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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Mount Kisco, NY

    New NBA Commissioner Silver advocates

    I have been meaning to start a thread on this since the new NBA commish, Duke alum Adam Silver, is strongly advocating an increase in the current 19 year old/one year removed from HS graduation age limit.

    "At the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston a few weeks ago, NBA commissioner Adam Silver raised some eyebrows when he declared that raising the age limit for the NBA draft from 19 to 20 is a matter of great importance on his agenda."
    http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10...playoffs-draft

    ESPN.com has been really digging into the topic over the past few days with point/counterpoint takes of all kinds.

    While Silver hasn't fully outlined his vision, it seems to be heading this way:

    -If a kid goes to college, he has to stay 2 years
    -If a kid doesn't go to college, he could go straight to the D-League for a year, but not the NBA. He would be eligible for the NBA draft at 19.

    One would assume this would make college more attractive because the D league doesn't pay much and the opportunity to "brand" oneself is greater with the national TV exposure that college programs get, plus all of the oft stated positives of the college experience (great coaching, atmosphere, classes and campus life).

    But, there is also a huge push for every team in the NBA to have their own D-League team in order to create a true, 30 team minor league system. This could eventually make the D-League a more formidable competitor, as if the "get drafted at 19" lure isn't attractive enough.

    Obviously, the players association will have something to say about it, but the D-League option makes it seem like this idea could really fly in the near future. What do you guys think?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    While it's been a few years since I looked into this, I believe Silver's suggestion is similar to what Coach K has advocated in the past, without the D League wrinkle. Coach K suggested a "none or 2" year rule which, essentially, required a high school senior to "unpack his bags" and make a 2 year commitment to college or go directly to the NBA from high school.
    Rich
    "Failure is Not a Destination"
    Coach K on the Dan Patrick Show, December 22, 2016

  3. #3

    Some Questions

    Why force someone who wants to play pro ball right after high school to play one year in the D League?

    I assume high school players would declare for pro, then could be drafted, and would spend a year in the D League at the team of their choice. If not drafted, then D League free agents or overseas?

    I guess the D League experience would help some players mature before the NBA, but then again the D League probably might be a tough environment as well.

    Players like LeBron or Jabari would have to decide between one year of D League ball at low pay, exposure etc. verses two years of college ball.

    If this is a step towards baseball style, ie after high school declare for college and wait 3 years or declare pro and go right away, fine with me. Baseball style requires a good minor league system and maybe this will strengthen the D League and provide it for basketball.

    SoCal

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Dat View Post
    I have been meaning to start a thread on this since the new NBA commish, Duke alum Adam Silver, is strongly advocating an increase in the current 19 year old/one year removed from HS graduation age limit.

    "At the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston a few weeks ago, NBA commissioner Adam Silver raised some eyebrows when he declared that raising the age limit for the NBA draft from 19 to 20 is a matter of great importance on his agenda."
    http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10...playoffs-draft

    ESPN.com has been really digging into the topic over the past few days with point/counterpoint takes of all kinds.

    While Silver hasn't fully outlined his vision, it seems to be heading this way:

    -If a kid goes to college, he has to stay 2 years
    -If a kid doesn't go to college, he could go straight to the D-League for a year, but not the NBA. He would be eligible for the NBA draft at 19.

    One would assume this would make college more attractive because the D league doesn't pay much and the opportunity to "brand" oneself is greater with the national TV exposure that college programs get, plus all of the oft stated positives of the college experience (great coaching, atmosphere, classes and campus life).

    But, there is also a huge push for every team in the NBA to have their own D-League team in order to create a true, 30 team minor league system. This could eventually make the D-League a more formidable competitor, as if the "get drafted at 19" lure isn't attractive enough.

    Obviously, the players association will have something to say about it, but the D-League option makes it seem like this idea could really fly in the near future. What do you guys think?
    If I'm reading you right, I think most possible high draft picks would go straight to the D league. Why go to college and be stuck for 2 years instead of one (and get rookie contract a year later)? I think there is a good chance this would firmly establish the D league as the next step of choice for elite HS basketball players.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Raleigh, NC
    Quote Originally Posted by bob blue devil View Post
    If I'm reading you right, I think most possible high draft picks would go straight to the D league. Why go to college and be stuck for 2 years instead of one (and get rookie contract a year later)? I think there is a good chance this would firmly establish the D league as the next step of choice for elite HS basketball players.
    I think this also smart of Silver because kids *will* choose the D-league and it will raise the profile of that league and perhaps make it less of a financial burden on the NBA.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDukeFan View Post

    Players like LeBron or Jabari would have to decide between one year of D League ball at low pay, exposure etc. verses two years of college ball.
    On the other hand, if the Lebrons or the Jabaris of the world were playing in the D-League, more people would be paying attention to it, so the exposure gap b/t that and college could narrow considerably.

