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  1. #381
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    I've been traveling from Colorado to South Florida a bit this winter to look after aging parents. I got interested in the history of South Florida and the Everglades.

    I read "The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise" by Michael Grunwald. Very interesting book. I never realized the Seminole were not native to South Florida. The efforts to drain the Everglades allowed the settlement of South Florida by white folks but has had disastrous environmental consequences.

    A good read.
    Last edited by MartyClark; 02-25-2019 at 11:43 AM. Reason: spelling

  2. #382
    Quote Originally Posted by luburch View Post
    So I just finished the Red Rising Trilogy by Piece Brown. If you enjoyed the Hunger Game series or Ender's Game then I highly recommend it.

    I was curious what everyone else is reading or had finished reading recently and if anyone had any recommendations?

    I will read pretty much anything I can get my hands on. Fiction, non-fiction, sci-fi, doesn't make a difference. Debating starting the Game of Thrones series..

    Recently, I've read the three JK Rowling detective novels, Life is Not an Accident (J-Will), and The Hobbit.

    Anyone have anything they're reading now or that they recommend? I figured this thread could be a nice soundboard for those looking for something new to read.
    Can't go wrong with Dark Tower. If you want another YA (too young, but enjoyable) check out the Necrosanguin series. If you want some bigger stories with awesome worlds and magic systems, check out anything in Brandon Sanderson's Cosmere Universe.



  3. #383
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mary's Place
    As anyone who has poked their nose into any of the various "Announcer" threads that pop up from time to time might recall, I am probably one of the biggest Bill Walton fans on DBR, so as such, this recommendation should probably be taken with a dietitian-shuddering dose of salt.

    I finished Walton's memoir, "Back From The Dead", and I thought it was one of the best basketball books I've ever read, in the same class as Bill Russell's "Second Wind". There is a lot for Walton haters to dislike: chapter names from song lyrics, the tendency to use a half-dozen SAT adjectives in a description when two or maybe three good ones are sufficient, and too many bits of the usual Deadhead / Neil / Dylan mystical musical blather.

    What makes this book a winner for me is the perspective that Walton has gained since his recovery from debilitating back pain and the resulting suicidal depression. Of course, there are plenty of basketball stories, and overcoming-all-odds episodes about regaining mobility, becoming a broadcaster despite his stuttering, etc. The depth of his lasting decades-long relationship with Coach Wooden makes me jealous; I have no such relationship with any of the teachers or coaches that have passed through my life. I wonder at the man's ability to stay positive, enthusiastic, and motivated despite all the physical damage he's accumulated.

    It would be an interesting exercise if one of the DBR Walton skeptics / haters checked the book out of the library, had a go at it, and shared their thoughts. There's a pretty decent cross-section here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-from-the-dead

    As for me, I am thinking I might make it a permanent addition to the Turk library, perhaps even splurging for a signed copy on ebay...
    "Quality is not an option!"

  4. #384
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    The Beach
    Quote Originally Posted by Turk View Post
    As anyone who has poked their nose into any of the various "Announcer" threads that pop up from time to time might recall, I am probably one of the biggest Bill Walton fans on DBR, so as such, this recommendation should probably be taken with a dietitian-shuddering dose of salt.

    I finished Walton's memoir, "Back From The Dead", and I thought it was one of the best basketball books I've ever read, in the same class as Bill Russell's "Second Wind". There is a lot for Walton haters to dislike: chapter names from song lyrics, the tendency to use a half-dozen SAT adjectives in a description when two or maybe three good ones are sufficient, and too many bits of the usual Deadhead / Neil / Dylan mystical musical blather.

    What makes this book a winner for me is the perspective that Walton has gained since his recovery from debilitating back pain and the resulting suicidal depression. Of course, there are plenty of basketball stories, and overcoming-all-odds episodes about regaining mobility, becoming a broadcaster despite his stuttering, etc. The depth of his lasting decades-long relationship with Coach Wooden makes me jealous; I have no such relationship with any of the teachers or coaches that have passed through my life. I wonder at the man's ability to stay positive, enthusiastic, and motivated despite all the physical damage he's accumulated.

    It would be an interesting exercise if one of the DBR Walton skeptics / haters checked the book out of the library, had a go at it, and shared their thoughts. There's a pretty decent cross-section here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-from-the-dead

    As for me, I am thinking I might make it a permanent addition to the Turk library, perhaps even splurging for a signed copy on ebay...
    I love Walton. I don't watch Pac 12 games for the basketball, I watch them for Walton (and Dave Pasch, their dynamic intrigues me). Based upon this I will probably read the book. BUT... If an audio version does exist with narration from Walton, I'll do that instead.

  5. #385
    Reading "Peyton Place" by Grace Metalious. Call it a New England thing.

  6. #386
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC area
    My kiddo (HS soph) suggested I read IT. I've read a bit of Stephen King, but not this one. We'll see how it goes!

    (Haven't seen the movie, either)

    -jk

  7. #387
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northwest NC
    Just finished Bad Blood, the story about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Crazy story about her rise and fall and the lengths she and others went to to deceive investors, the FDA and the general public about their invention. It's unbelievable that they put people's lives at stake knowing their product was a piece of crap the entire time.

