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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ohio

    Duke Men's BB Workout Program

    I was browsing dukeblueplanet and saw a the Duke Sample Workout Program and thought I would try it out.

    http://www.dukeblueplanet.com/content.asp?tid=120

    Let me tell you it is no joke. I am not in the best shape but I am not in bad shape by any means and this workout is just too much for me. I tried it out for a couple of weeks and I have even more respect for how much work the players put in just to be ready to go on gameday.

    I suggest trying it out, it may have the same effect on you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dallas
    I'm tired from reading it

  3. #3
    Thanks for the post. This looks pretty intense!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by noyac View Post
    I was browsing dukeblueplanet and saw a the Duke Sample Workout Program and thought I would try it out.

    http://www.dukeblueplanet.com/content.asp?tid=120

    Let me tell you it is no joke. I am not in the best shape but I am not in bad shape by any means and this workout is just too much for me. I tried it out for a couple of weeks and I have even more respect for how much work the players put in just to be ready to go on gameday.

    I suggest trying it out, it may have the same effect on you.
    Doesn't Coach K know he is going to tire out his players for the NCAAs by working them out too much. First he plays guys too long in games in the regular season - and we all know how that leads to tired legs- and now this? Not sure if this guy is going to make it as a head coach.
    dukelifer

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    I am underwhelmed by most of this.

    Pet peave, the "defensive stqnce": it makes no sense to me, no athletic move that calls for a straight back does. I don't see how this facilitates good balance, an ability to move in any direction; or quickness. I see in it the contrary in each of these respects.

    That is not to say that terrific athletes cannot perform in such a stance, even if they have to overcome their own cross-motivated efforts to actually defend someone. Sure they can. The cost, my real pet peave: potential for injury. Where? Well, you try that stance and move the way guards do, especially pressuring the exterior. Notice, if you can (you probably can't with all the efforting that this will take) how your feet and ankles feel.

    Then take the same stance, only let your ribs and spine be soft and curved so your pelvis is tucked slightly under and your head arched slightly, not anywhere near the front of your foot, forward of your shoulcers and everything in between arched. Now try it. Easier? Notice how your feet and ankles feel. Nicer? More movement available?

    Core exercizes: Yeesh. With all that core work, how much residual tension is left in those muscles when you are done? What do the back muscles have to overcome to strike that defensive pose we are asking of these guys. that's right, boyz and girls, the residual tension left by all this core work. In addition, you habituate this core work, place it in the core of one's mind, it infuses lots of movements that depend on a soft core, and you have people like Miles getting off balance whenever he tries to head fake.

    More later.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Asotin, WA
    Quote Originally Posted by noyac View Post
    I was browsing dukeblueplanet and saw a the Duke Sample Workout Program and thought I would try it out.

    Let me tell you it is no joke.... I suggest trying it out, it may have the same effect on you.
    I'd never survive the jump rope exercises. Two feet, one foot, switch, lunge...I'd be hog-tied and the laughing stock of the house...

    Well, hog-tied, anyway. My girls and wife have pretty much resigned themselves to my antics by now.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Nashville
    Mmmmm, yes. When reminiscing about the ol' "glory days", it's funny how the memory tends to conveniently leave out miserable details like these. Now I remember why I don't really miss being an athlete. I used to not even like going on family vacations for more than a couple of days because I could just feel my conditioning dropping off, and I'd start dreading the return to these kind of workouts. It's easy to forget how hard these kids work outside of the 2 hour windows we see them in!

    Ahhhhhhhhhhhh, to be fat and happy!

  8. #8
    Still remember those uneven stairs at Wally Wade, and that hill about 7k in on the Washington Duke x-country trail, with great disgust and fear.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    Core exercizes: Yeesh. With all that core work, how much residual tension is left in those muscles when you are done? What do the back muscles have to overcome to strike that defensive pose we are asking of these guys. that's right, boyz and girls, the residual tension left by all this core work. In addition, you habituate this core work, place it in the core of one's mind, it infuses lots of movements that depend on a soft core, and you have people like Miles getting off balance whenever he tries to head fake.

    More later.
    I don't think it's meant to suggest that you should do all the core exercises listed all at once. Rather, you choose a group of the core exercises and do those all at the same time...That sounds reasonable to me.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    I am underwhelmed by most of this.

    Pet peave, the "defensive stance": it makes no sense to me, no athletic move that calls for a straight back does. I don't see how this facilitates good balance, an ability to move in any direction; or quickness. I see in it the contrary in each of these respects.

    That is not to say that terrific athletes cannot perform in such a stance, even if they have to overcome their own cross-motivated efforts to actually defend someone. Sure they can. The cost, my real pet peave: potential for injury. Where? Well, you try that stance and move the way guards do, especially pressuring the exterior. Notice, if you can (you probably can't with all the efforting that this will take) how your feet and ankles feel.

    Then take the same stance, only let your ribs and spine be soft and curved so your pelvis is tucked slightly under and your head arched slightly, not anywhere near the front of your foot, forward of your shoulcers and everything in between arched. Now try it. Easier? Notice how your feet and ankles feel. Nicer? More movement available?