    I agree it seems like an idea designed to help grow the D-League.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Arlington, VA
    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDukeFan View Post
    Why force someone who wants to play pro ball right after high school to play one year in the D League?

    I assume high school players would declare for pro, then could be drafted, and would spend a year in the D League at the team of their choice. If not drafted, then D League free agents or overseas?

    I guess the D League experience would help some players mature before the NBA, but then again the D League probably might be a tough environment as well.

    Players like LeBron or Jabari would have to decide between one year of D League ball at low pay, exposure etc. verses two years of college ball.

    If this is a step towards baseball style, ie after high school declare for college and wait 3 years or declare pro and go right away, fine with me. Baseball style requires a good minor league system and maybe this will strengthen the D League and provide it for basketball.

    SoCal
    I assume the reason to force players to spend a year in the D league is, essentially, the Kwame Brown rule--to save teams from their own foolishness in drafting raw high school players on potential that doesn't pan out--as well as to raise the profile of the D league.

    In terms of competition between the D league and college for the top high school players, that's fine with me. While it might mean we don't see some transcendent players in the the college game, it will also mean that most/all players we do see have made a commitment, at some level, to actually go to college, and the coaches will have more of a chance to put together teams that work together in a team-oriented game. The college players who hope to go pro will likely be later bloomers with a strong incentive to work hard and improve their skills.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Matches View Post
    On the other hand, if the Lebrons or the Jabaris of the world were playing in the D-League, more people would be paying attention to it, so the exposure gap b/t that and college could narrow considerably.

    I agree it seems like an idea designed to help grow the D-League.
    I agree, but nobody really pays attention to the minor leagues in MLB (**ducking** all the Durham Bulls fans). But, seriously, around the country, most people wouldn't be able to name a team. I do think having high profile high school players may make going to games more appealing as a reasonably priced family outing, though, so it's certainly growing it in that way. Incidentally, anybody see the recent suit from minor league baseball players arguing they get paid below minimum wage and many are below the poverty line? Seems disgraceful to me considering how much pro ballers get paid - could at least give $40k to the minor leaguers, which wouldn't impact the organizations at all. I think the NBADL players actually get a livable wage (although nothing compared to NBA players, of course). In general, I think I like the concept...

  9. #9
    How would this work with Euro-league players - would they get the same 19yr rule they have now or would we push them to 2 and out. If the Euro-league rule stayed unchanged I think this would push more players to europe (better pay, conditions, & exposure than the D-League)

    ...of course I thought 2-3 players a year would have followed Brandon Jennings example under the current rules so I may just be wrong about this...

  10. #10
    Dev11's Avatar
    Dev11 is offline Commissioner of Statistics, DBR Podcast
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    What would prevent a player from going to the D-League after a year of college, if he isn't doing well in the classes or wants to make a few more bucks (Kentucky notwithstanding).

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dev11 View Post
    What would prevent a player from going to the D-League after a year of college, if he isn't doing well in the classes or wants to make a few more bucks (Kentucky notwithstanding).
    Nothing. But that's not Silver's concern. His concern is simply the welfare of the NBA. And the NBA profits from such an idea in two ways:

    1. More marketable college players being drafted
    2. The NBDL getting higher-quality talent, thus perhaps being less of a financial drain on the NBA
    3. Even better awareness of the quality of the players being drafted (i.e., a little bit less screwing up by the NBA GMs)

    We should not believe that Silver's suggestion is intended to benefit college basketball in any way. It's not. If a player chooses to go to college but decides to leave after one year, that's fine. They still have to wait another year to go to the NBA.

    Remember: there is no rule that players have to go to college for a year. They just have to be a year removed from high school. Kids could go to Europe or the D-League now and forego college. It's just that college is still the mainstream approach, so most kids take that route for the one year that they have to do so.

    In reality, I suspect most kids that would choose to go to college would continue for their two years rather than leave after one for the NBDL.

  12. #12
    While this is preferable to the current system, I wish the abolish the whole you have to wait a year system. first it puts kids in college that don't want to be, which takes away scholarships, if they were really committed to making the D League a true minor league system they would let the kids who wanna go straight through to the league into the D league. if they are a LeBron, or a KD they will get Called up during their first year and more than likely stick. if they aren't then they do their 1-2 years and then they can enter the draft.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I agree, but nobody really pays attention to the minor leagues in MLB (**ducking** all the Durham Bulls fans). But, seriously, around the country, most people wouldn't be able to name a team.
    Basketball's a more individual-driven sport than baseball though. Lebron's high school games were on television. Had he played in the D-League that would've been on TV too. It might not take off to the level of popularity that college ball has now, but interest would pick up.

  14. #14
    I think the secret to minor league ball is 2-for-1 beer night. I've never been a huge baseball fan but I attended quite a few Columbia Mets games in the 80s. on second thought the drinking age changed 30-years ago and I think they probably actually check IDs now so that may not work either.

