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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    Wonder how many years the lawsuits will last?

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/14/equi...-database.html

    Wonder how many weeks the CEO will last?
    I'm attending a nice reception tomorrow and the Vermont Attorney General will be there, I've got to chat him up. He's already noted that he thinks IdiotFax violated Vermont law by sitting on
    the info about the theft without informing our wee state as they should have. Many political points to be gained by going after jackals like these.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    I'm attending a nice reception tomorrow and the Vermont Attorney General will be there, I've got to chat him up. He's already noted that he thinks IdiotFax violated Vermont law by sitting on
    the info about the theft without informing our wee state as they should have. Many political points to be gained by going after jackals like these.
    Strongly agree! I suspect every state's AG will eventually go after Equifax. There's really no true AG downside to attacking. The credit bureaus high inaccuracy rates have been harming their constituents for many years. IMO, Equifax is not positioned for mercy.

    I suspect this will ultimately cost Equifax $250-500 million. Sounds rather substantial, but it's less than $4 per victim.

  3. #63
    Looks like the CEO is trying to survive:

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/15/equi...j-reports.html

    Good luck!

  4. #64
    At the risk of offending music majors everywhere, it is starting to surface that the CISO for Equifax may have been underqualified.

    (For the record, my best musical talent is listening, I have much respect for musically talented people.)

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Steamboat Springs, CO

    Some Actions -- More to Come

    Some Money Quotes from article on NBCNews.com:

    Equifax's feet are being held to the fire and that fire keeps getting higher.

    The beleaguered company announced Friday evening that its chief information officer and chief security officer had retired. A statement did not name the senior executives but said Mark Rohrwasser would serve as interim CIO and Russ Ayres would be interim CSO.
    Are these enough?

    "Not at all," Ed Mierzwinski, Senior Fellow for U.S. PIRG, a Washington-based advocacy group, told NBC News in an email. "These are calculated sacrifices at a company with a troubled record."

    "All the credit bureaus have a troubled culture because consumers do not regulate their markets," he added. "You cannot vote with your feet. They've only just begun to be reined in under the CFPB after 40 years of sneering at consumers and the FTC."
    Sage Grouse

    ---------------------------------------
    'When I got on the bus for my first road game at Duke, I saw that every player was carrying textbooks or laptops. I coached in the SEC for 25 years, and I had never seen that before, not even once.' - David Cutcliffe to Duke alumni in Washington, DC, June 2013

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    At the risk of offending music majors everywhere, it is starting to surface that the CISO for Equifax may have been underqualified.

    (For the record, my best musical talent is listening, I have much respect for musically talented people.)
    Quite frankly, for someone who is 59, there was absolutely no possibility of majoring in cyber security. A computer science degree for nearly anyone in a CIO position (usually meaning 15-20 years of experience or more) is sorely outdated with as quickly as the industry changes. It's all in what you keep learning after you get out of school. And with the tech boom in the 80s, a lot of subject matter experts began programming the new PCs, then becoming technology experts for their field.

    I say this as double major in design (art) and history. I've written three programming books, spoken at major conferences, and I'm well respected in my field. The art major made me extremely valuable with the advent of graphical user interfaces while the history major ensured that I could research lots of information and had better than average writing skills. Many, if not most of the speakers and authors that are my peers are computer science majors. And IIRC, I'm not the only art major/computer programmer on DBR. Most of the non-computer science majors in a tech field bring something else to the table that complements and elevates the entire team.

    I say this not to start a debate about majors (we've done that to death here). I say this to note that your degrees do not necessarily qualify you for your job. I've worked with incompetent people who have multiple advanced degrees in their field. I've also worked with people who have no degree at all and are exceptionally qualified.

    That's also not to say this CIO was totally qualified, either. But I'd like to see some other evidence than, "she's a music major." That argument just doesn't work in technology.

    [/rant] Sorry, fuse, I just had to get this off my chest. You must be fairly young and went to school after computer science majors became really popular, or you're working in a career that requires substantial degrees.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    ^i'll second that...my degree was in history (later an mba) but many of the people i worked with thought I was an electrical engineer based on what I did for work for 25 years.

  8. #68
    To both devil84 and budwom, I'll say I appreciate and support your perspectives.
    We're all learning and growing (hopefully), and I should not have propogated a convenient media narrative.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    To both devil84 and budwom, I'll say I appreciate and support your perspectives.
    We're all learning and growing (hopefully), and I should not have propogated a convenient media narrative.
    and of course it could also be true those guys ARE completely unqualified, so the original assertion could be correct. I bet we'll hear more...

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by budwom View Post
    and of course it could also be true those guys ARE completely unqualified, so the original assertion could be correct. I bet we'll hear more...
    Are you guys questioning the qualifications of the two terminated employees?

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    Are you guys questioning the qualifications of the two terminated employees?
    No.

    One poster cited a source that noted that the CIO was unqualified because she has a music degree. There are many people who are very successful in technology who possess non-technical majors (including me), and in the tech sector, particularly those who have 20+ years of experience in their field, the choice of major has no bearing on whether one is qualified.

    Those of us questioning that article are simply asking for evidence of a lack of qualifications other than "she's a music major."

  12. #72
    Plenty of degreed people are not skilled in their field.

