight trainer?
    • Ideas for alternative exercise on days when I'm looking for a change of pace...I don't generally mind the weights-treadmill sequence, but occasionally I am bored with that and/or too achy to spend much time on the treadmill. I have access to a robust array of group classes, etc. at my gym.

    Congrats to everyone who's working on their own fitness project. Let's support each other here.
    I, too, have just started on this journey. Our cases seem very similar and our workout approach is similar except I'm only working out Mon, Wed, Fri. I decided to start out with that schedule because of a few reasons, one of which would be the sudden aches and pains on a 39 year body that isn't used to regular exercise anymore. Another is that I'm very new to this, so I don't want to overdo it and get burned out/give up.

    Did a lot of research before starting, and trying to go too hard for a noob is a big reason why a lot of people don't stick with it. I'm 6'1" and weigh 243 when I started. According to the Dr., I should weight around 185 for my build, but that seems a little extreme. I was thin as a bean pole in high school and weighed 185, and I was shorter then. So my goal weight is 200lbs. When I get there, I'll reassess if I think I should lose more, or do more weights to add muscle/tone.

    For aches and pains, most of my research says to drink plenty of water, it helps with the soreness. Ice baths are supposed to be the way to go if you're aching from head to toe. I haven't hurt that bad yet. But like I said, I'm taking rest days in between workouts at least for now.

    Alternative exercise: I bought a stationary bike and do spin class on Monday, run on Wed, and spin class on Friday. It gets boring too, but it does break up the monotony. Do you have a basketball, volleyball or racketball courts at your gym? You could sign up for a league, and just let that be your workout on game days. Much more fun than just working out. I want to do it, but don't have the free time right now(full time job, 3 kids in sports, I'm back in school myself). I've done good to sneak in the workouts I'm currently doing.

    Anyway, I've been at it seriously for 2.5 weeks now, and I'm down 10 lbs. But I'm sure the next 10-15 llbs will be harder to lose than the first 10 were. I think that was mostly due to diet change, which is half the battle.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    NC
    Epsom salt baths are supposed to be nice for aches and pains too. And massages don't hurt. But the body gets used to the exercise over time and the post-workout soreness gets less and less, provided you don't overdo it. And if you do overdo it, a brief rest/recovery is probably the best action. Exercise should ultimately be enjoyable for it to stick as a longer-term gameplan, and working through pain isn't a recipe for success in that regard.

    I'm also looking to drop a few lbs. I'm 5'11", and about 195 right now. Would like to get down to around 175-180, as I feel sluggish when playing sports these days. Some of that is post-ACL repair, some is just not exercising enough since the birth of my son. I'm probably going to focus more on cardio than strength training, but will probably mix in some weightlifting too. Just to keep things fresh, but also to help reshape/sculpt things. Essentially, if I could redistribute the weight around my belly to my pecs/back/arms, that'd be nice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by CDu View Post
    Epsom salt baths are supposed to be nice for aches and pains too. And massages don't hurt. But the body gets used to the exercise over time and the post-workout soreness gets less and less, provided you don't overdo it. And if you do overdo it, a brief rest/recovery is probably the best action. Exercise should ultimately be enjoyable for it to stick as a longer-term gameplan, and working through pain isn't a recipe for success in that regard.

    I'm also looking to drop a few lbs. I'm 5'11", and about 195 right now. Would like to get down to around 175-180, as I feel sluggish when playing sports these days. Some of that is post-ACL repair, some is just not exercising enough since the birth of my son. I'm probably going to focus more on cardio than strength training, but will probably mix in some weightlifting too. Just to keep things fresh, but also to help reshape/sculpt things. Essentially, if I could redistribute the weight around my belly to my pecs/back/arms, that'd be nice.
    From your lips to God's ears.

  5. #5
    Can you give us your age range? I lost 40 pounds in a month while a Duke student (at 21), but couldn't replicate that in my late 30's. At the time, I concentrated on drinking a lot of water (drank almost no other drinks but water), massive amounts of sleep (went to bed at like 8pm every night), strict calorie limits, and something like 45 minutes to an hour of cardio 6 days a week. I was pretty much still exhausted all the time that entire month.

    My current fitness plan is running between 2 and 2.5 miles every other day, with weight training on the off days. I currently have a broken arm (greater tuberosity fracture of my proximal humerus), so the weight training is on hold.

