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  1. #461
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC

    The Beatles

    Really enjoyed Tune In: The Beatles: All These Years Vol. 1 by Mark Lewisohn. Story begins in 1957 and takes us to the eve of their first number 1 hit in the UK.
    Amazing in depth telling of how they became what was unleashed on the world in 1964. It is all here.
    They were determined to be bigger than Elvis. Truly driven but without
    Brian Epstein probably would have remained a regional sensation and ultimately breaking up. Shows the hard work, luck here and there and a aggressive manager
    who believed in the boys. Many myths are dispelled. Some very "interesting" characters came their way. Lewisohn takes you on a tour that is fun and somewhat magical.
    These guys knew they had it and never feared to be themselves, which was unique.

  2. #462
    Have enjoyed reading the "Awaken Online" series by Travis Bagwell. It's sci fi and the premise is a new, immersive virtual reality game is launched called AO. Story is told from the perspective of the villain, which is new and interesting. It reminds me of "Ready Player One," although the characters are more interesting and there isn't a derth of pop culture references. It's available on the Kindle pretty cheap, and there are about 6 or so books now. It's one of those universes with endless possibilities.

    Also picked up the Tripods Trilogy by John Christopher. It's a bit dated (I think it came out in the late 60's), and is told in the first person, which I'm not crazy about personally. It's kind of a combination of "War of the Worlds" with a cross country journey thrown in a la "Lord of the Rings," but without the fantasy element. It's a quick read, probably more for kids than adults. I remember seeing the comics in "Boy's Life" magazine when I was a kid in the 1980's.

    Last one I gave up on was "The Company of the Dead" by David Kowalski. Premise was very interesting - set in an alternate future whereby the US lost WWI and the south seceded again, confederate separatists uncover a time machine and a chance to change history by boarding the Titanic. Unfortunately, the storytelling falls flat - there are way too many characters and the author parcels out the backstory as small anecdotes here and there, which is confusing. And the narrative is constantly shifting between time periods and flashbacks, which adds to the disconnected nature. After a couple hundred pages (out of 751), I finally moved on.

    My wife wants me to read "The boys in the boat," by Daniel James Brown, which is on my to do list.
    "There can BE only one."

  3. #463
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    "My wife wants me to read "The boys in the boat," by Daniel James Brown, which is on my to do list."


    "The Boys in the Boat" is a great story and well written.

  4. #464
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh
    Just started The Ghost Army of World War II by Rick Beyer and Elizabeth Sayles, whose father was a member of the Ghost Army.
    [redacted] them and the horses they rode in on.

  5. #465
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    Have enjoyed reading the "Awaken Online" series by Travis Bagwell. It's sci fi and the premise is a new, immersive virtual reality game is launched called AO. Story is told from the perspective of the villain, which is new and interesting. It reminds me of "Ready Player One," although the characters are more interesting and there isn't a derth of pop culture references. It's available on the Kindle pretty cheap, and there are about 6 or so books now. It's one of those universes with endless possibilities.
    I've been reading these also. They are fun and inventive (at least to me, not having read much in this genre), though the writing itself is pretty plain. Not sure I would call the main character (Jason) the "villain", though - rather, the books are just subverting the usual fantasy expectations by having the protagonist be a "Dark" wizard-type (complete with undead minions) and his main antagonist, a champion of the "Light", is a sadistic and nasty piece of work both in real life and in the game. I also liked his most recent "side quest" novel about the Fire wizard, especially the main character, Finn.

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander View Post
    Also picked up the Tripods Trilogy by John Christopher. It's a bit dated (I think it came out in the late 60's), and is told in the first person, which I'm not crazy about personally. It's kind of a combination of "War of the Worlds" with a cross country journey thrown in a la "Lord of the Rings," but without the fantasy element. It's a quick read, probably more for kids than adults. I remember seeing the comics in "Boy's Life" magazine when I was a kid in the 1980's.
    Did you like this series? I read it as a kid (remember the Boy's Life comics too!) but don't remember it that well. I was thinking my two older kids (12 and 9) might like them.

  6. #466
    Quote Originally Posted by crimsondevil View Post
    I've been reading these also. They are fun and inventive (at least to me, not having read much in this genre), though the writing itself is pretty plain. Not sure I would call the main character (Jason) the "villain", though - rather, the books are just subverting the usual fantasy expectations by having the protagonist be a "Dark" wizard-type (complete with undead minions) and his main antagonist, a champion of the "Light", is a sadistic and nasty piece of work both in real life and in the game. I also liked his most recent "side quest" novel about the Fire wizard, especially the main character, Finn.



    Did you like this series? I read it as a kid (remember the Boy's Life comics too!) but don't remember it that well. I was thinking my two older kids (12 and 9) might like them.
    Agree on Jason not being the "villan" per se; I used that b/c one of the taglines for the book described him as the villain. I enjoyed Unity, which was Frank's side quest. I've just started the most recent one.

