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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    23AC6C2F-C85E-45AD-9E3F-73D3B2B846C2.jpg

    not smoked, but . . . Mrs. OPK outdid herself today.

    Now, some really good wine and a basketball game coming up. I’m in charge of the turkey stock soup, which is simmering low and slow.

    Love Thanksgiving!


    And CBAndB, that looks wonderful. You are an artist on the canvas, and on the smoker too!

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Summerville ,S.C.
    We are doing family thanks giving sunday.i will attempt to smoke a turkey.We doing one in oven for back up.used my torch and made a honey baked ham today.wasnt exact but was close.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Correct side of the Durham/CH border
    Ok I’m gonna brag a little. Smoked our turkey on the BGE after 18 hours of brining. Have done three years in a row and this was by far the best. The brining is the key.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    “Coach said no 3s.” - Zion on The Block

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Summerville ,S.C.
    Flubbed my turkey .temp timer died.totally died.that about sums it up.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Bern, NC unless it's a home football game then I'm grilling on Devil's Alley
    Quote Originally Posted by wavedukefan70s View Post
    Flubbed my turkey .temp timer died.totally died.that about sums it up.
    RIP
    Q "Why do you like Duke, you didn't even go there." A "Because my art school didn't have a basketball team."

  6. #86
    Took my first shot at beef brisket over the weekend.

    Kept the gas grill under 250, generally ranging around 240.

    Ballpark 8 pound brisket, dry rub, no mopping and no pre cook marinade.

    Not much fat to it and following the temps on the igrill, it took almost 22 hours to get to 185. Stalled for a few hours at 145 and 170.

    Not surprisingly was super, super dry.

    A good, if expensive, learning experience.
    Had high hopes it would have turned out much better.

    Barbeque sauce to the rescue.

    Likely stick to pork for a while before trying again.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    Took my first shot at beef brisket over the weekend.

    Kept the gas grill under 250, generally ranging around 240.

    Ballpark 8 pound brisket, dry rub, no mopping and no pre cook marinade.

    Not much fat to it and following the temps on the igrill, it took almost 22 hours to get to 185. Stalled for a few hours at 145 and 170.

    Not surprisingly was super, super dry.

    A good, if expensive, learning experience.
    Had high hopes it would have turned out much better.

    Barbeque sauce to the rescue.

    Likely stick to pork for a while before trying again.
    A few thoughts, FWIW:

    1. Was it just a flat, or a packer cut (flat and point)? I have always done a packer cut, trimmed it up but left about 1/4 to 1/8 inch fat on the flat to help protect the meat. I think that most flats you get in the store are trimmed too closely so there is not enough fat.

    2. May be counterintuitive, but I think you want an internal temp of about 200-205 before pulling. It is tough if you pull at 185. (This surprised me, used to butts where 185 is slicing and 195 is pulled. But it works)

    3. Wrap at the stall in foil (“Texas Crutch”) if you want to speed up timing, or Pink butcher paper a-la Allen’s. Best advice I have gotten on when to foil: worry more about wrapping when the brisket is the color you want, as opposed to a magic time or temp. If wrapping in foil, put in a little water, apple juice, or apple vinegar with water for moisture.

    Butts take me about 75 minutes a pound at 250; brisket slightly less than an hour a pound.

    Brisket is somewhat less forgiving to cook than a butt, but when it works it is absurdly good.

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Probably more than you want, but I went to a brisket class last spring. One presenter was an accomplished back-yard guy, the other a competition cooker. Here are my notes, which I check as I cook (did five packer cuts last year, all came out well) and add to after a smoke if I learn something:

    Selection of packer's cut:
    * State the obvious : get highest quality possible. Prime, choice, select are descending grades. Note CAB not a grade but supposedly is top 1% of choice or else prime, and selected by ten criteria (marbling, size, uniformity, etc.). https://www.certifiedangusbeef.com/brand/specs.php
    * compact cut > longer one

    Trimming:
    * Excellent Fireside video on trimming: https://youtu.be/g_P7tiFtwkk
    * Small slices, take your time
    * Burnt ends -- take more fat out between flat and point. Want rub and bark on as much of point as possible. Video says to trim all fat off top of point too; I guess we treat it like a Boston Butt. ("Top" being the long fat cap side).
    * Between point and flat: Much more separation on trim between flat and point than I have been doing. Like a big tongue. Will want fat layer on flat to be about same thickness as you trim the exposed flat.
    * Lose about 3.5 lbs on a 12 lb brisket from trimming
    * Trim off grey cryo freeze

    Rub and set up:
    * One presenter cooks fat up, one down. Depends on whether smoker has higher top or bottom heat.
    * Rubs with lots of sugar -- gonna turn black
    * Binder not needed if only 1 or 2 rubs. Used spray-on canola oil as binder. Water-based binder is best because rubs are fat-soluble, not water soluble.
    * Chips -- only good for short bursts. Soaking just makes steam. Use chunks.
    * Wood: whatever you like. Pecan is versatile. 2 chunks light, 8 heavy. Experiment.

