PDA

View Full Version : Leaving Early for the NBA



I_am_a_Blue_Devil
02-09-2010, 08:31 AM
So many kids leave early to go to the pros, and it seems like the percentages of kids that become stars like they are hoping versus ones that just don't really pan out, are greatly in favor of not working out. Its hard for me to look at Gerald Henderson's production thus far in the NBA and think that we wouldnt be enjoying himself much more with Duke this year.

In the last 5 games for example, he is averaging 0.5 ppg, he is 1-2 from the field, and committed 1 t/o. And that is misleading, because 3 out of the 5 games dont count because he didnt play (Coaches decision).

http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/players/profile?playerId=3993

Some kids go early because they need the money for their family. Some kids go early because they are told that its the right move right now. Im not a supporter of kids being able to leave early, however, i do understand that if a guy was a computer prodigy and Apple wanted him to leave school early and take a high-paying job with them, no one, including myself would have a problem with that.

I guess i just see it through my blue-tinted glasses and think, man i wish they would have stayed for this reason or that, but mainly because so many kids go early, and kill their chances to develop because they are riding the pine on the league. I wish someone could come up with a better method or give some of these guys better advice on what their chances of being a good NBA player will be.

superdave
02-09-2010, 08:53 AM
College basketball is a means to an end; to prepare a player to be a pro. As a big college fan and a more casual pro fan, sometimes it's hard for me to understand the mindset of a kid ho grew up dreaming of the NBA. But the NBA is the goal.

And getting drafted in the lottery is almost impossible to turn down.

Channing
02-09-2010, 08:55 AM
if its about development, these guys are going to develop far quicker in the NBA where they go up against elite competition everyday, and all they do is eat, sleep, and breathe basketball. Just because a kid gets a DNPCD doesnt mean that he isnt developing as a player.

Whether he would enjoy himself more at Duke - I dont know, being 22 years old and a millionaire is pretty hard to top.

SupaDave
02-09-2010, 08:56 AM
You can sit in class for free or sit on the bench and make millions. It's all a matter of perspective and most like the million dollar one just a little better...

allenmurray
02-09-2010, 09:26 AM
So many kids leave early to go to the pros, and it seems like the percentages of kids that become stars like they are hoping versus ones that just don't really pan out, are greatly in favor of not working out. Its hard for me to look at Gerald Henderson's production thus far in the NBA and think that we wouldnt be enjoying himself much more with Duke this year.

In the last 5 games for example, he is averaging 0.5 ppg, he is 1-2 from the field, and committed 1 t/o. And that is misleading, because 3 out of the 5 games dont count because he didnt play (Coaches decision).

http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/players/profile?playerId=3993

Some kids go early because they need the money for their family. Some kids go early because they are told that its the right move right now. Im not a supporter of kids being able to leave early, however, i do understand that if a guy was a computer prodigy and Apple wanted him to leave school early and take a high-paying job with them, no one, including myself would have a problem with that.

I guess i just see it through my blue-tinted glasses and think, man i wish they would have stayed for this reason or that, but mainly because so many kids go early, and kill their chances to develop because they are riding the pine on the league. I wish someone could come up with a better method or give some of these guys better advice on what their chances of being a good NBA player will be.

There are not that many "stars" to begin with. Each team has 2 or 3 superstars, and maybe 3 -4 really good players. The remaining 7 or 8 are role players (meaning half the folks in the NBA will never be "stars"). Good college players know this and see the NBA as a career, not as the place to be the next MJ or Kobe or LeBron. If they get drafted n the first round they are set. Even if they get drafted in the second round,and stick for 2+ years (see Randolph, Shavlik) they are set. They have met a life-goal. I hate seeing my favorite players leave early because I love to watch them (and I watch a lot more college ball than NBA). Nevertheless I understand why they do. If you know you are going to be a first round pick (say, maybe #18) I'm not sure it makes sense to come back to college in hopes of maybe being #14 the next year.

jimsumner
02-09-2010, 11:56 AM
It should be noted that Gerald Henderson is playing for a coach who historically is loathe to place much trust in rookies.

jv001
02-09-2010, 12:00 PM
It should be noted that Gerald Henderson is playing for a coach who historically is loathe to place much trust in rookies.