  8. #388
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mary's Place
    Finished Springsteen's "Born To Run" autobiography. Could have safely been at least 100-150 pages shorter. Never underestimate the value of a good editor. A friend of mine who is a hard-core Bruce fan couldn't get past the first 100 pages. Another friend who made it through said "Just watch the Broadway special on Netflix - the best of the stories, plus a few songs, in less time."
    "Quality is not an option!"

  9. #389
    Quote Originally Posted by DUKIECB View Post
    Just finished Bad Blood, the story about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Crazy story about her rise and fall and the lengths she and others went to to deceive investors, the FDA and the general public about their invention. It's unbelievable that they put people's lives at stake knowing their product was a piece of crap the entire time.
    I watched the HBO documentary recently. I’m pretty sure she’s incapable of seeing that she did anything wrong —- like hardwired that way. Have you seen the documentary? If so, do you think the book is worth a read? Or covering the same ground? Thanks in advance!

  10. #390
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northwest NC
    Sorry, I have not seen the documentary but I would have to think it covers the same ground. The book was actually a little slow in the early stages as it went about setting up the backstory but the last 1/3 was great. I was constantly shaking my head in wonderment at how she thought she was going to get away with the decisions she was making. Astonishing really.
    "The future ain't what it used to be."

  11. #391
    Quote Originally Posted by Turk View Post
    Finished Springsteen's "Born To Run" autobiography. Could have safely been at least 100-150 pages shorter. Never underestimate the value of a good editor. A friend of mine who is a hard-core Bruce fan couldn't get past the first 100 pages. Another friend who made it through said "Just watch the Broadway special on Netflix - the best of the stories, plus a few songs, in less time."
    Best experience was reading the book and then seeing him live at the Kerr Theatre. More than a few songs, and the stories were great.

  12. #392
    I'm heading to the library this weekend to pick up my May reading material. If anyone has any recommendations in the areas below (current interests), I'd be interested! In no particular order...

    1. History and current issues of Social Security Administration, options for addressing insolvency, potential insolvency impact on workers.

    2. Histories of work and labor. Current analysis of the state of work and job markets and how individuals think of and relate to work. There's a book called "Cubed: The Secret History of White Collar Work" that I'd like to check out, for example.

    3. History and legacy of Great Society programs.

    4. Business success or failure stories (individual or enterprise). Like 'Bad Blood', the Theranos story, mentioned up-thread. Examinations of critical moments in business/trade/financial history ---- like 'Too Big to Fail', for example.

    5. Travelogue (w/ culture and history education thrown in). I just got done reading Blue Latitudes. The author attempts to recreate James Cooks' famous Pacific voyages while examining his legacy, contemporary understanding, etc. He also provides a parallel history of Cook's voyages based on primary sources.

    NOTE: I know we have some highly educated posters who are expert in certain areas. For the above, I can certainly handle reasonably dense books but looking for books accessible to an informed but not expert reader.

  13. #393
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Walnut Creek, California
    About four months ago, I was invited, as an old man, to join an old man's book club. The club has been in existence for about five years, but has suffered some loss. They needed younger blood. I am not a good bet with respect to that issue. Nonetheless, they have enticed me to read three books, each of which has been an enjoyable read.

    The first is a book by Fredrik Backman, entitled Beartown. It is an allegory placed in a small Swedish town, purportedly describing the modern human condition–-hope, success, a destructive/dishonorable crime, and blame. The author's character development is very true to life. I enjoyed this work very much. It does not end the way you might predict.

    The second, is Jane Mayer's Dark Money. It is a nonfiction exposé about how the Koch Brothers' empire was formed, how it morphed into an amoral business enterprise and then into a secretive, powerful, yet intellectually dishonest, political force. It is well researched and entirely readable. It only goes up to 2016, but it it is a powerful voice proving rather clearly that there is a vast right wing conspiracy which is hard to put a finger on.

    The third book is Hemingway's 1926 first novel, The Sun Also Rises. This is a relatively easy read, but a complex novel to discuss. Several of the group had read it long ago and were pleasantly surprised by themes and characters they had not really understood as youths. There is a lot to see in his characters that is initially unclear. The book has been analyzed by thousands of professional critics and many of them say things that we did not see, or things that we rejected. In any event, readers in their 60s or 70s have a worldview that younger people do not. Still, Hemingway wrote this in 1925 when he was only 26 and the layers of his reality as a writer are impressive. It's a good club book.

  14. #394
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    I've just started the Wheel of Time series. I like reading big, ponderous series like this, as they keep me engaged for an extended period of time, especially with summer vacation (mercifully) looming.
    I'm only like 5 chapters into book 1, but definitely already into it and expect to enjoy it. Has anyone else read it?