  13. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    At the risk of offending music majors everywhere, it is starting to surface that the CISO for Equifax may have been underqualified.

    (For the record, my best musical talent is listening, I have much respect for musically talented people.)
    This statement should offend everyone, everywhere.

    First, at her age, majoring in computer science would have been rare, let alone any thought to network security.
    Second, she has nearly two decades of relevant cyber security experience.
    Third, the tech industry is notorious for taking majors of all walks of life because the more important skill is to solve problems that no one has seen before.

    Whether she was or was not qualified has ZERO to do with her major for 35 years ago.

    As a computer profressional with 20 years of experience, some of my best coworkers have been history majors, marine biology majors, english majors and of course, math and computer science majors. I've found very little evidence that being a computer major is college fills one with the knowledge needed to do the job after a few years under your belt. It might help as a new hire without experience, but eventually your ability to learn, adapt and solve problems is the most important skill.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Indoor66 View Post
    Plenty of degreed people are not skilled in their field.
    So many roads to the Peter Principle.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Forest Hills, NY
    For those of us who teach ethics and/or ERM, this (and the Wells Fargo saga) these are the gifts that just keep on giving. On behalf of my colleagues in the Academy, thank you!

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...urce=applenews

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by duke74 View Post
    For those of us who teach ethics and/or ERM, this (and the Wells Fargo saga) these are the gifts that just keep on giving. On behalf of my colleagues in the Academy, thank you!
    IMO, society deserves much of the blame. Look at a partial list of what Wells Fargo has done just since 2008:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wells_Fargo#Controversies

    What has society done to end this terrible behavior? Has society refused to re-elect DAs who have not investigated and prosecuted these criminals?

    Maybe, I'm asking too much from society. Let's make it relatively simple and easy. Has society closed most of their legitimate accounts at Wells Fargo or do 1 in 3 American households still bank at Wells?

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    IMO, society deserves much of the blame. Look at a partial list of what Wells Fargo has done just since 2008:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wells_Fargo#Controversies

    What has society done to end this terrible behavior? Has society refused to re-elect DAs who have not investigated and prosecuted these criminals?

    Maybe, I'm asking too much from society. Let's make it relatively simple and easy. Has society closed most of their legitimate accounts at Wells Fargo or do 1 in 3 American households still bank at Wells?
    I suspect that most people have no idea what Wells Fargo has done. They vaguely remember seeing a headline about something but since it didn't seem to affect them directly (as far as they could tell), they moved on. Since it wasn't ratings popping news, the coverage wasn't what you'd see for say a Grayson Allen on the court skirmish.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by elvis14 View Post
    I suspect that most people have no idea what Wells Fargo has done. They vaguely remember seeing a headline about something but since it didn't seem to affect them directly (as far as they could tell), they moved on. Since it wasn't ratings popping news, the coverage wasn't what you'd see for say a Grayson Allen on the court skirmish.
    Exactly! Society would rather be highly critical of a young man still finding himself, than a bunch of elite criminals stealing millions and possibly billions. It's easy to see a kid trip someone, but it takes a little bit of effort to understand true crimes.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 09-19-2017 at 05:05 PM. Reason: multi-tasking

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mary's Place
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    IMO, society deserves much of the blame. Look at a partial list of what Wells Fargo has done just since 2008:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wells_Fargo#Controversies

    What has society done to end this terrible behavior? Has society refused to re-elect DAs who have not investigated and prosecuted these criminals?

    Maybe, I'm asking too much from society. Let's make it relatively simple and easy. Has society closed most of their legitimate accounts at Wells Fargo or do 1 in 3 American households still bank at Wells?
    It's not just Wells. Any corporation that gets caught doing something illegal just agrees to a fine, admits no wrongdoing, and the people who ordered it, did it, and signed off on it go somewhere else and get paid. No matter how big the fines are, they can be written off as the cost of doing business. And it's a tough sell for DAs to go up against a battalion of corporate lawyers who can drag the matter out indefinitely and then complain about taxpayer expense.

    It would be nice if we can get back to naming and shaming, perp walks, felony convictions, and incarceration in Rikers. "Give them a fair trial and then put them in front of the firing squad!"

    Getting back to Equifax, I went ahead and ordered up the credit reports, and will probably go ahead and pay for credit freezes across the board.
    "Quality is not an option!"

  20. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by Turk View Post
    It's not just Wells. Any corporation that gets caught doing something illegal just agrees to a fine, admits no wrongdoing, and the people who ordered it, did it, and signed off on it go somewhere else and get paid. No matter how big the fines are, they can be written off as the cost of doing business. And it's a tough sell for DAs to go up against a battalion of corporate lawyers who can drag the matter out indefinitely and then complain about taxpayer expense.

    It would be nice if we can get back to naming and shaming, perp walks, felony convictions, and incarceration in Rikers. "Give them a fair trial and then put them in front of the firing squad!"

    Getting back to Equifax, I went ahead and ordered up the credit reports, and will probably go ahead and pay for credit freezes across the board.
    No doubt, it's not just Wells Fargo.

    However, in the case of Wells Fargo, society could make certain Wells Fargo never harms another society member by merely closing all their Wells Fargo accounts. IMO, society is part of the problem!

    Equifax is a more difficult issue to resolve.

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