Right Jim and a unc alum as well. Go Duke!

RPS
02-09-2010, 12:43 PM
It should be noted that Gerald Henderson is playing for a coach who historically is loathe to place much trust in rookies.Yup. Larry hates to play young players -- it was probably the worst possible spot for G. Even in New Jersey, bad as that would be, he'd likely get regular minutes.

That said, since first round picks get guaranteed money and since salaries are capped for three years, a prospective first round pick -- from a financial perspective at least -- is almost always smart to go pro. Theoretically, a player could stay and improve his status and draft position, but he could also get injured. Moreover, players tend to drop rather than rise in desirability over time -- perceived "upside" is usually higher than actual production I guess (think Kyle).

I'd love for players to stay in school longer for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that the pro game would improve. But I'm opposed to any efforts to restrict players' freedom from making what they believe to be the best decision for themselves and their families.

Devilsfan
02-09-2010, 12:47 PM
The good news is that historically he has his bags packed ready to move on as soon as he arrives for a new gig.

BlueDevilCorvette!
02-09-2010, 12:59 PM
You can sit in class for free or sit on the bench and make millions. It's all a matter of perspective and most like the million dollar one just a little better...

Ah, I'll take the sit on the bench and make millions Alex...

Jeffrey
02-09-2010, 01:13 PM
McRoberts probably would have made more money in the NBA if he never went to college.

Saratoga2
02-09-2010, 01:31 PM
He stayed 4 years, was a big college star and yet still got little PT going pro. Either you have what will work in the NBA or you don't. Henderson should get better as he becomes accustomed to the life.

strawbs
02-09-2010, 03:24 PM
I have a lot of thoughts on this subject.

With G, I wish he would have stayed one more year but it was probably the right decision to leave. He could have stayed 1 more year and worked on his jumper and ball handling and potentially been a lottery pick after his senior year (guys stock usually drops the longer they stay though, because you can pretty much tell any limitations they will have in the nba). Or he could leave because he knew he'd be a lottery pick and work on the tools he needs to be a successful player in the league, WHILE GETTING PAID. I don't blame him one bit for leaving. But sitting on the end of the bench isn't probably what he imagined either.

As for guys in college now (specifically guys on our team: kyle, nolan) I think if they believe they have any chance of being a lottery pick or even just a first rounder it would be in their best interest to leave this year. With the nba facing an inevitable lockout after next season, it could cost them a ton of money to come back for another year. Who knows what contracts will look at after the next CBA but you'd have to imagine players will end up taking some sort of salary hit.
I don't think nolan is projected as a 1st round pick, i don't even know if he's even thinking about leaving, but with kyle it would probably benefit him to leave after this season (even though it's obvious he's not quite ready).

Personally i think the nba should use the same system that MLB uses. Either let kids enter the draft out of high school or make them stay in school 3 years. That way students have to work toward a degree of some sort. It would eliminate John Wall (Im assuming he's gone after this season) situations where a guy comes in for 1 year and has no incentives to stay in class after the season is over.

JaMarcus Russell
02-09-2010, 05:53 PM
I have a lot of thoughts on this subject.

As for guys in college now (specifically guys on our team: kyle, nolan) I think if they believe they have any chance of being a lottery pick or even just a first rounder it would be in their best interest to leave this year. W

I agree with most of your thoughts. However, I think guys should only leave if they have a reasonable chance at being picked in the first round. If you look at their prospects on ESPN, Nolan is at 129 which pretty much rules him out for this year. Both NBA Draft.net and Draft Express agree by putting him in the second round in 2011.