    Occasionally I will switch the run up by either running significantly faster than normal (normal pace is about 8 minute miles, faster pace is like 6:45 miles) or farther (3.5-4 miles). This takes a greater toll on my body, though, and I have to add an extra recovery day for my knees / legs.

    In the recent past (ie. last year), I would, at times, run two days in a row. I started having problems with bursitis in my knees, tendonitis in my ankles, etc. I find keeping the mileage down and not running two days in a row really helps alleviate this. My normal runs are trail runs with substantial hills.

    When the weather is nice, I will also break out the road bike. I enjoy that more, and it doesn't require recovery days. On the flip side you have to ride probably 4 times as long to get the same workout as a fast run (so requires a greater time commitment). And I hate riding in cold / rainy weather, where as I run in temperatures as low as 5 degrees, and don't mind running in light rain.

    The only other thing I'll add is that a lot of fitness / weight loss is diet. Sweets, alcohol, snacking; it's mostly common sense. My diet is still not where it needs to be, but the one thing that makes a huge difference is absolutely no eating anything after dinner (ie. no late night snacking). I still allow myself a glass of red wine or a beer while watching a movie or a Duke game late at night, but not ice cream or popcorn.

    I can't stand the treadmill (I don't mind running, but it has to be outdoors), but enjoy the rowing machine, cross trainers, and exercise bikes.

    ETA: Currently 6'1, 205. Got as high as 215 in college, but dropped to 175 in that month of exercise, and then to 165 in the next month. That was too thin. I think ideal weight for me is around 185. I stayed around that for much of my 20's and early 30's, but gradually gained 25 pounds with small kids, work travel, and lots of entertaining clients / eating out.

  6. #6
    Water absolutely helps with aches and pains, and Alleve is a wonder drug. Definitely take rest days from running at first. Eventually you won't need them anymore and can get by with a lighter/ slower run, but until your body gets acclimated you will need days off to recover.

    And yea, don't overdo it. (This is my bugaboo.) If it's too hard you won't stick with it. A reasonable regimen is enjoyable and will quickly become part of your routine.

    Also get a fitness tracker. I use an Apple Watch, have used a Fitbit in the past, and the little goals and badges and stuff make nice incentives to keep moving.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Quote Originally Posted by Reisen View Post
    Can you give us your age range? {snip}
    I'm 35. I've actually been pleasantly surprised at how quickly I've seen results this time around, and I'm truly hoping that this can be the beginning of more mindful lifelong commitment to physical wellness instead of my past on-again, off-again habits, because I know it will get harder for me to get (back) in shape very soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matches View Post
    {snip} Definitely take rest days from running at first. Eventually you won't need them anymore and can get by with a lighter/ slower run, but until your body gets acclimated you will need days off to recover.

    And yea, don't overdo it. (This is my bugaboo.) {snip}
    Just in the past week or so, I've noticed my next-day soreness dropping off somewhat. That moment when you start to feel like you're in a rhythm is really gratifying.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Excellent thread, thanks for starting it!

    For me, it all starts with proper hydration; getting sleep; and having a system that encourages a calorie deficit. Then put it into auto-pilot.

    Calorie deficit for me is achieved by weekly exercise goals (cardio and resistance); being mindful of calories eaten (roughly) in relation to average daily calorie burn (several calculators available online); and swapping good carbs for bad ones. No liquid calories besides milk and a veggie juice before going to the gym.

    Just turned 52. Have dropped 14.2 lbs. since Jan. 1. Would like to knock off a handful more, then maintain.

    It all sounds much more regimented than it is. Really, all I am trying to do is best my best score on the scale from yesterday or this day last week. Galaxa for the body.
    1991 -- 1992 -- 2001 -- 2010 -- 2015

  9. #9
    With two young kids (4 and 6 months) time is the biggest issue for me. I used to work out in the morning before work, but that is no longer possible unless I am going to wake up at 5 (spoiler - I am not going to wake up at 5). I now generally try to work out at lunch or in the evenings when the kids go to sleep. My current routine is to try and integrate resistance training and cardio together with the following routines:

    (1) A modified "Murph" (run 1 mile, then 20 minutes of 15 squats, 10 pushups, 5 pull-ups, every minute on the minute, then run 1 mile) (about 40 minutes total);

    (2) Go for a 30 minute workout with 10 burpees every two minutes (while jogging between sets);

    (3) Run 1 mile then 20 minutes of 20 squats, 10 pull-ups, 5 lunges on each leg, 15 pushups, every two minutes).

