PDA

View Full Version : Hacking the free throw



NM Duke Fan
11-22-2017, 07:23 AM
With free throws one of the few major concerns for this team, thought this would be a timely article:

"So, without a defender, why do so many players struggle from the free throw line? Willie Green, a 12-year NBA veteran and assistant coach for the Golden State Warriors, explains that a lack of defense is part of what makes free throw shooting challenging. “We are used to a defender and without one, it can feel different,” says Green."

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/nov/22/free-throws-foul-shots-science-of-sports

UrinalCake
11-22-2017, 08:04 AM
Great article. I’ve always felt that free throw shooting is more mental than physical, but as this article suggests it’s a combination of both. The other factor is that you only get to shoot two (or one) at a time, in between doing a bunch of other things. Players may say they can shoot 90 out of 100 in an empty gym, but that’s mostly irrelevant because they’ve gotten into a rhythm and are just repeating the motion. All that matters is what they did in the first two.

I also feel like the dead silence in Cameron when we are shooting free throws is counter productive. Not only does it raise tension, it gives opposing fans free reign to scream whatever they want and everybody can hear them. A better move would be for our fans to make a shushing sound, simulating white noise and drowning out the background.

Dr. Rosenrosen
11-22-2017, 08:10 AM
With free throws one of the few major concerns for this team, thought this would be a timely article:

"So, without a defender, why do so many players struggle from the free throw line? Willie Green, a 12-year NBA veteran and assistant coach for the Golden State Warriors, explains that a lack of defense is part of what makes free throw shooting challenging. “We are used to a defender and without one, it can feel different,” says Green."

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/nov/22/free-throws-foul-shots-science-of-sports
Without reading the article, I am going to say routine, repetition and focus. My older son has a pretty good shot but his free throw form and consistency suffer when he slacks off of practicing. When he practices consistently his fundamental skills and focuses on form, he can make 10 in a row easily. And he's 11. I can't imagine there's a lot more to it than that for college kids and pros.

dukelifer
11-22-2017, 09:04 AM
Without reading the article, I am going to say routine, repetition and focus. My older son has a pretty good shot but his free throw form and consistency suffer when he slacks off of practicing. When he practices consistently his fundamental skills and focuses on form, he can make 10 in a row easily. And he's 11. I can't imagine there's a lot more to it than that for college kids and pros.

I always have thought that the challenge of the free throw is transitioning from sprinting/moving to stopping and shooting. In that transition- your heart rate is changing - your breathing is changing- your muscles are relaxing. Have your son do sprints each time before he attempts a free throw and then see how well he shoots.

Bluedog
11-22-2017, 09:24 AM
Great article. I’ve always felt that free throw shooting is more mental than physical, but as this article suggests it’s a combination of both. The other factor is that you only get to shoot two (or one) at a time, in between doing a bunch of other things. Players may say they can shoot 90 out of 100 in an empty gym, but that’s mostly irrelevant because they’ve gotten into a rhythm and are just repeating the motion. All that matters is what they did in the first two.

I also feel like the dead silence in Cameron when we are shooting free throws is counter productive. Not only does it raise tension, it gives opposing fans free reign to scream whatever they want and everybody can hear them. A better move would be for our fans to make a shushing sound, simulating white noise and drowning out the background.

JJ agrees and always said free throws in Cameron were tougher. In his last year, the Crazies just did an applause when he was at the line. I agree we should do something like that for all players.

Hingeknocker
11-22-2017, 12:22 PM
JJ agrees and always said free throws in Cameron were tougher. In his last year, the Crazies just did an applause when he was at the line. I agree we should do something like that for all players.

This happened because JJ specifically requested the Crazies do it, during one of the "behind closed doors" Q&A sessions he did with the students. I thought we did the soft applause thing for more than just his Senior year, but I could be mistaken. That's getting to be a long time ago!

I agree that the practice should have caught on as a tradition for all players.

jv001
11-22-2017, 12:27 PM
Great article. I’ve always felt that free throw shooting is more mental than physical, but as this article suggests it’s a combination of both. The other factor is that you only get to shoot two (or one) at a time, in between doing a bunch of other things. Players may say they can shoot 90 out of 100 in an empty gym, but that’s mostly irrelevant because they’ve gotten into a rhythm and are just repeating the motion. All that matters is what they did in the first two.

I also feel like the dead silence in Cameron when we are shooting free throws is counter productive. Not only does it raise tension, it gives opposing fans free reign to scream whatever they want and everybody can hear them. A better move would be for our fans to make a shushing sound, simulating white noise and drowning out the background.

I'm glad that my golfing buddies don't yell and scream while I'm over that 5 foot par putt. Then again, I might make more of them if they yelled and screamed. :cool: GODUKE!

BD80
11-22-2017, 12:34 PM
I'm glad that my golfing buddies don't yell and scream while I'm over that 5 foot par putt. Then again, I might make more of them if they yelled and screamed. :cool: GODUKE!

I need the rest of my foursome behind the hole leaning left, then suddenly swaying right as I'm about to strike the putt. Except for those times when they need to sway in the other direction.

It would always be helpful to have one of them lying behind the hole as a backstop, with the others being ready to track the ball if/when I manage to clear or circumvent the backstop.

fisheyes
11-22-2017, 12:43 PM
I need the rest of my foursome behind the hole leaning left, then suddenly swaying right as I'm about to strike the putt. Except for those times when they need to sway in the other direction.

It would always be helpful to have one of them lying behind the hole as a backstop, with the others being ready to track the ball if/when I manage to clear or circumvent the backstop.

As long as you don't bring along Speedo guy! :D