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View Full Version : Jimmy B at it again



OldPhiKap
02-26-2013, 05:52 AM
Gonna be interesting when he is in the ACC:

http://www.foxsportswisconsin.com/02/25/13/Boeheims-emotions-boil-over-after-close-/msn_landing.html?blockID=869983&feedID=5065

Dr. Rosenrosen
02-26-2013, 05:59 AM
Man, is he bitter or what?

niveklaen
02-26-2013, 06:45 AM
I dont blame him for being bitter. The conference that he has been a part of his whole professional career turned down a sweet deal and then imploded turning him from a BMOC to a refugee - welcomed, respected and acclaimed; but a refugee nonetheless

TruBlu
02-26-2013, 07:23 AM
Sounds like Jimmy has more basketball knowledge in his little finger . . . oh, wait. Another ACC coach has already used that line.

Dr. Rosenrosen
02-26-2013, 07:49 AM
I dont blame him for being bitter. The conference that he has been a part of his whole professional career turned down a sweet deal and then imploded turning him from a BMOC to a refugee - welcomed, respected and acclaimed; but a refugee nonetheless

Oh, I agree 100%. Although being a refugee in the ACC isn't that horrible, is it? Not like they got punished and sent to the BIG Whatever It Is. I just find it a little shocking to see him keep coming unglued. He has the look and sound of a guy who is about to give up. I hope I'm wrong and he doesn't. Would love to see him coach for at least a few years on the ACC.

davekay1971
02-26-2013, 07:57 AM
On the one hand, I get a coach being irritated by some of these questions - when you've done it all and been really successful for nearly 40 years, and you've got some punk who's never even played the game, much less coached it at any level, asking you "should you have" and "why didn't you" questions, it's got to be annoying.

On the other hand, fielding those questions are part of the job of being a coach, and asking those questions is part of the job of being a reporter. It might feel good for the coach to berate the guy who asked the question, but, ultimately, it is a form of bullying. The reporter can't fight back with "yeah, you just lost, your team's on a skid, so maybe you need to take some suggestions because all of us think you were a bonehead for not doing xyz." The coach knows the reporter can't fight back, so he can tee off and he knows it. To me, it just looks ugly and petty when coaches blow up the way Boeheim did.

Cameron
02-26-2013, 08:20 AM
Sounds like Jimmy has more basketball knowledge in his little finger . . . oh, wait. Another ACC coach has already used that line.

When you stop to think of it, if Roy really has tapped into the intellectual power of his pinky, then that is actually very impressive. Based on the evidence we have from many of his more "interesting" interviews, however, the much more likely scenario is that Roy has mistaken his finger for his brain.

Kfanarmy
02-26-2013, 09:22 AM
When you stop to think of it, if Roy really has tapped into the intellectual power of his pinky, then that is actually very impressive. Based on the evidence we have from many of his more "interesting" interviews, however, the much more likely scenario is that Roy has mistaken his finger for his brain.
maybe the coach is a little worn down this season.

oldnavy
02-26-2013, 09:55 AM
On the one hand, I get a coach being irritated by some of these questions - when you've done it all and been really successful for nearly 40 years, and you've got some punk who's never even played the game, much less coached it at any level, asking you "should you have" and "why didn't you" questions, it's got to be annoying.

On the other hand, fielding those questions are part of the job of being a coach, and asking those questions is part of the job of being a reporter. It might feel good for the coach to berate the guy who asked the question, but, ultimately, it is a form of bullying. The reporter can't fight back with "yeah, you just lost, your team's on a skid, so maybe you need to take some suggestions because all of us think you were a bonehead for not doing xyz." The coach knows the reporter can't fight back, so he can tee off and he knows it. To me, it just looks ugly and petty when coaches blow up the way Boeheim did.

I'm with you Dave.

If you really listen to the interviews in general, there is rarely a qood informative exchange. For the most part it is some "canned question" with a "canned" response. "We need to do better on the boards", or "we did a poor job of ______". It is mostly a pointless exercise that says nothing about the game that isn't already obvious.

I understand why the coaches get tired of it, but it is part of the job, and guys like JB, Roy and Coach K are making a ton of money to coach, so as long as that is part of the job description, they all should do it in a professional manner that reflects well upon themselves, their team, and the institution that is paying them buckets of money. For the most part they do, but there are the notable exceptions.

When a reporter asks a dumb question, just give them the usual meaningless answer. In JB's example, he could have said, something along the lines of "we could have done that, but in our (my) experience we/I felt that we had the best players on the court to win, hind sight is 20/20 you know... next question".

Like someone said after the BC game, probably the most interesting thing that came out of the post game interview was the news about Kelly.

moonpie23
02-26-2013, 10:25 AM
"hey coach, what do you think will determine the outcome of the game?"

"uhh, i'd say the score".

.................bum Phillips

jimsumner
02-26-2013, 10:36 AM
Would it be churlish of me to point out that some of these writers have likely been doing this for 37 years and he's telling them how to do their jobs?

oldnavy
02-26-2013, 11:14 AM
Would it be churlish of me to point out that some of these writers have likely been doing this for 37 years and he's telling them how to do their jobs?

AHH, the other side of the coin!

Not at all Jim. I think that no matter who asks the question or how you feel about the question or the reporter, a professional should remain professional.

There are very professional and nice ways to reply and still get the point across that you think it is a silly question without being out right rude and ugly.

I had a boss in the Navy that could tell you that you were a worthless piece of humanity, but make you feel good about it at the same time!! It is a talent few have.

Turtleboy
02-26-2013, 11:29 AM
If they have been doing it for 37 years and are still asking stupid questions perhaps they should reconsider their career choices.