    I have no idea what these do from a physiological perspective, but they seem to crank the heart rate and they don't take too long. Any other suggestions of similar routines would be welcome!
    My Quick Smells Like French Toast.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Channing View Post
    (1) A modified "Murph" (run 1 mile, then 20 minutes of 15 squats, 10 pushups, 5 pull-ups, every minute on the minute, then run 1 mile) (about 40 minutes total);
    15 squats, 10 push-ups, AND 5 pull-ups every minute for 20 minutes? Sounds awful.

    Sadly, at the moment, doing 5 pull-ups (even just once) isn't an option for me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Deeetroit City
    I wish this had been a topic 30 years ago!

    I lost 60+ pounds between age 50 and 60. Goal is to lose 20 more.

    Bad news, pain is part of the process. Worse news, it doesn't get better as you get older.

    My chief recommendation for pain is flexibility training, eg yoga. Properly stretching the muscle allows for optimum blood flow through the muscle which allows for the muscle to optimally repair itself. Static stretching is OK, but the muscles don't really stretch until they have warmed up. For example, warm up on the treadmill for 5-10 minutes, then step off and stretch the legs and hips, THEN do your cardio workout.

    Foam rolling is a related remedy, worth trying for 5-10 minutes after a workout. If you have never tried foam rolling, you will not thank me for this suggestion. Remember, pain is just weakness leaving the body. Once your muscles become acclimated to foam rolling (particularly the IT band) it really cuts down on DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness).

    Rest days are critical for recovery, at least one per week, two if you are weight training three days a week. (I found yoga is perfect for rest days).

    For weight loss, nothing beats interval training, eg mixing sprints into a run, or weight training with supersets focusing on opposing muscle groups and limiting the break between sets to keep your heartrate up. HIIT (high intensity interval training) classes will leave you with a feeling that you really worked out.

    From a dietary standpoint, I'd recommend cleaning up your diet, primarily by eliminating processed or pre-packaged foods. It is amazing how much better for you food is if prepared from scratch. There are plenty of food services ie Blue Apron that will deliver all of the ingredients and recipes for some pretty good and easy to prepare meals.

    Last, I recommend DietBet or StepBet or their sister running app. You place a wager that you will lose 4% of your body weight in 1 month (or 10% in 6 months) or meet certain step goals or mileage goals and you split the "winnings" with everyone else who meets the goal. There is not much profit, less than $10 on a $30 bet, but it is amazing how much incentive having some "skin" in the game can add.

    God luck all! Community support is very helpful in achieving goals. Just telling others your goal makes it more likely that you will achieve it!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN.
    I'm in pretty good shape, but there's not a chance I could do 10 pull-ups every minute for 20 minutes. More power to ya!

    I've always been a runner and ran a decent half marathon in November. My training peaked at about 60 miles a week. I could eat whatever I want during training. Unfortunately, I think that was the last of my serious running. It's a big time commitment and I've already had two knee surgeries (ACL and meniscus). Just not worth it.

    Now, I try to exercise at least a little bit every day. I'm fortunate enough that my office has a pretty nice gym, so I generally go down during lunch. 3 days a week I do a circuit based class. An instructor comes up with the workout. 30-45 minutes long and hits all muscle groups with a little bit of cardio. It's a nice way to break up the monotony of working out. The other 4 days I run. Just depends on how far I feel like going. Right now, it's not very much because of the cold weather. When it warms up, I want to make sure I'm getting 20-25 miles a week in still.

    Diet wise, I typically eat lean meats and vegetables. Carbs in moderation. Beer on the weekends primarily. Maybe 1 or 2 during the week. Occasionally I'll have a coffee at the office. One soda every Sunday. Otherwise I strictly drink water. Bringing my lunch to work helps immensely. Keeps me from getting something unhealthy from the cafeteria.

    I think sticking with a healthy diet is more challenging than getting in some exercise. A bit of both goes the long way!