  15. #395
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    I've just started the Wheel of Time series. I like reading big, ponderous series like this, as they keep me engaged for an extended period of time, especially with summer vacation (mercifully) looming.
    I'm only like 5 chapters into book 1, but definitely already into it and expect to enjoy it. Has anyone else read it?
    Yes. The series is great, and upon re-reading I found that the biggest complaint I had the first time around diminished (which is surprising given the nature of the complaint). Without going into too much detail (since that might make the issue more noticeable), a lot of readers feel that in the middle to late middle of the series, things really drag and a few characters have attitudes that make their stories somewhat tedious. If that starts to happen, my strong recommendation is just to push through.

    You'll get some extra enjoyment if you recognize what Jordan draws from history, religion, etc. The last few books, written by Brandon Sanderson, finish the series well and mostly match Jordan's style, IMO.

    Also, Jordan wrote with the interesting style of planning out basically everything, but not explaining everything to the reader. So there are mysteries which have definite answers, some of which can be deduced by the reader, some of which are eventually explained in the text, and some of which are deliberately unanswered.

  16. #396
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Quote Originally Posted by BLPOG View Post
    Yes. The series is great, and upon re-reading I found that the biggest complaint I had the first time around diminished (which is surprising given the nature of the complaint). Without going into too much detail (since that might make the issue more noticeable), a lot of readers feel that in the middle to late middle of the series, things really drag and a few characters have attitudes that make their stories somewhat tedious. If that starts to happen, my strong recommendation is just to push through.

    You'll get some extra enjoyment if you recognize what Jordan draws from history, religion, etc. The last few books, written by Brandon Sanderson, finish the series well and mostly match Jordan's style, IMO.

    Also, Jordan wrote with the interesting style of planning out basically everything, but not explaining everything to the reader. So there are mysteries which have definite answers, some of which can be deduced by the reader, some of which are eventually explained in the text, and some of which are deliberately unanswered.
    This is encouraging, given that my Duke majors were history and religion. Thanks for the advice.

  17. #397
    I'm reading the Wikipedia page for the Danish String Quartet, after seeing this (and after seeing some h.s./college kids actually do this justice): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhnZK-NxcQk

  18. #398
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Quote Originally Posted by wilson View Post
    I've just started the Wheel of Time series. I like reading big, ponderous series like this, as they keep me engaged for an extended period of time, especially with summer vacation (mercifully) looming.
    I'm only like 5 chapters into book 1, but definitely already into it and expect to enjoy it. Has anyone else read it?
    Read all of them a few times. Brilliant start and brilliant finish. The middle is what's tends to lose people with pointless storylines and very repetitive things like the straightening of skirts and pulling of braids.
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

  19. #399
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim3k View Post
    About four months ago, I was invited, as an old man, to join an old man's book club...
    Your book club sounds interesting. Congrats on getting invited to join.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim3k View Post
    The third book is Hemingway's 1926 first novel, The Sun Also Rises. This is a relatively easy read, but a complex novel to discuss. Several of the group had read it long ago and were pleasantly surprised by themes and characters they had not really understood as youths. There is a lot to see in his characters that is initially unclear. The book has been analyzed by thousands of professional critics and many of them say things that we did not see, or things that we rejected. In any event, readers in their 60s or 70s have a worldview that younger people do not. Still, Hemingway wrote this in 1925 when he was only 26 and the layers of his reality as a writer are impressive. It's a good club book.
    The Sun Also Rises is my second favorite Hemingway book after For Whom the Bell Tolls. Hemingway books drip with passion and have interesting characters.
    Bob Green
    DBR Survivor Football Champion
    2010 & 2016

  20. #400
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    I finished Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. I liked it. Short, quick read. He does a good job of simplifying things for us lay people. Starting Ill Will by Dan Chaon. My wife picked it up from the library for me. Sounds interesting enough.
    I have it but haven't gotten around to it yet. Maybe when I fly next I'll take it and read it on the plane.

    Quote Originally Posted by luburch View Post
    So I just finished the Red Rising Trilogy by Piece Brown. If you enjoyed the Hunger Game series or Ender's Game then I highly recommend it.

    I was curious what everyone else is reading or had finished reading recently and if anyone had any recommendations?

    I will read pretty much anything I can get my hands on. Fiction, non-fiction, sci-fi, doesn't make a difference. Debating starting the Game of Thrones series..

    Recently, I've read the three JK Rowling detective novels, Life is Not an Accident (J-Will), and The Hobbit.

    Anyone have anything they're reading now or that they recommend? I figured this thread could be a nice soundboard for those looking for something new to read.
    Quote Originally Posted by jazonbrink23 View Post
    Can't go wrong with Dark Tower. If you want another YA (too young, but enjoyable) check out the Necrosanguin series. If you want some bigger stories with awesome worlds and magic systems, check out anything in Brandon Sanderson's Cosmere Universe.


    Loved Red Rising series, thought it was better than Hunger Games too. You should read some of Brandon Sandersons books, the Stormlight Archives will probably be his masterpiece when he finishes it but Mistborn is good also.


    In case I haven't mentioned it before in here, I'll say it again.

    Read the King Killer Chronicles!!!!!!! Book 1 is called The Name of the Wind and it's amazing and I need people I can discuss stuff with (3rd and final book isn't out yet).
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

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