Wander
02-26-2013, 11:48 AM
Some of you guys are being too kind with the "well, I can see things from his perspective" stuff. This isn't complicated, Boeheim was being a complete dbag. He's done this before with reporters, and it's obnoxious and immature; combined with leading the charge for expansion of the NCAA tournament makes him one of my least favorite coaches. I don't think any of the questions were terrible, either.

oldnavy
02-26-2013, 12:04 PM
Some of you guys are being too kind with the "well, I can see things from his perspective" stuff. This isn't complicated, Boeheim was being a complete dbag. He's done this before with reporters, and it's obnoxious and immature; combined with leading the charge for expansion of the NCAA tournament makes him one of my least favorite coaches. I don't think any of the questions were terrible, either.

I understand his frustration, but I do not condone his actions. There is no need to be a jerk and as someone said a bully since the reporters would probably lose their jobs for going back at him.

JB isn't alone in this. Just about every coach has at one time or another been shall we say "less than patient" with the press.

I think most of us can excuse one or three times over a long career, but when it becomes the rule vice the exception then I would think the AD should step in and have a talk with the coach and remind him (or her) that they are employees of the University and are expected to conduct themselves as such.

rsvman
02-26-2013, 12:41 PM
I wonder if there is a more respectful way of asking a coach why he didn't play so-and-so, or why he didn't make a change to slow down so-and-so. It seems that no matter how you ask it, you're essentially second-guessing the coaching decision, which could be construed as an insult, particularly to a man who has coached as long and as well as Boeheim has.

And I guess one would be more inclined to hear these questions as personal insults when one has just lost a game (or two). Questions about game management are easier to tolerate when one has succeeded. Coach K heard plenty of questions about why he asked Zoubek to purposely miss the second free throw; imagine how much more difficult it would've been to field those questions had Butler's last-second shot gone in.

jimsumner
02-26-2013, 01:40 PM
Mike Krzyzewski isn't exactly Mr. Sunshine after a loss. Nor should he be. You don't get to this level without a strong ego and a major competitive streak. Losing is no fun and having to talk about it in public a few minutes later sure isn't fun.

And Krzyzewski has a way of letting folks know that he's not impressed by a question; it's called "Getting K'd."

But I cannot imagine him called a reporter or anyone else an "idiot" in a public forum. Most coaches learn how to manage a room, develop a thick skin and respect the fact that writers have deadlines, editors and a readership that wants to know why fill-in-the-blank-isn't playing more. So, why not view a question like that as an opportunity to educate those readers? Krzyzewski was asked those kinds of questions about Alex Murphy earlier in the season and answered them all with patience and respect because he knew that people wanted to know.

Jim Boeheim is getting paid a boatload of money to coach a game. A lot more than the guy/gal with the office down the road who's trying to find a cure for cancer.

I know, I know, 20,000 people don't pay to fill an arena to watch lab work.

But still.

Part of any coach's job description involves meeting with the press, the latter acting as an intermediary between the coach and the fans who help make sure he keeps making a boatload of money. He knew that going in.

So, having seen much better examples of post-game decorum by coaches who have suffered more-disappointing losses, my sympathy for Boeheim goes only so far.

FerryFor50
02-26-2013, 01:48 PM
In a fantasy world...

Boeheim: "Any more coaches here? Want to ask another coaching question? I'd be happy to take it. I've only been doing this 37 years, I'm sure you've got more ideas of who we should play or we shouldn't play or who should lead? What do I know?"

Me (in my last question as a reporter before I am fired): "Coach, if you were so smart, wouldn't you have won the game?"

alteran
02-26-2013, 01:58 PM
On the one hand, I get a coach being irritated by some of these questions - when you've done it all and been really successful for nearly 40 years, and you've got some punk who's never even played the game, much less coached it at any level, asking you "should you have" and "why didn't you" questions, it's got to be annoying.

On the other hand, fielding those questions are part of the job of being a coach, and asking those questions is part of the job of being a reporter. It might feel good for the coach to berate the guy who asked the question, but, ultimately, it is a form of bullying. The reporter can't fight back with "yeah, you just lost, your team's on a skid, so maybe you need to take some suggestions because all of us think you were a bonehead for not doing xyz." The coach knows the reporter can't fight back, so he can tee off and he knows it. To me, it just looks ugly and petty when coaches blow up the way Boeheim did.

Agreed.

This attitude from coaches about "dumb questions from reporters" always annoys me because the coaches make the erroneous assumption that the reporters are always asking question for themselves. But no, they're asking the questions for THEIR READERS. Readers who don't know anywhere near as much as bball coaches and reporters. Probably a lot of reporters know the answers. Coaches should really know better.

This is like people who yell at clerks at a register because a chain store has a bad policy.

When reporters wants to spout off on a topic, they write editorials. If they're writing articles, than they have to report what the coaches say. And the only way to get the coaches to talk on the potentially foolish topics fans talk about is to ask the foolish questions.

jimsumner
02-26-2013, 02:15 PM
In a fantasy world...

Boeheim: "Any more coaches here? Want to ask another coaching question? I'd be happy to take it. I've only been doing this 37 years, I'm sure you've got more ideas of who we should play or we shouldn't play or who should lead? What do I know?"

Me (in my last question as a reporter before I am fired): "Coach, if you were so smart, wouldn't you have won the game?"

Another fantasy alternative.

"Coach, I've also been doing this a long time. I make a fraction of what you make, my daughter needs braces, I have a tight deadline, my newspaper is cutting back and my editor told me if I didn't ask you that last question, he'd find someone who would. And I really need that health insurance."