PDA

View Full Version : Preventing ACL Injuries (Girls) and Women's Softball on TV



gw67
06-03-2008, 08:05 AM
In the past there have been posts discussing ACL injuries to girl athletes. This morningís Washington Post has an interesting article on a local study into the prevention of ACL injuries to girls.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/02/AR2008060202070.html

A few days ago, I saw in the paper that the NCAA baseball tournament had begun. I figured that some of the games would be on ESPN and I turned on the tube expecting to see the next superstar from Texas or Georgia Tech or another top baseball school. What did I find but womenís softball. I watched one game and found it entertaining but, while I played both fast and slow pitch softball years ago, I find it hard to believe that ESPN and their viewers prefer womenís softball to menís baseball. Did the NCAA force this down their throat or is there a large audience for softball?

gw67

Johnboy
06-03-2008, 10:28 AM
In the past there have been posts discussing ACL injuries to girl athletes. This morningís Washington Post has an interesting article on a local study into the prevention of ACL injuries to girls.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/02/AR2008060202070.html

A few days ago, I saw in the paper that the NCAA baseball tournament had begun. I figured that some of the games would be on ESPN and I turned on the tube expecting to see the next superstar from Texas or Georgia Tech or another top baseball school. What did I find but womenís softball. I watched one game and found it entertaining but, while I played both fast and slow pitch softball years ago, I find it hard to believe that ESPN and their viewers prefer womenís softball to menís baseball. Did the NCAA force this down their throat or is there a large audience for softball?

gw67

My baseball-playing 10 year old has been enjoying the games quite a bit and tuning in to these games over major league ball. These women don't fool around - the games are played fast, without a lot of standing around, adjusting equipment, stepping out of the batters box, etc. There have been exciting plays, too. I think the pace of the game is what my son likes as much as anything.

gw67
06-03-2008, 10:41 AM
I agree with your assessment of the play based on the game I watched. I coached baseball for many years and, one year, the manager of my niece's recreation-league softball team had a heart attack and couldn't participate for the remainder of the year. A couple of the dads came to me and asked me to help. In all my years of coaching, I've never had a more attentive bunch of players nor have I had better team spirit and sportsmanship.

My wife, sister-in-law and friends assurred me that was true for most girls sports.

My comment was not aimed at the pace and quality of play as much as it was the televising of women's softball over men's baseball.

gw67

BlueDevilBaby
06-03-2008, 10:55 AM
The men are not as far along in play as the women. Don't they start televising the men NCAA at the super regional round? My only complaint about women's college softball is the lack of offense because, in most cases, the pitching is so dominant. I get a little bored and tune out for an inning or two. Nevertheless, as a softball player in HS and a rec player now who loves baseball and softball, I have been watching.

Johnboy
06-03-2008, 11:05 AM
My comment was not aimed at the pace and quality of play as much as it was the televising of women's softball over men's baseball.


I'm guessing that, like Women's Basketball, the NCAA is forcing it on the networks, but I don't know. I've just found it interesting that my son has taken such an interest in the game - he'd be watching MLB if these college women weren't on. I also note that it's a championship tournament vs. regular season and college vs. professional (the team spirit of the women really shines through as it tends to in college sports generally). At any rate, I've been enjoying the games with him.

Your comment gave me an excuse to post about the existence of at least one market: young boys and their Dads!

Bluedawg
06-03-2008, 12:22 PM
A stronger outer quadriceps is a common problem among female athletes. My daughter, who is a dancer, had a problem with hers a couple of years ago. Luckily some specialized exercises corrected the problem.

greybeard
06-03-2008, 12:41 PM
For what it's worth, I don't like watching baseball. I enjoyed very much falling upon a few women's softball games. My only criticism, and it is a big one, is how they allow a single pitcher to dominate.

The good thing about women's pitching. No shoulder strain like in men's pitching (see Bryant Gumble Real Sports show with Mike Marshall for a solution to the men's problem that nobody wants to hear). However, I have noticed that a routine for these uber stars of women's softball is one of those mega knee braces. If the price of throwing that hard is a torn ACL, then something should be done to stop it.

What, you may ask, do you have in mind Greybeard, putting these gals on the clock and outlawing pitches above a certain speed? Gezz, now that you mention it, that . . . . Nope. What I have in mind is something far more sane, like limiting the number of innings a pitcher can pitch in a week. Seems that these stars get to pitch just about every game. With no wear on the shoulder, no need to sit them. Knees? They don't throw with no damn knees so who is concerned about them.

Anyway, if you limited the number of innings a pitcher could throw, perhaps even less than a full game, maybe half a game, then maybe there would be some more hitting, in which case maybe I'd find out what channel the games were being televised on and make sure I could watch. These gals can play! ;)