    The cook:
    * Pit temp-- no right answer. Two types of competition cooks: low and slow, and hot and fast. Both work. Base it on when you want to be done.
    * 225 minimum; 250-275 "normal;" higher if need quicker.
    * Key is to try and keep temp consistent.
    * When temp at 160-170, next action item. Really depends on color. When it looks good, wrap it.
    * Why wrap? Don't want hard crusty bark -- that's just meat loss. Wrap protects.
    * Usually add some liquid on the foil wrap to steam. This will also help through stall.
    * Once through stall, goes quick.
    * Water or watered-down beef broth (watch for salt -- use low sodium!!!) are good liquids to add in wrap. Avoid sugar because blackens. Apple cider vinegar mentioned. Pour around outside of meat, not on top.
    * Both presenters use heavy duty foil (double-wrap). Using butcher paper for first time tonight. No liquid added to butcher paper.

    Out of the smoker:
    * Target internal temp: at least 195, at most 207. Competition guy likes 202-205.
    * Carry-over cooking: more of an issue when cooking at 350 than at 225. Depends in part on your cooking temp. If hot n' fast cook you may need to pull on lower end because of carry-over cooking.
    * Put in pans after pulling to help catch au jus.
    * Rest method: depends on when you want to eat.
    * When ready to carve, pull off point from flat.
    * Carve against grain. Pencil thickness. If it crumbles, make slices a bit thicker. When flat gets wide, divide in two (cut on grain) then carve the two halves against the grain.
    * Burnt ends: bisect point then cube. Sauce, no rub because grainy. Cook another hour.
    * Au jus on top -- taken from foil. Put foiled brisket in pan to catch au jus.

    Tool thought:
    * Good filet knife and carving knife Important.

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    A few thoughts, FWIW:

    1. Was it just a flat, or a packer cut (flat and point)? I have always done a packer cut, trimmed it up but left about 1/4 to 1/8 inch fat on the flat to help protect the meat. I think that most flats you get in the store are trimmed too closely so there is not enough fat.

    2. May be counterintuitive, but I think you want an internal temp of about 200-205 before pulling. It is tough if you pull at 185. (This surprised me, used to butts where 185 is slicing and 195 is pulled. But it works)

    3. Wrap at the stall in foil (“Texas Crutch”) if you want to speed up timing, or Pink butcher paper a-la Allen’s. Best advice I have gotten on when to foil: worry more about wrapping when the brisket is the color you want, as opposed to a magic time or temp. If wrapping in foil, put in a little water, apple juice, or apple vinegar with water for moisture.

    Butts take me about 75 minutes a pound at 250; brisket slightly less than an hour a pound.

    Brisket is somewhat less forgiving to cook than a butt, but when it works it is absurdly good.
    1- not sure, from Publix. Not much fat on the bottom, would have guessed less than a quarter inch.

    2- I got a bit anxious expecting an 8+ lb brisket thinking it might take 8-12 hours. At 22 hours when it hit 185 I figured it was done enough.

    3- I wasn’t worried about the stall, was hoping the end result would have been tender and moist instead of desert dry.

    Thanks for the insight and advice!

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    1- not sure, from Publix. Not much fat on the bottom, would have guessed less than a quarter inch.

    2- I got a bit anxious expecting an 8+ lb brisket thinking it might take 8-12 hours. At 22 hours when it hit 185 I figured it was done enough.

    3- I wasn’t worried about the stall, was hoping the end result would have been tender and moist instead of desert dry.

    Thanks for the insight and advice!
    I added some notes since that first post that might help. Sounds like a normal flat which is good for grilling or corned beef but not ideal for a long smoke.

    3 hours per pound does not sound right. Do you have a thermometer at grill level, or dome thermometer? Something very odd there.

  11. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by OldPhiKap View Post
    I added some notes since that first post that might help. Sounds like a normal flat which is good for grilling or corned beef but not ideal for a long smoke.

    3 hours per pound does not sound right. Do you have a thermometer at grill level, or dome thermometer? Something very odd there.
    I used a Weber igrill with two probes, an ambient grill temperature probe, and other that was in the meat.

    Thanks for sharing the other details. That class sounds like it could be fun.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    I used a Weber igrill with two probes, an ambient grill temperature probe, and other that was in the meat.

    Thanks for sharing the other details. That class sounds like it could be fun.
    And tasty! Each presented had a brisket ready to carve at the end.

  13. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    Took my first shot at beef brisket over the weekend.

    Kept the gas grill under 250, generally ranging around 240.

    Ballpark 8 pound brisket, dry rub, no mopping and no pre cook marinade.

