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greybeard
11-09-2007, 10:40 AM
Watch any NBA games lately? See coaches walkin onto the court, 10 feet in from the sidelines, while the play is going on. What's up with that?

Makes me want to throw something at my TV every time I see it. Some coach wandering out while play is going on, yelling things to his players to make sure that, to make sure that . . . . Actually, I don't know, what is it that they're trying to make sure of and how come it never seems to work?

You want to know why ratings are down (personally, I could care Less), I think it's the coaches treating the players like they were 10 year olds at the local gym. Come to think of it, those coach wannabes of the 10 year olds, trying to tell a bunch of kids who are just trying to stay upright what they SHOULD DO to make everyone in the stands oh so proud of the progress the kids have made, must have gotten that idea some where.

How can anybody root for anybody who has to be told what to do each time down the court? Players used to venerated not just for how high they could jump or how sweet their shots were, but also and more importantly how they ran the game. Coaches would call time outs if they wanted to yell at a ref, or in my high school coach's case, if he had a question to ask one of the players, like, "Who told you you could think?" Problem was nobody invented hand signals back and everybody on the team knew that Coach was only playing five guys, no matter what. So no one would have listened anyway.

And, football. Don't you just love it that guys have playbooks bigger than all the notebooks I ever kept put together in four years of college. And, then they watch film, and then excerpts of film focusing on just how the guy that they'll be going up against that week likes to do things in different circumstances. I think that they call them "tendencies."

Then, during the game, if someone on one side of the ball does something creative, actually thinks for himself during a game and makes an interesting play, then it gets really exciting. When the ball changes over, they cut to the sideline, and I swear I seen this, you see some 350 pound farm boy from Nebraska or Brooklyn or someplace, examing faxed photos of the field. See, if the other guy is gonna think, they, the coaches, better "prepare" their guy to meet that challenge the next time out.

My only question is, what are they gonna do if someone dares to think on each play. Can we all say Bluetooth? "And then I say I've had enough what else can you show me." BZ

MChambers
11-09-2007, 01:28 PM
Watch any NBA games lately? See coaches walkin onto the court, 10 feet in from the sidelines, while the play is going on. What's up with that?

Makes me want to throw something at my TV every time I see it. Some coach wandering out while play is going on, yelling things to his players to make sure that, to make sure that . . . . Actually, I don't know, what is it that they're trying to make sure of and how come it never seems to work?

You want to know why ratings are down (personally, I could care Less), I think it's the coaches treating the players like they were 10 year olds at the local gym. Come to think of it, those coach wannabes of the 10 year olds, trying to tell a bunch of kids who are just trying to stay upright what they SHOULD DO to make everyone in the stands oh so proud of the progress the kids have made, must have gotten that idea some where.

How can anybody root for anybody who has to be told what to do each time down the court? Players used to venerated not just for how high they could jump or how sweet their shots were, but also and more importantly how they ran the game. Coaches would call time outs if they wanted to yell at a ref, or in my high school coach's case, if he had a question to ask one of the players, like, "Who told you you could think?" Problem was nobody invented hand signals back and everybody on the team knew that Coach was only playing five guys, no matter what. So no one would have listened anyway.

And, football. Don't you just love it that guys have playbooks bigger than all the notebooks I ever kept put together in four years of college. And, then they watch film, and then excerpts of film focusing on just how the guy that they'll be going up against that week likes to do things in different circumstances. I think that they call them "tendencies."

Then, during the game, if someone on one side of the ball does something creative, actually thinks for himself during a game and makes an interesting play, then it gets really exciting. When the ball changes over, they cut to the sideline, and I swear I seen this, you see some 350 pound farm boy from Nebraska or Brooklyn or someplace, examing faxed photos of the field. See, if the other guy is gonna think, they, the coaches, better "prepare" their guy to meet that challenge the next time out.

My only question is, what are they gonna do if someone dares to think on each play. Can we all say Bluetooth? "And then I say I've had enough what else can you show me." BZ

When he was the Bullets' coach (mid-80s?), and a young player named Enis Whatley was the point guard, Loughery would yell out instructions to Whatley in the half court offense. Very specific instructions, like who to look for coming off the screen.

Of course, it didn't work, for either one of them.

throatybeard
11-09-2007, 02:12 PM
Manning, and increasingly Roethlisberger, are acting as OCs on the field. Seems like thinking to me.

greybeard
11-09-2007, 10:41 PM
Manning, and increasingly Roethlisberger, are acting as OCs on the field. Seems like thinking to me.

Refreshing.