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FerryFor50
02-14-2014, 11:04 AM
This could affect how Duke runs its plays. They like to run an up tempo offense at times. Seems like Nick Saban is backing this, too... wonder if losing to Auburn/Gus Malzahn has anything to do with it?

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/10453325/nick-saban-bret-bielema-backed-committee-proposal-slow-rule

They cite "injury concerns" as the reason, which is ludicrous. There isn't any scenario I can envision that causes more injuries because of faster play.

Beyond that, there are some interesting quotes...


Redding said the proposal was not made based on a study of data.

"I can't say there is hard physical evidence," he said. "It's more common sense."

Uh, what??? If the whole premise behind the rule change is the potential for injury, doesn't it make sense to have actual DATA supporting that claim and not "common sense," which mankind has proven again and again is extremely flawed?


Redding added he studied film of two games involving up-tempo offenses and only once in each game did a team snap the ball within 10 seconds of the 40-second clock starting.

"The majority of time was somewhere in the 20s," he said. "The average time was 17 seconds.

"You really don't impact what people are already doing."

Wow, TWO whole games? Which games? And you made a judgement on two games?

Aside from that, he says that teams don't really snap within 10 seconds of the clock starting. So why change anything?

I'd be curious if they took into account all the FAKED injuries players used to stop play...

throatybeard
02-14-2014, 11:31 AM
There was an ESPN poll asking if you thought this was a good idea. I can't find it, but I think it was something like 90% no.

Atlanta Duke
02-14-2014, 08:28 PM
Nick Saban and his co-conspirator Bret Bielema have been pushing for the rules change since at least last summer

Bret Bielema, Nick Saban argue hurry-up offenses put players in danger

Alabama and Bielema's former team, Wisconsin, were two of the slowest teams in the nation in terms of offense last season. According to FootballStudyHall.com, which took a look at the tempo of FBS teams from 2008-2012, the Crimson Tide were the slowest team in college football. Alabama ran 2.02 plays per minute of possession.

The Badgers were near the bottom as well, running 2.09 plays per minute of possession....

Alabama's only loss [in 2012] was to Texas A&M, a team the used a no-huddle, up-tempo style of offense. In that game, Crimson Tide defenders were caught several times looking worn-out and out of position.

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-07-25/sports/os-sec-offense-defense-player-safety-0725-20130725_1_bret-bielema-defensive-players-gus-malzahn

Coach Cut is opposed to the proposed rules change

Duke coach David Cutcliffe in a teleconference on Friday also spoke out against the proposed change....

Cutcliffe said he doesn't believe up-tempo offenses cause more injuries. If player safety is the main concern, Cutcliffe said, there are many other potential rule changes that should be considered before taking away a team's competitive edge to play as fast as it pleases.

http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/02/14/3622386/unc-coach-larry-fedora-rips-rules.html#storylink=cpy

Even for Nick Saban this is a pretty blatant attempt to manipulate the rules for competitive advantage

FerryFor50
02-24-2014, 10:57 AM
Update: Bielema is scummier than we imagined...

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-football/news/20140221/bret-bielema-proposed-ncaa-rule-change/?sct=obnetwork

Bielema cited the death of Cal player Ted Agu, as one of his reasons for slowing down the game. He mentions the "sickle cell trait," which was never cited as a factor in Agu's case.


During the booster meeting, Bielema said Agu had sickle cell trait, a genetic condition that renders carriers more susceptible to extreme muscle breakdown during strenuous activity. Cal officials have not commented on whether Agu had sickle cell trait. No cause of death has been released in the case of Agu, who collapsed and died on Feb. 7 during an offseason workout.

So unless Bielema has some inside info, he's making a very dangerous assumption.

Additionally, if you know your player has the sickle cell trait, then maybe you don't let him play? Or play as much?

If Agu did have sickle cell, he died during practice; not during a game. Maybe we should ban practices?

Dev11
02-24-2014, 01:26 PM
Nick Saban and his co-conspirator Bret Bielema have been pushing for the rules change since at least last summer

Bret Bielema, Nick Saban argue hurry-up offenses put players in danger

Alabama and Bielema's former team, Wisconsin, were two of the slowest teams in the nation in terms of offense last season. According to FootballStudyHall.com, which took a look at the tempo of FBS teams from 2008-2012, the Crimson Tide were the slowest team in college football. Alabama ran 2.02 plays per minute of possession.

The Badgers were near the bottom as well, running 2.09 plays per minute of possession....

Alabama's only loss [in 2012] was to Texas A&M, a team the used a no-huddle, up-tempo style of offense. In that game, Crimson Tide defenders were caught several times looking worn-out and out of position.

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-07-25/sports/os-sec-offense-defense-player-safety-0725-20130725_1_bret-bielema-defensive-players-gus-malzahn

Coach Cut is opposed to the proposed rules change

Duke coach David Cutcliffe in a teleconference on Friday also spoke out against the proposed change....

Cutcliffe said he doesn't believe up-tempo offenses cause more injuries. If player safety is the main concern, Cutcliffe said, there are many other potential rule changes that should be considered before taking away a team's competitive edge to play as fast as it pleases.

http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/02/14/3622386/unc-coach-larry-fedora-rips-rules.html#storylink=cpy

Even for Nick Saban this is a pretty blatant attempt to manipulate the rules for competitive advantage

Football is already complicated enough without adding what seems like an arbitrary distinction between quick snaps and regular snaps. Perhaps the NCAA/BCS can invest in research for better protective equipment, or the coaches can devise better conditioning programs for their teams. This rule change feels like stabbing in the dark at the problem, not thinking clearly about it.

Atlanta Duke
02-24-2014, 02:59 PM
This rule change feels like stabbing in the dark at the problem, not thinking clearly about it.

Oh I think Coach Saban is thinking very clearly:)

Because of great recruiting Alabama is two deep with quality players at virtually every position. Not being able to get a tiring first string off the field and replacing those players with a second string of comparable quality reduces that competitive advantage

What amazes me is how this proposal has progressed to the extent it has without most coaches knowing it is on the agenda

nocilla
02-25-2014, 08:42 AM
Oh I think Coach Saban is thinking very clearly:)

Because of great recruiting Alabama is two deep with quality players at virtually every position. Not being able to get a tiring first string off the field and replacing those players with a second string of comparable quality reduces that competitive advantage

What amazes me is how this proposal has progressed to the extent it has without most coaches knowing it is on the agenda

I forget who, maybe Bill King, but someone on the radio said the last 3 Alabama losses have come aginst teams that use the quick snap, up-tempo offense.

roywhite
02-25-2014, 08:54 AM
Oh I think Coach Saban is thinking very clearly:)

Because of great recruiting Alabama is two deep with quality players at virtually every position. Not being able to get a tiring first string off the field and replacing those players with a second string of comparable quality reduces that competitive advantage

What amazes me is how this proposal has progressed to the extent it has without most coaches knowing it is on the agenda


I forget who, maybe Bill King, but someone on the radio said the last 3 Alabama losses have come aginst teams that use the quick snap, up-tempo offense.

Yeah, the Ole Ball Coach calls it the Saban rule (http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/10494833/steve-spurrier-south-carolina-gamecocks-calls-slowdown-proposal-saban-rule); gotta love it; Spurrier still has a sharp needle.


South Carolina's Steve Spurrier added his name to the list of coaches opposed to a rule proposal that would slow down college offenses, and he wasn't afraid to point fingers while criticizing it.

"So, you want to talk about the 'Saban Rule'?" Spurrier told USA Today on Thursday. "That's what I call it. Looks like it's dead now, hopefully."