    Core exercizes: Yeesh. With all that core work, how much residual tension is left in those muscles when you are done? What do the back muscles have to overcome to strike that defensive pose we are asking of these guys. that's right, boyz and girls, the residual tension left by all this core work. In addition, you habituate this core work, place it in the core of one's mind, it infuses lots of movements that depend on a soft core, and you have people like Miles getting off balance whenever he tries to head fake.

    More later.
    Its not saying keep your back straight in a game. This is just the proper way to do a wall sit. Our school used to do this as a punishment in PE in like 2nd thru 4th grade. The back straight puts more emphasis in the leg muscles and teaches better balance. Because when it gets down to the 4th quarter people get tired and tend to be lax on D and in their fundamenals and that is why this drill is important it promotes muscular stamina in your legs to keep you from getting so lax in your proper deffensive stance otherwise you would be standing upright and any competent basketball player could beat you to the rim.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluedog View Post
    I don't think it's meant to suggest that you should do all the core exercises listed all at once. Rather, you choose a group of the core exercises and do those all at the same time...That sounds reasonable to me.
    This. and your only doing core 4 days a week in the offseason (off on sunday, wednesday, and saturday) so their is an ample amount of time to rest the muscles (keep in mind this is designed for college athletes in specific and would be really difficult for the average Joe). When the season starts the probably would rest the day before a game and obviously not do any on game day either. (Probably cut all their sets/reps in half the day before a game if they do any drills)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dallas
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Ash View Post
    Still remember those uneven stairs at Wally Wade, and that hill about 7k in on the Washington Duke x-country trail, with great disgust and fear.
    Seriously, those uneven stairs got me pretty nervous on the way down. More than once I had to catch myself

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    The way I did the workout was conditioning in the morning (sprints, jump rope, etc.) and lifting/core in the evening. I never did core workout on days I lifted and I split up the running throughout the week.

    For example:
    Monday--Jump Rope Workout then On Court Workout
    Tuesday--Jump Rope Workout then Ladder Workout
    Wednesday--Basketball Work out
    Thursday--Rest
    Repeat

    Even with splitting it up like this it was very hard.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Arlington, VA

    What a Coincidence

    A trainer I worked with a couple times recently (she trains Secret Service agents too) named two separate workouts for me "Duke" and "Duke on Steroids". Mind you, I have been working out religiously and vigorously for 20 months now with a different trainer - I was sore for a week after each of these workouts. They are total body workouts that include 8 excercises for strength, balance, core and cardio - do 8 x 5 as fast as you can. Object is to beat your time the next time and move on to heavier weights. Mix and match the 8 and cardio and you get a great workout that keeps you winded (as much as you want). First one included 400 doorway jumps - basically jump high as you can in a doorway - 8 times, not too mention all the other leg stuff. Could not sit or stand up for a week without arm assistance!

    I'm definitely going to try some of the real Duke workout tonight.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina

    Please Help

    Anybody know where to find this workout now? I was wanting to give it a try but the link just says can not be found. I should have saved it when I first saw it, but alas I did not.
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge" -Stephen Hawking

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Skinker-DeBaliviere, Saint Louis
    I would have a straight-up infarction.

    Frankly, I don't think a regular person needs this kind of workout. Most of us aren't in the Tour de France.

    A movie is not about what it's about; it's about how it's about it.
    ---Roger Ebert


    Some questions cannot be answered
    Who’s gonna bury who
    We need a love like Johnny, Johnny and June
    ---Over the Rhine

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New York
    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post

    Core exercizes: Yeesh. With all that core work, how much residual tension is left in those muscles when you are done? What do the back muscles have to overcome to strike that defensive pose we are asking of these guys. that's right, boyz and girls, the residual tension left by all this core work. In addition, you habituate this core work, place it in the core of one's mind, it infuses lots of movements that depend on a soft core, and you have people like Miles getting off balance whenever he tries to head fake.
    Oh, the problem is graver, much graver, indeed. Miles showed *up* to Duke somewhat stiff and poorly balanced in the post. It seems as though the Duke workout is ruining athletes even at the high school level!

    I am curious, though. Can "core" magic be employed for the purposes of good? Can I put six-pack abs in the center of my consciousness and make them appear on my body? And how widespread are the dangers? Are all cores hazardous? If I think too much about the Earth's core, will I burst into flame?

    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    More later.
    Great!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albemarle, North Carolina
    So does anyone have a working link? Or a saved version they could send me?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Skinker-DeBaliviere, Saint Louis
    I'd like to have about 5% of Mason's core somewhere in my abdomen.

    A movie is not about what it's about; it's about how it's about it.
    ---Roger Ebert


    Some questions cannot be answered
    Who’s gonna bury who
    We need a love like Johnny, Johnny and June
    ---Over the Rhine

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    My core has been getting a bit softer over the years. Should I be considering that a good thing? It hasn't seemed to be helping me to play better basketball, but it might be just me.

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