  13. #13
    Great thread. About one year ago I decided it was time to loose weight as age 40 was approaching fast. Lost 20lb with diet changes alone and now itís time to add strength. Iíve never lifted in my life. Played a lot of basketball at my time at duke, and still have a full court run once a week, but have avoided the gym like the plague. So I joined a small place with personal training two months ago. Itís expensive but Iíve transitioned from 1 on 1 training for two months to now semi private training which makes it more affordable. We focus on four main lifts - squat with the bar and weights, bench pressing, over head lift, and dead lifting. This trainer has taught me proper technique. I have not suffered any injury so far. Iím feeling and starting to look fitter than I ever have. For instance, Iíve never been able to do a single push up in my life. Now I can do five in a row that actually look good! Iím protein loading, trying to get 150 to 200 grams a day (which is tough).
    Overall, very excited about the future!

  14. #14
    You folks are inspiring. I am staring down forty in the next calendar year and need to make serious lifestyle changes to continue to do the things I enjoy. I will be watching this thread closely for tips and inspiration.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Reisen View Post
    The only other thing I'll add is that a lot of fitness / weight loss is diet. Sweets, alcohol, snacking; it's mostly common sense. My diet is still not where it needs to be, but the one thing that makes a huge difference is absolutely no eating anything after dinner (ie. no late night snacking). I still allow myself a glass of red wine or a beer while watching a movie or a Duke game late at night, but not ice cream or popcorn.
    This is one of those things that I've always known to be true, but I just recently really got it through my skull and made the changes. I'm 31, 5'5" and since February of last year I've gone from 177 (my heaviest and way more than I should ever weigh) to 140. From Feb to June I was running 5 or 6 days a week and had worked up to 3 miles most days and playing volleyball once or twice a week. At that point I think I was around 155. Then I broke my wrist and couldn't do much. In September I was diagnosed with a torn labrum in my hip so running was out and volleyball was cut back to once every other week. Had surgery on the hip in January and was on crutches for 4 weeks so I haven't truly exercised for about 7 months, yet I still managed to lose another 15 pounds because I was eating right most of the time.

    Diet wise I didn't completely eliminate anything. I know myself and if I said no bread then bread would be the only thing I wanted. However I did significantly cut back carbs, dairy, and sweets and did my best to increase vegetables. I'll still order a pizza every now and then when I don't feel like cooking or have some ice cream when I sit down to watch Grey's Anatomy but for the most part I'm eating chicken or ground turkey with veggies and maybe some brown rice. Last week it was a coworkers birthday and I had half a donut and a tiny tiny slice of ice cream cake and ended up with a headache. That was a real aha moment for how much I have actually changed my eating habits.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN.
    I remember having a conversation once with my father who is borderline obsessed with exercising. I asked him how he could always find time to get a workout in when I knew how busy he was. His response, "You don't find time, you make time." Thought that was a perfect response.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    I tried a Zumba class yesterday for a change of pace. It was a bust. The instructor was one of those annoyingly sassy types who seemed more interested in just shakiní it than in showing anyone how to do the maneuvers. I left after about 25 minutes and just had a regular weights and treadmill workout.

    Iím thinking today might be a rest day. Yesterdayís workout was 4 days in a row, and Iím having a few aches and pains that could use a day of recovery.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington DC
    Great thread!
    Here is something I used to do: we have a basic treadmill in the basement, and I used to DVR Duke games only on the TV down there. Iíd start the games a few mins late and watch while walking on the treadmill at a moderate speed (3-3.5 mph) on a steep incline. I can get through a game on dvr in around 90 mins, and 90 mins of walking on an incline burns a TON of calories and is easy on the body. Also I was so into the games that I would forget I was even walking and it helped with nervous energy. Sadly the multi-room DVR and other time commitments mean that I donít do this much anymore, but it helped me shed a few lbs at one point

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Very interesting thread.

    I retired two years ago and decided to join a gym for the first time in my life. I was slightly annoyed that I let them fast talk me into signing up for time with a trainer too - but at least based on my experience I have to say that was an outstanding decision.

    Without doing anything extreme I lost about twenty pounds. What especially impressed me is that's it's obvious that I added a fair amount of muscle weight - some of it in places I didn't even have places before. So it's pretty clear that more than twenty pounds of excess baggage got dropped and was replaced by muscle which naturally burns more calories at rest than the old flab did.

    I'm only going to the gym once or twice a week and I have to credit the trainer with the benefits I'm getting from the workouts - which are 25 minutes long. Initially I was working with the trainer four times a month, but I cut back to twice a month after the first year.