As for Singler, it's a little bit closer but he should also return despite the salary changes looming after the 2010-11 season. Singler is rated 63rd on ESPN, while rated as the top pick of the second round in this year's draft on NBA Draft.net while being the top second rounder in 2011 on Draft Express.

-bdbd
02-09-2010, 06:28 PM
It should be noted that Gerald Henderson is playing for a coach who historically is loathe to place much trust in rookies.

Especially DUKE rookies!!


My friends in Charlotte commonly refer to them as the TAR-cats.
Oddly, I don't recall Felton and May having so much trouble getting into games as rookies there...

CDu
02-09-2010, 07:20 PM
Especially DUKE rookies!!


My friends in Charlotte commonly refer to them as the TAR-cats.
Oddly, I don't recall Felton and May having so much trouble getting into games as rookies there...

Henderson's lack of playing time has nothing to do with his being a former Duke player. It is instead because he has a SF game in a SG body and so he's learning how to play SG in the NBA. Additionally, he's currently behind two very good players at the wings (Steven Jackson and Gerald Wallace).

The Bobcats knew he was a bit of a project given his lack of ballhandling skills and inconsistent jumpshot. That's being evidenced by his 35% FG shooting and 29% 3pt shooting.

MChambers
02-09-2010, 07:45 PM
I'd love for players to stay in school longer for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that the pro game would improve. But I'm opposed to any efforts to restrict players' freedom from making what they believe to be the best decision for themselves and their families.

I completely agree with this, but the &^%$&(*P) rookie salary cap has the peverse effect of encouraging players to go pro as soon as possible, because the sooner they go pro, the sooner they are out from under the cap.

moonpie23
02-09-2010, 08:39 PM
gerald henderson - 09-10

$1,957,080.00

jimsumner
02-09-2010, 09:59 PM
"Oddly, I don't recall Felton and May having so much trouble getting into games as rookies there... "

Oddly, I don't recall Larry Brown being Charlotte's head coach in 2006.

The idea that Charlotte would deliberately draft a former Duke player in the first round only to not play him simply because he went to Duke goes beyond paranoid. If the Bobcats braintrust was that anti-Duke, then why pick Henderson at all?

Dawun
02-09-2010, 10:55 PM
There are not that many "stars" to begin with. Each team has 2 or 3 superstars, and maybe 3 -4 really good players. The remaining 7 or 8 are role players (meaning half the folks in the NBA will never be "stars"). Good college players know this and see the NBA as a career, not as the place to be the next MJ or Kobe or LeBron. If they get drafted n the first round they are set. Even if they get drafted in the second round,and stick for 2+ years (see Randolph, Shavlik) they are set. They have met a life-goal. I hate seeing my favorite players leave early because I love to watch them (and I watch a lot more college ball than NBA). Nevertheless I understand why they do. If you know you are going to be a first round pick (say, maybe #18) I'm not sure it makes sense to come back to college in hopes of maybe being #14 the next year.

You paint a prettier picture of the NBA than most fans. There aren't that many superstars in the league. Let's say Kobe or LeBron is a prototypical "superstar". Each team has maybe 1 of those guys, then if they are lucky, they have 2 stars, and the rest are role players.

The goal is to get to the NBA. G probably wanted to play in the NBA since he was a kid. I watch a lot of the NBA and college ball, and the game is too different. The NBA is tougher, the players are vastly superior, and the schedule is grinding. The best way to prepare for the NBA is to be in the NBA. G has a good head on his shoulders, so I'm confident he will figure out how to earn minutes. JJ worked his butt off, and now he is a regular rotation/sometimes starter on a legit championship caliber team. Actually, I think JJ serves as the perfect example of why it makes more sense to leave early if you can. As much as he dominated the college ranks, he needed about 2-3 years to become a decent NBA player. the NBA is much tougher league to master. I'd say the college atmosphere is vastly superior to the NBA, but the game itself is a higher grade in the Pros.

strawbs
02-09-2010, 11:00 PM
The idea that Charlotte would deliberately draft a former Duke player in the first round only to not play him simply because he went to Duke goes beyond paranoid. If the Bobcats braintrust was that anti-Duke, then why pick Henderson at all?