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Chad Ford chat opinion

    Brad (Toronto)
    Thoughts on Adam Silver wanting to increase the age limit? Why doesn't the NBA look for ways to expand its own D-League instead?

    Chad Ford (1:44 PM)
    Been writing about this for the past two days. It's a mixed blessing. Will help some players tremendously, others it will hinder. LeBron didn't need college. Neither did Kobe or KG. But for so many others, it's the best choice. But I don't think the league should be so paternalistic personally. These young men should have the choice and live with the consequences. Better education, a reformed high school system and compensation for them when they play in college would take care of so much. I'd rather the players choose to stay in college because they felt the benefit was equal to or better than the NBA at the moment. The NCAA is broken. High school basketball is broken. Forcing players to stay longer in that system doesn't fix the problem.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Matches View Post
    Basketball's a more individual-driven sport than baseball though. Lebron's high school games were on television. Had he played in the D-League that would've been on TV too. It might not take off to the level of popularity that college ball has now, but interest would pick up.
    imagine if the D-league had Monta ellis, Jr smith, and josh smith for two years. that would be some fun basketball.

  17. #17
    [QUOTE=Billy Dat;713674]Chad Ford chat opinion

    Brad (Toronto)
    Thoughts on Adam Silver wanting to increase the age limit? Why doesn't the NBA look for ways to expand its own D-League instead?

    Chad Ford (1:44 PM)
    Been writing about this for the past two days. It's a mixed blessing. Will help some players tremendously, others it will hinder. LeBron didn't need college. Neither did Kobe or KG. But for so many others, it's the best choice. But I don't think the league should be so paternalistic personally. These young men should have the choice and live with the consequences. Better education, a reformed high school system and compensation for them when they play in college would take care of so much. I'd rather the players choose to stay in college because they felt the benefit was equal to or better than the NBA at the moment. The NCAA is broken. High school basketball is broken. Forcing players to stay longer in that system doesn't fix the problem.[/
    QUOTE]I agree with all of this. tremendously.

  18. #18
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    A Simmons mailbag take

    Q: How about a rule that restricts one-and-done players to a five year rookie deal and anyone who stays in college two years or longer to get a 4 year rookie deal?
    óCharles Smith, Brooklyn

    SG: I like it! Thatís the biggest obstacle to Adam Silverís desire for an under-20 age limit for the draft ó every powerful agent despises that idea because it delays the second contract by one year. If Jabari leaves Duke this summer, heíd sign his max extension in 2018 and the contract would officially start in the 2018-19 season. If he doesnít leave until 2015, that timetable gets pushed back to 2019 (extension) and the 2019-20 season (when it kicks in). Thatís why youíll see Jabari Parker awkwardly putting on a Jazz/Sixers/Celtics/Lakers/Bucks cap and hugging Adam Silver on June 26, 2014. Itís not about the first contract; itís about the second one.

    Iíd suggest this tweak: five-year rookie deals for one-and-done guys and under-20-year-olds; four-year rookie deals for two-and-done guys and 20-year-olds; and three-year rookie deals for everyone else. That would give prospects a real incentive to stay in school, right? Sadly, Silver canít discuss this idea (or any draft-related tweaks) with the National Basketball Players Association because thereís nobody running it right now. Billy Hunter didnít just run that thing into the ground; he packed it with explosives and detonated 60 years of history. Nobody seems to care. By the way? Iím not sure Silver and the owners care, either ó they say publicly how itís frustrating not to have anyone to negotiate with, but really, everything gets to stay the same for them as long as the playersí union is fractured. Right now, itís an owner-friendly CBA. Theyíre raking in money. I donít see the age limit thing changing any time soon.

  19. #19
    Join Date
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    Washington, D.C.

    I like it too

    I've been suggesting something similar here for years. Glad to see the idea is being considered by Simmons. It seems to me the initial rookie cap has the perverse effect of pushing kids out of college.

  20. #20
    . . . The NCAA is broken. High school basketball is broken. Forcing players to stay longer in that system doesn't fix the problem.[/QUOTE]

    The NBA is broken too. Players don't know how to play, they don't learn how to play sitting on the bench and there are not many practices. Players are too young and generally too immature for the life style. The NBA for its own benefit should either take players out of high school (which they may screw up as they did before) or not let players in for 3 years. They will get a much better product (compare Mason Plumlee as a sohomore to his senior year). The union should be happy since it protects jobs, the league should be happy because it will make fewer mistakes and get players who have had at least 3 years of college coaching and more mature individuals. The Lebrons of the world could go straight to the pros out of high school. It seems to work for baseball and football without all the gnashing of teeth that we see in basketball.

    Shortening the rookie contracts for those who to college seems like a good idea too if they are worried about the players which is doubtful.

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