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  1. #161
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by PackMan97 View Post
    I have an antique muzzle loader that's been in my family for quite some time. Does anyone know of a Triangle area dealer that might be able to tell me more about and/or appraise/restore it. It's not in bad shape, but it's had virtually nothing done to it for 30 years. I remember my dad firing it once many many moons ago (maybe 35-40 years).

    It makes a great home defense weapon...how needs a baseball bat when you have a six foot long 1/4" thick metal barrel!
    Not in the triangle area so can't help but would love to see a pic!
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

  2. #162
    Def post a photo...I can get it IDed for you.

  3. #163




    Here you go...and it's really more like 4 to 4 1/2 feet long. It always seemed bigger as a kid

  4. #164
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by PackMan97 View Post




    Here you go...and it's really more like 4 to 4 1/2 feet long. It always seemed bigger as a kid
    quick google, you've probably already seen -

    Joseph Golcher was a lockmaker who was located in Philadelphia PA circa the mid 19th century. His locks were sold to gunsmiths all over the country, particularly in the East. He made percussion and flint gun locks circa 1825 – 1860. His brother was James Golcher (II) (1810- ). Proprietor, Eagle Gun Works (q.v.). gun and pistol makers, but primarily gun lock makers. [Dirs., 1841, 1846, 1855; O’Brien’s Wholesale Dir., 1849]. The U.S. Census of 1850 showed James Golcher, age 40; Ann, 38, his wife; William, 16; Mary, 12; Ann, 10, all born in England; Thomas, 8; James, 6; Sarah, 2, all born in the United States. This suggests that whatever gunlocks he may have made before 1833 were made in England and production in the U.S. began about that time.

    Although it seems that some guns were produced as "replicas" of earlier guns by Great Western Gunworks in Pittsburgh later, 1865 to early 20th century. They were given the same Joseph Golcher stamps.

    Are there any other markings on the barrel? Opposite side?
    "That young man has an extra step on his ladder the rest of us just don't have."

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