Jordan lost a bet?

Dawun
02-09-2010, 11:00 PM
BTW, JJ is a better player than G in almost every facet of the game, and it took him a few years to adjust. Very few players go to league and dominate early on (Shaq, Jordan, LeBron, Durant to name a few). Most players take 2-3 years, and for a rookie who plays for a coach that does not play rookies, it might take an additional year or two. G will propser. He won't become Kobe, but he's good enough to earn quality minutes (maybe starter minutes) on a contender.

MChambers
02-10-2010, 08:19 AM
If the Bobcats braintrust was that anti-Duke, then why pick Henderson at all?

To capture him and torture him, of course!

dukeimac
02-10-2010, 08:46 AM
If you are an underclassman the only two reason you should go pro and that is if you are in the lottery, guaranteed or you can't handle the classes.

Most players jump to the pros because they either have bottom feeders telling them they are good enough and all they can see is the green or they can't cut it is school. Those who can't cut it in college can't cut it in the pros but they can't admit it.

McRoberts came to Duke soft and left soft, no way he makes it in the pros, even by bye passing Duke. You see it all the time, high school is soft compared to the college game and the college game is soft compared to the pros. If you can't make it in college you can't make it in the pros.

Best example is Czyz. People on this site just raved about his athletic ability, playing above the rim and how good he was going to be at Duke. The problem is the YouTube was all about his game at the high school level and in those clips he is the most athletic guy on the court and the high school game is pretty simple, he stood out. But at Duke he was about an average athletic guy and the game was much faster and more thinking is needed, which really challenges most guys.

Watching McRoberts and Shav at Duke, these guys came in soft and couldn't step up to the college game in physical or intelligence level and they have no chance in the pros. People thought they had potential and that is why they are giving them a chance but the light is dimming every day.

Guys like LeBron would toast McRoberts and Shav in a game of one on one to the tune of about 100 to 20.

theAlaskanBear
02-10-2010, 09:09 AM
Gerald isn't getting PT as someone said earlier for a couple of reasons, the number one issue being the depth chart. Stephen Jackson and Gerald Wallace are both borderline all-star players, and the two best players on the Bobcats.

Also, Larry Brown is much like Coach K in that young players have to EARN their time on the court, and a big focus is placed upon defense.

I like to mock the Bobcats mercilessly due to the good ol' Boy network of Carolina alum, but they view it as within their best interest to draft players out of Carolina that they think will make in the NBA, because there is already name recognition and emotional attachment to these players among the fanbase. Its a business move, one that has backfired at times (Sean May).

Gerald will eventually be a good NBA player, and as someone said, he would probably get more time on a different team. But this is still an opportunity for him to eat, sleep, and drink basketball from a legendary coach and this bench time will mature him intellectually and emotionally.

Jeffrey
02-10-2010, 09:55 AM
McRoberts came to Duke soft and left soft, no way he makes it in the pros, even by bye passing Duke. You see it all the time, high school is soft compared to the college game and the college game is soft compared to the pros. If you can't make it in college you can't make it in the pros.

IMO, this is one of the reasons why a very highly ranked high school player is sometimes better off going straight to the NBA, being a lottery pick, and getting as much money in their 1st contract as possible. Of course, risk of serious injury is another.

flyingdutchdevil
02-10-2010, 10:12 AM
IMO, this is one of the reasons why a very highly ranked high school player is sometimes better off going straight to the NBA, being a lottery pick, and getting as much money in their 1st contract as possible. Of course, risk of serious injury is another.

Ironically, McBob was part of the last year that a high schooler could jump straight to the NBA.

I'm not saying McBob coming to Duke was a mistake, but he certainly would have been a lot richer had he gone straight to the NBA and been a lottery / first round pick.

allenmurray
02-10-2010, 10:12 AM
If you are an underclassman the only two reason you should go pro and that is if you are in the lottery, guaranteed or you can't handle the classes.