    What the trainer has contributed is his guidance to use whatever machine we're on and whatever muscle group we're focusing on in a very specific way. That typically means getting my grip just the way he wants it; maybe overhand, maybe underhand; or maybe a wider or narrower grip; or leaning me into or away from the machine slightly. More often than not his instruction makes the exercise a little more difficult, but it does in fact force the work to be done by the exact muscles he's trying to impact.

    So while the $40/session kind of bothered me at first, I have no doubt that I'm getting much greater benefits than I would have had I just joined the gym and then walked around "playing" with the machines.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Great thread, Wilson, thanks for starting it. I felt like a walking cliche when I made a New Years resolution to lose weight. I was at 171 and want to get to around 155. There's a great gym here at work that I hit a few times a week. I turned 50 last year and I've been working out since Jr. High school on and off and playing competitive sports, I think since birth. There's some good advice on this thread already but I'll add my thoughts as well.


    • I think the most important part of working out and dieting for results is to keep trying different things until you find what's right for you. Finding what you can do and stick with is important, otherwise you'll quit before you achieve your goals.
    • For example, someone mentioned above that they hate the treadmill but like to run outside. I'm the opposite, I'm OK (at best) running outside but I get bored quickly. On a treadmill I usually have Netflix going on my phone (see the what to watch thread). I also have a treadmill in my bedroom and can watch TV in there as well.
    • Speaking of treadmill, and running. I do get more sore now than I used to so I switch to an elliptical some days and that helps.
    • Not only is each person different, each time you go through this it can be different. Sometimes I ease into things, gain momentum and finish strong. Other times, I flip a switch and get after it crazy hard on day 1.
    • Last year I was easing into things, working out a few days a week. Made it through the holidays without gaining weight and was starting to work out more. I was turning 50 in June and was determined to hit 50 in great shape. Then on March 4th, I separated my shoulder playing soccer (fall on frozen ground). So...I came into 50 not in great shape. A year later, I've started the same path. I've lost about 5 lbs so far but progress has been slow. Last time I got in shape was 2015. I did Insanity and lost 26 lbs. I'm considering doing another round of Insanity.
    • Speaking of Insanity, sometimes I do well with systems that have a schedule. I've done Insanity a couple of times and P90X a couple of times. Every time I've done these programs and stuck with them, I've seen great results. Having a schedule that I'm supposed to meet pushes me to get it done and check off a box, etc. Sometimes I post on Facebook as well because making it public adds accountability because friends will ask me about it.
    • Getting older makes everything harder, slower and more painful. Oh well, I'm still going to get it done this year!
    • Diet is a big part of making progress. People are right about increasing your water intake. This is another thing where you have to find what's right for you. For example, prepping healthy meals at home is a great way to fix your diet...if you have time to do it. I don't. I generally start with a common sense approach: add water, reduce sugar, fat, calories. As my fitness level increases my diet gets more strict. By cutting down on sugar and desert, I start to crave them less (I love sweets and it takes a while for the cravings to die down for me). I do use what I call fake foods: protien bars and shakes (also Chocolate Milk is actually a really good post-workout drink).
    • For me, one of the hardest things about fixing my diet is that I get to where I'm eating the same thing over and over (how many different ways can I eat chicken?!).
    • One other thing that works for me: Using my Fitbit (accountability and tracking) and using an app on my phone called MyFitnessPal. My Fitness Pal tracks your diet and helps you see what you're really eating. Plus it syncs with Fitbit and takes your diet into account.
    • I'm what you'd call built for speed, not distance. Even at 50, I bet I can run a sub 5 second 40 (BTW, Google Darrell Green's sprint at 50). In June I'm going to try a 'Sprint Triathlon': 10 laps in a pool, 12 mile bike, 5k run. Not long distances but against my nature so we'll see how it goes. My sister in law completed this last year and is doing it again this year so I won't have to do it alone.
    • BD80's recommendation of taking Yoga and using a foam roller are both excellent. I use my foam roller about 5 days a week.


    That's enough rambling for now. I've been through this quite a few times. I'll get in shape, manage to maintain it for a while and then slowly start to gain weight until I hit a number that bothers me, snap and start another fitness cycle. Good luck to all. I'm looking forward to following this thread, always good to share and learn new ideas.

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