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53n206
01-13-2016, 03:50 PM
Violations lead to loss of all games in one year, team unable to participate in year end tournaments, loss of a recruit this year and one more year in the future, tiny monetary fine. What happens to the coach during the time of the violations, Haith, well of course he is still head coach at Tulsa University and, as far as I can see, nothing happens to him.

brevity
01-13-2016, 04:02 PM
Not that we don't take your word for it, but here's a link:
http://www.sportingnews.com/ncaa-basketball-news/4691146-missouri-ncaa-violations-vacating-wins-frank-haith


One donor was found responsible for running a sham internship program in which three Mizzou basketball players and one prospective player received housing, iPads, cash, meals, transportation and access to a local gym in exchange for work that was never performed. That was classified as a Level I NCAA violation the most serious.

BD80
01-13-2016, 04:16 PM
And another program in line watching to make sure unc gets hit harder than they.

SCMatt33
01-13-2016, 05:17 PM
Violations lead to loss of all games in one year, team unable to participate in year end tournaments, loss of a recruit this year and one more year in the future, tiny monetary fine. What happens to the coach during the time of the violations, Haith, well of course he is still head coach at Tulsa University and, as far as I can see, nothing happens to him.

Just for the record, these are self-imposed sanctions, so not really the NCAA "hitting" them, per say. This is also why the ban is taking effect this season as opposed to next, much like Syracuse last year. There could theoretically be more punishment coming from the NCAA, but I doubt anything extra that would be as big as the vacated wins or postseason ban will be added. There could, however, still be further punishments against Frank Haith, which the University of Missouri could not self-impose and would have to be handed down by the NCAA later when it issues its final report on the case.

That being said, I think the NCAA needs a rule that bans self-imposing penalties to take place in the current academic year. It's pretty disingenuous for the school to voluntarily take itself out of the postseason for the current year, then have the coach talk about how hurt he feels for the only senior on the roster. If you were that hurt, you'd take the ban next year and let your current juniors transfer if they wanted to.

devildeac
01-13-2016, 05:28 PM
From Jeff Goodman:

"Statement from Frank Haith's lawyer: "Coach Haith cooperated fully with the NCAA enforcement staff's investigation and we have been informed by the enforcement staff that Coach Haith will not be charged with any violations and, therefore, has been cleared of any wrongdoing. It has been Coach Haith's position throughout this investigation that he acted appropriately at all times and that he monitored his program and promoted an atmosphere of compliance. The fact that the enforcement staff has not charged Coach Haith with any violations validates our position."

Whoa! Where have we heard (something like) this before?

Wonder if any of the cheaters' coaches will try this defense...

cspan37421
01-13-2016, 05:31 PM
Boy, what bad luck for Frank Haith. He keeps getting jobs at schools with donors who are up to no good.

NSDukeFan
01-13-2016, 06:36 PM
From Jeff Goodman:

"Statement from Frank Haith's lawyer: "Coach Haith cooperated fully with the NCAA enforcement staff's investigation and we have been informed by the enforcement staff that Coach Haith will not be charged with any violations and, therefore, has been cleared of any wrongdoing. It has been Coach Haith's position throughout this investigation that he acted appropriately at all times and that he monitored his program and promoted an atmosphere of compliance. The fact that the enforcement staff has not charged Coach Haith with any violations validates our position."

Whoa! Where have we heard (something like) this before?

Wonder if any of the cheaters' coaches will try this defense...

Didn't they invent that defense?

NSDukeFan
01-13-2016, 06:39 PM
Violations lead to loss of all games in one year, team unable to participate in year end tournaments, loss of a recruit this year and one more year in the future, tiny monetary fine. What happens to the coach during the time of the violations, Haith, well of course he is still head coach at Tulsa University and, as far as I can see, nothing happens to him.

Why would anything happen to Haith? Doesn't his responsibility end as soon as the players step off the court? Then it becomes an academic matter, unless, of course, you are talking with an accreditation committee, in which case it is all athletic. I think I got that right?

BD80
01-13-2016, 08:02 PM
From Jeff Goodman:

"Statement from Frank Haith's lawyer: "Coach Haith cooperated fully with the NCAA enforcement staff's investigation and we have been informed by the enforcement staff that Coach Haith will not be charged with any violations and, therefore, has been cleared of any wrongdoing. It has been Coach Haith's position throughout this investigation that he acted appropriately at all times and that he monitored his program and promoted an atmosphere of compliance. The fact that the enforcement staff has not charged Coach Haith with any violations validates our position."

Whoa! Where have we heard (something like) this before?

Wonder if any of the cheaters' coaches will try this defense...

Did unc set this whole thing up as a test case? This is almost like a mock trial for arguments to be presented.

Doria
01-13-2016, 09:40 PM
Just for the record, these are self-imposed sanctions, so not really the NCAA "hitting" them, per say. This is also why the ban is taking effect this season as opposed to next, much like Syracuse last year. There could theoretically be more punishment coming from the NCAA, but I doubt anything extra that would be as big as the vacated wins or postseason ban will be added. There could, however, still be further punishments against Frank Haith, which the University of Missouri could not self-impose and would have to be handed down by the NCAA later when it issues its final report on the case.

That being said, I think the NCAA needs a rule that bans self-imposing penalties to take place in the current academic year. It's pretty disingenuous for the school to voluntarily take itself out of the postseason for the current year, then have the coach talk about how hurt he feels for the only senior on the roster. If you were that hurt, you'd take the ban next year and let your current juniors transfer if they wanted to.

Well, in the case of information suddenly coming to light in the midst of a given season, I can understand it, but I wouldn't be averse to banning it during the season otherwise. Still, I think these self-imposed penalties actually seem in the neighborhood of reasonable sanctions.

English
01-14-2016, 09:47 AM
That being said, I think the NCAA needs a rule that bans self-imposing penalties to take place in the current academic year. It's pretty disingenuous for the school to voluntarily take itself out of the postseason for the current year, then have the coach talk about how hurt he feels for the only senior on the roster. If you were that hurt, you'd take the ban next year and let your current juniors transfer if they wanted to.

Well, I think you're missing the larger litmus test--how is our team performing this season? If the team is excelling and in line for a run in the post-season, by all means, delay! If the team--for example, a Univ of Missouri basketball team that has set high marks for ineptitude--isn't flirting with post-season success, certainly impose self-sanctions and take your medicine now to preserve the possibility of the follow season's spoils.

I kid. It strikes me as disingenuous, as well. I haven't given much thought to the implications of always delaying self-imposed penalties to the following year, but it seems like a fair practice on its surface. Especially in instances where an NCAA investigation hasn't been ongoing since, say, 2011.

Tom B.
01-14-2016, 12:13 PM
Boy, what bad luck for Frank Haith. He keeps getting jobs at schools with donors who are up to no good.

On that point...the article on the DBR front page quotes a section from the NCAA's report on Miami from a few years back, which discusses how Haith and an assistant arranged for a booster (who was later incarcerated) to receive $10,000 in hush money in exchange for keeping quiet about violations at Miami.

I assume the booster in question was the infamous Nevin Shapiro, right? Talk about one of your all-time jackwagon posers.