    Not much fat to it and following the temps on the igrill, it took almost 22 hours to get to 185. Stalled for a few hours at 145 and 170.

    Not surprisingly was super, super dry.

    A good, if expensive, learning experience.
    Had high hopes it would have turned out much better.

    Barbeque sauce to the rescue.

    Likely stick to pork for a while before trying again.
    Grill or smoker? On a properly controlled smoker at 240 degrees, an 8 pound piece of beef or pork should hit 190-200 in 8-12 hours.
    Something seems off with your equipment and/or thermometers.

  14. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by BigWayne View Post
    Grill or smoker? On a properly controlled smoker at 240 degrees, an 8 pound piece of beef or pork should hit 190-200 in 8-12 hours.
    Something seems off with your equipment and/or thermometers.
    A Broilmaster aluminum grill with a “smoker shutter” for the heat to be more indirect.

    It was pretty cold out, maybe the igrill and probes don’t work so well at 20 degrees.

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    Took my first shot at beef brisket over the weekend.

    Kept the gas grill under 250, generally ranging around 240.

    Ballpark 8 pound brisket, dry rub, no mopping and no pre cook marinade.

    Not much fat to it and following the temps on the igrill, it took almost 22 hours to get to 185. Stalled for a few hours at 145 and 170

    Likely stick to pork for a while before trying again.
    I did a 15 lb brisket Xmas eve that took about 11.5 hours at 275 just for comparison (that was the pre-trimming weight).

    It does seem counterintuitive that undercooking brisket would make it dry, but it’s true. Everything I read says 203 is the magic temp but at the same time it’s such a big piece of meat that you really have to go by feel.

    My experence is that a higher temp like 275 works better. And I prefer wrapping in butcher paper because I feel like foil can sometimes make it too crumbly for my taste.

    I know exactly how disheartening it is to pull off a ‘misket’ but I would urge you to keep trying. Like learning to ride a bike, you never get the feel if you only do it a couple times a year. My worst one was a $90 waygu so that kind of added insult to injury. Good luck!

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Quote Originally Posted by fuse View Post
    A Broilmaster aluminum grill with a “smoker shutter” for the heat to be more indirect.

    It was pretty cold out, maybe the igrill and probes don’t work so well at 20 degrees.
    I use my Weber grill and definitely go with 100% indirect heat, i.e. meat towards the back of the three burner grill, only the front burner on, steady temp of 225. Agree with OPK that cooking time should be WAY less*...can also use some moistening agent above the burner that's on, liquid to keep the moisture...lots of rub on the meat also protects the meat from drying out...

    *also depends upon the shape of the meat, obviously, less thick and longer requires less cooking time...

    I applaud all efforts at cold weather grilling and smoking, did a quick swordfish grill at -4 a few weeks ago, the record thus far for winter 2018

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by GDT View Post
    I did a 15 lb brisket Xmas eve that took about 11.5 hours at 275 just for comparison (that was the pre-trimming weight).

    It does seem counterintuitive that undercooking brisket would make it dry, but it’s true. Everything I read says 203 is the magic temp but at the same time it’s such a big piece of meat that you really have to go by feel.

    My experence is that a higher temp like 275 works better. And I prefer wrapping in butcher paper because I feel like foil can sometimes make it too crumbly for my taste.

    I know exactly how disheartening it is to pull off a ‘misket’ but I would urge you to keep trying. Like learning to ride a bike, you never get the feel if you only do it a couple times a year. My worst one was a $90 waygu so that kind of added insult to injury. Good luck!
    Only $90? Must have been < 1 pound. LOL

    We got ads from Costco for Christmas advertising a 12 pound waygu on sale for about $1000 (no typo) with regular price being $1200 (again, no typo) . Our younger daughter and her husband visiting from Chicago after Christmas were expecting us to order two of them .
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Only $90? Must have been < 1 pound. LOL

    We got ads from Costco for Christmas advertising a 12 pound waygu on sale for about $1000 (no typo) with regular price being $1200 (again, no typo) . Our younger daughter and her husband visiting from Chicago after Christmas were expecting us to order two of them .
    Try Huntspoint.com or snakeriverfarms.com for pricing and shipping Wagyu

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Correct side of the Durham/CH border
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Only $90? Must have been < 1 pound. LOL

    We got ads from Costco for Christmas advertising a 12 pound waygu on sale for about $1000 (no typo) with regular price being $1200 (again, no typo) . Our younger daughter and her husband visiting from Chicago after Christmas were expecting us to order two of them .
    I think I know why it was only $90... it wasn’t real Wagyu. It was Waygu, the cubic zirconia of brisket.
    “Coach said no 3s.” - Zion on The Block

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Rosenrosen View Post
    I think I know why it was only $90... it wasn’t real Wagyu. It was Waygu, the cubic zirconia of brisket.
    Sort of like fake classes in the university world.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

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