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View Full Version : Thoughts to Woody Durham



CameronBornAndBred
06-01-2016, 10:30 AM
His voice is slowly being taken away. I think it is so cool that he and Bob Harris grew up together in a small NC community, not knowing that they would both be part of the best rivalry in college sports.

http://www.wralsportsfan.com/longtime-unc-voice-will-be-silenced-by-progressive-disease/15744470/

Aladuke
06-01-2016, 02:44 PM
This will be very tough on the family and everyone who knows him. One of my best friends was diagnosed with this condition
three years ago. He was one of the most outgoing, socially active people that I have ever been around. He reached retirement
age, moved to a larger city to enjoy the finer restaurants, shopping, convenience to airports, etc., and received this diagnosis.
He has slipped away rather quickly, and now lives in a long term care facility. Losing the ability to speak is just part of the journey
for patients with this disease. It is heartbreaking, as there is no cure. My prayer would be for strength both for Woody, but especially
for his family and friends.

CPDUKEGUY24
06-01-2016, 03:03 PM
This will be very tough on the family and everyone who knows him. One of my best friends was diagnosed with this condition
three years ago. He was one of the most outgoing, socially active people that I have ever been around. He reached retirement
age, moved to a larger city to enjoy the finer restaurants, shopping, convenience to airports, etc., and received this diagnosis.
He has slipped away rather quickly, and now lives in a long term care facility. Losing the ability to speak is just part of the journey
for patients with this disease. It is heartbreaking, as there is no cure. My prayer would be for strength both for Woody, but especially
for his family and friends.

Well said Ala and condolences as well.

I have to share my only personal Woody connection. Around 1992 or so, my Aunt who was and is a rabid UNC fan (forgive her) made a request for Woody Durham to wish me a Happy Birthday during the early Duke/UNCh game (birthday is Feb. 3rd). Though she worked at UNC I'm sure that this was not a novel thing or a special request, this was actually a regular occurrence back then. I was suspicious when she told me I HAD to listen to the game on the radio, and not to spare my ears of the wiley Dickie V! Nonetheless, for a 10 year old from North Carolina, getting your name mentioned during THAT game was a highlight; even if it was from the opposing teams announcer! Woody is truly one classy gent, one of the true all around greats in announcing, even on his bias.

oldnavy
06-02-2016, 04:30 AM
Like the front page article stated, Woody was a GREAT announcer, he just did it for the wrong team.

He truly was one of the best. In fact, I think the team UNC has now with Eric Montross and Angel Jones (?) is very good.

Eric has the deep melodic voice and is both fair (as much as can be expected) and funny.

Dean Smith lost his memory before he died, probably his most obvious gift, and now Woody Durham is going to lose his voice.... cruel twists of life if you ask me.

Best of luck to Woody, I hope he does much better than expected and lives out the rest of his life in full voice!

Rich
06-03-2016, 10:51 AM
This will be very tough on the family and everyone who knows him. One of my best friends was diagnosed with this condition
three years ago. He was one of the most outgoing, socially active people that I have ever been around. He reached retirement
age, moved to a larger city to enjoy the finer restaurants, shopping, convenience to airports, etc., and received this diagnosis.
He has slipped away rather quickly, and now lives in a long term care facility. Losing the ability to speak is just part of the journey
for patients with this disease. It is heartbreaking, as there is no cure. My prayer would be for strength both for Woody, but especially
for his family and friends.

My mom's stroke left her with aphasia and I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. She understood and knew what she was trying to say, but couldn't find the right words to say it. When she did try to verbalize, she mixed up words and became so frustrated that she ended up completely withdrawing before she passed away a few years later. It's a cruel condition.

sandinmyshoes
06-03-2016, 11:55 AM
So very sad.

I confess that when Durham was in his prime, I preferred listening to him on neutral broadcasts over any others (except Duke's broadcasters when Duke was playing, of course). He was a master of setting the visualization of the game up for the listener. Back in the day when I had to sometimes listen to ACC tournament games on the radio, if neither UNC or Duke were playing I would always choose Durham's broadcast team over any others. Even in games in which his team was not playing, Durham tended to stay focused on what was happening on the court with very little of the wandering and babbling that infects modern broadcasting both on the radio and television.

johnb
06-03-2016, 12:17 PM
This will be very tough on the family and everyone who knows him. One of my best friends was diagnosed with this condition
three years ago. He was one of the most outgoing, socially active people that I have ever been around. He reached retirement
age, moved to a larger city to enjoy the finer restaurants, shopping, convenience to airports, etc., and received this diagnosis.
He has slipped away rather quickly, and now lives in a long term care facility. Losing the ability to speak is just part of the journey
for patients with this disease. It is heartbreaking, as there is no cure. My prayer would be for strength both for Woody, but especially
for his family and friends.

As noted, this is a rough diagnosis; aphasia is only part of it.

For those who want to learn more, primary progressive aphasia is now grouped under the broader umbrella of frontotemporal dementias.

an education website: http://memory.ucsf.edu/ftd/overview/ftd
an excellent charity: http://www.theaftd.org/