    The tripods trilogy is pretty meh on a reread. There isn't a whole lot that happens in the first book, and the characters aren't very deep. It was probably pretty good during its time, but it's a bit dated now IMO. Middle schoolers might like it if they are big readers, but a HS probably wouldn't.
    "There can BE only one."

  7. #467
    Finished Home Coffee Roasting, Romance & Revival by Kenneth Davids.

    As a romantic, this book was a fun read.
    With a publish date of 1996, updated in 2003, its a sad testament to how certain books age, and are replaced by a bevy of web pages.

  8. #468
    Hound of the Baskervilles

  9. #469
    put this in the Neil Peart thread, but thought it fit here as well. To anyone interested in reading some of Neil Peart's (drummer of Rush) books, Audible has them available for FREE download thru (I believe) January 28th. I've started reading "Ghost Rider" and it's pretty enlightening actually. This one covers his life following the sudden death of both his wife and daughter, 6 months apart. The grief is palpable, but his journey through it is equally enlightening. Neil seems to be the type of guy who wasn't comfortable unless he was busy, and I can relate to that. While he missed out on his later years, he probably crammed more adventures into his 67 years than most of us would in 3 lifetimes.

    https://www.audible.com/author/Neil-Peart/B000APH4T0
    "There can BE only one."

  10. #470
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN.
    Finished the first Dune novel and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy recently.

    Second in the Dune series and Lord of the Flies are coming up next. Trying to cover some of the 'classics' I've missed.

  11. #471
    Quote Originally Posted by devildeac View Post
    Just started The Ghost Army of World War II by Rick Beyer and Elizabeth Sayles, whose father was a member of the Ghost Army.

    Ooo, saw a review on that, would like to hear what you think.
    Nothing incites bodily violence quicker than a Duke fan turning in your direction and saying 'scoreboard.'

  12. #472
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by luburch View Post
    Finished the first Dune novel and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy recently.

    Second in the Dune series and Lord of the Flies are coming up next. Trying to cover some of the 'classics' I've missed.
    I personally think Hitchhiker's should be required reading for everyone on the planet. Pure genius.

  13. #473
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by aimo View Post
    I personally think Hitchhiker's should be required reading for everyone on the planet. Pure genius.
    Just this planet?

  14. #474
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    Just this planet?
    I knew someone would pick up on that. Nope, all planets.

  15. #475
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Quote Originally Posted by aimo View Post
    I personally think Hitchhiker's should be required reading for everyone on the planet. Pure genius.
    Donít panic. Bring a towel.

    I am listening to a long audiobook for weekend walks ó Danubia by Simon Winder, about the Habsburg Empire. More interesting than it sounds.
    "We're only tourists in this life
    Only tourists but the view is nice"

    -- David Byrne

  16. #476
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    I just finished "Everything I Never Told You" by Celeste Ng ( how do you pronounce that last name). I have been encouraged to broaden my horizons and read some contemporary women writers.

    Excellent, sad, thoughtful book.

  17. #477
    Into the Alex Hawke series...just started book 2. Pretty good so far. Hawke is a little too perfect...but fun stuff.
    Don't waste your time on House of Cards S6!
    -We found out Frank was critical to making anyone else in the show interesting...not a surprise...

  18. #478
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    The Call of the Wild remake prompted me to start reading Jack London. I've read that one, White Fang, and I'm almost through with The Sea Wolf. Apparently the Kindle edition I have must include all of his short stories. Don't know when I'll take a breather and read something else. There's still 85% of the collection to finish.

    I know he was accused of plagiarism at least twice, and his novels supposedly don't measure up in some technical ways. But I can't wait to start some short stories. Jack London is a master.
    Man, if your Mom made you wear that color when you were a baby, and you're still wearing it, it's time to grow up!

  19. #479
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outside Philly
    Quote Originally Posted by killerleft View Post
    The Call of the Wild remake prompted me to start reading Jack London. I've read that one, White Fang, and I'm almost through with The Sea Wolf. Apparently the Kindle edition I have must include all of his short stories. Don't know when I'll take a breather and read something else. There's still 85% of the collection to finish.

    I know he was accused of plagiarism at least twice, and his novels supposedly don't measure up in some technical ways. But I can't wait to start some short stories. Jack London is a master.



    1. To Build a Fire is one of my favorite short stories.

    2. London's brand was synonymous with his characters and stories. One of my great disappointments growing up was learning that London was, ahem, not like the characters in his books.

  20. #480
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by bundabergdevil View Post
    [/B]

    1. To Build a Fire is one of my favorite short stories.

    2. London's brand was synonymous with his characters and stories. One of my great disappointments growing up was learning that London was, ahem, not like the characters in his books.
    I read that he went to the Klondike. I assumed he was seeking his fortune in gold. He didn't work the upstairs in a saloon, did he?
    Man, if your Mom made you wear that color when you were a baby, and you're still wearing it, it's time to grow up!

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