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NYC Duke Fan
06-26-2007, 04:40 AM
In Seth Davis' article in SI, he says that it is unlikely that Monroe would stay for more than 2 years and most likely will be a one and done player.

In my mind 2 years would be OK, but knowing, and I realize that it is difficult to ascertain from the get go, ( see Luol Deng ), that Monroe would be at Duke for only one year, would you recruit him ?

mpj96
06-26-2007, 06:58 AM
Having read Seth Davis's article I would make him my number one recruiting priority. He is a great kid from a great family with tremendous discipline and heart. He is a phenomenal all around player with great skills and great natural athleticism. He knows our program, respects it and grew up a fan.

It doesn't matter if it is one year, two years or four years, time spent watching a kid like that play and grow as a player is always going to seem too short.

jaimedun34
06-26-2007, 09:27 AM
Absolutely. We didn't have a lot of healthy talent to make up for the loss of Deng. You know your post rotation is bad when you are counting on Reggie Love, Patrick Johnson and Lee Melchionni to defend ACC calibur post players.

In Monroe's case, he could be the talent that puts us over the top, like a Marvin Williams for UNC. Also, when he leaves we should still have Zoubek, Thomas, Singler and King to fill in the rotation in addition to recruits from the '09 class.

MrBisonDevil
06-26-2007, 10:09 AM
GM seems like a good kid for Duke, regardless if he's one-and-done. We know college recruiting has changed and no college team keeps 5-star talent longer than a couple yrs (if that). So, if that 5-star talent fits well within the Duke family, then I'm his/her biggest fan!

Clipsfan
06-26-2007, 11:33 AM
Having read Seth Davis's article I would make him my number one recruiting priority. He is a great kid from a great family with tremendous discipline and heart. He is a phenomenal all around player with great skills and great natural athleticism. He knows our program, respects it and grew up a fan.

It doesn't matter if it is one year, two years or four years, time spent watching a kid like that play and grow as a player is always going to seem too short.

I agree fully, and I think that K does as well, as Greg is supposedly our number one recruiting priority.

mgtr
06-26-2007, 11:41 AM
I guess I have to agree with the sentiments posted in this thread, but it is tough for me to accept. Whatever happened to the idea of a kid going to school to get an education? I guess the answer is that a great majority of young people go to college primarily to get a better job (=$$$). The money in the NBA is just too great a temptation to wait four years, with the possibility of career-ending injury. If you are going to college to make more money, why wait?
Has anybody done a study about the performance of NBA players by zero, one, two, etc. years of college? There are obviously individuals like Kobe and LeBron who screw up the results, but it would be an interesting study to see.

Clipsfan
06-26-2007, 11:45 AM
I guess I have to agree with the sentiments posted in this thread, but it is tough for me to accept. Whatever happened to the idea of a kid going to school to get an education? I guess the answer is that a great majority of young people go to college primarily to get a better job (=$$$). The money in the NBA is just too great a temptation to wait four years, with the possibility of career-ending injury. If you are going to college to make more money, why wait?
Has anybody done a study about the performance of NBA players by zero, one, two, etc. years of college? There are obviously individuals like Kobe and LeBron who screw up the results, but it would be an interesting study to see.

I would assume that the study would be fairly skewed based on the idea that the best players leave earlier for the NBA. It doesn't always work out for them, but if you took the entire group of 4 year basketball players, the study would suggest that staying 4 years is an awful idea, as the majority of them do not play in the pros. If you only limited to those who did make it into the NBA, the story would be be different; however, the study would have to only cover the last 15 or so years at most, and the recent trends towards jumping early would definitely skew it towards early entrants doing better. I would guess that Europeans would also throw it off quite a bit, as many of them don't attend college but start playing as pros in Europe in their mid-late teens.

MrBisonDevil
06-26-2007, 01:03 PM
I believe the majority of people go to school to get into X profession. A former classmate at Duke MBA received a full-time VP position offer during her summer internship. She accepted and never came back to Duke MBA for her 2nd year. Duke served its purpose for her. I was miffed that someone would leave a good MBA program without that sheepskin, but after thinking about it, the VP position was her goal all along. It just happened 1 yr earlier than most MBA students.

I now see the 1-and-done basketball kids in the same light as my old classmate. The goal is the NBA... college can only increase your value. But when your value peaks (lottery pick like Brand & Deng), itís probably best to take the leap.

I donít like it but I fully understand and accept thatís the way things are going to be for the foreseeable future.

Clipsfan
06-26-2007, 01:21 PM
I believe the majority of people go to school to get into X profession. A former classmate at Duke MBA received a full-time VP position offer during her summer internship. She accepted and never came back to Duke MBA for her 2nd year. Duke served its purpose for her. I was miffed that someone would leave a good MBA program without that sheepskin, but after thinking about it, the VP position was her goal all along. It just happened 1 yr earlier than most MBA students.

I now see the 1-and-done basketball kids in the same light as my old classmate. The goal is the NBA... college can only increase your value. But when your value peaks (lottery pick like Brand & Deng), itís probably best to take the leap.

I donít like it but I fully understand and accept thatís the way things are going to be for the foreseeable future.

I agree with you that the purpose of school is to prepare you for the job afterwards, and in the case of the best basketball players the value is in the competition on the court, not in the diploma. I do think that there is additional value to the experience, but the risk of injury and the family need for the money can easily override that. It's also true that there is a very limited period over which even the best conditioned athletes can perform, and making money during those years appeals to many. As for the MBA, I was asked if I'd start working full-time after my summer internship, but said that I wanted to finish school. This was two-fold, as I enjoyed the school experience and I also know that the diploma will be meaningful down the road. I will not make enough at my current job to quit working afterwards, unfortunately. However, a classmate of mine chose to take a full-time job, although he did take enough evening classes to still get his degree.

abrhodes
06-26-2007, 02:28 PM
This isn't too far off subject, but I started a facebook group about a month ago for Greg to come to Duke, so anyone with an account is more than welcome to join. :)