Most players jump to the pros because they either have bottom feeders telling them they are good enough and all they can see is the green or they can't cut it is school. Those who can't cut it in college can't cut it in the pros but they can't admit it.

McRoberts came to Duke soft and left soft, no way he makes it in the pros, even by bye passing Duke. You see it all the time, high school is soft compared to the college game and the college game is soft compared to the pros. If you can't make it in college you can't make it in the pros.

Watching McRoberts and Shav at Duke, these guys came in soft and couldn't step up to the college game in physical or intelligence level and they have no chance in the pros. People thought they had potential and that is why they are giving them a chance but the light is dimming every day.

The facts do not back up your argument.

Since leaving school Shavlik Randolph has earned over 4 million dollars. If he had stayed at Duke another year, earned his degree, and not gone into the NBA what career would have paid him an average salary of $800k a year? If he had stayed at Duke one more year he still would have been behind Shelden Williams and Josh McRoberts in the rotation and probably would not have increased his draft potential one bit. Contrary to popular opinion it seems to me he actually made a good decision. McRoberts now earns over $750k a year. Again, other than professional basketball what career might he have been preparing himself for in his studies that would pay that kind of salary to someone who has yet to celebrate his 22nd birthday?

Perhaps Shav didn't become quite the Duke player some would have liked, but for him basketball is a job, not a way to be entertained on weeknights in front of a television as it is for you and me. I'm not sure what you do for a living, or how much money you make, but Shavlik Randolph has made 4 million dollars in five years doing something he loves. I'd hardly describe that as a failure experience, nor do I see how he would have done much better for himself by staying at Duke.

Personally I would like to see players like Randolph and McRoberts stay (as well as players like Brand, Henderson, etc.). But when they came to Duke it was with the intention of becoming a professional basketball player. Perhaps they didn't achieve that goal with the glamour and accolades they wanted. But less than 500 people make their living playing basketball in the NBA. They joined a club with less than 500 members and are becoming millionires in the process.

SupaDave
02-10-2010, 01:27 PM
The facts do not back up your argument.

Since leaving school Shavlik Randolph has earned over 4 million dollars. If he had stayed at Duke another year, earned his degree, and not gone into the NBA what career would have paid him an average salary of $800k a year? If he had stayed at Duke one more year he still would have been behind Shelden Williams and Josh McRoberts in the rotation and probably would not have increased his draft potential one bit. Contrary to popular opinion it seems to me he actually made a good decision. McRoberts now earns over $750k a year. Again, other than professional basketball what career might he have been preparing himself for in his studies that would pay that kind of salary to someone who has yet to celebrate his 22nd birthday?

Perhaps Shav didn't become quite the Duke player some would have liked, but for him basketball is a job, not a way to be entertained on weeknights in front of a television as it is for you and me. I'm not sure what you do for a living, or how much money you make, but Shavlik Randolph has made 4 million dollars in five years doing something he loves. I'd hardly describe that as a failure experience, nor do I see how he would have done much better for himself by staying at Duke.

Personally I would like to see players like Randolph and McRoberts stay (as well as players like Brand, Henderson, etc.). But when they came to Duke it was with the intention of becoming a professional basketball player. Perhaps they didn't achieve that goal with the glamour and accolades they wanted. But less than 500 people make their living playing basketball in the NBA. They joined a club with less than 500 members and are becoming millionires in the process.

Well stated. Just getting in the NBA's DOOR is an achievement and if you're lucky enough you better RUN through. Can you say GUARANTEED? There's a lot of folks in the NBDL WISHING for McBob's and Shavlik's kinda "failure"...

Don't know how hard it is? Just take a look at Rafer Alston's career.

BD80
02-10-2010, 01:47 PM
I think Gerald ended up in a pretty sweet situation.

He gets to live in Charlotte, there are many worse places to play and live during the winter. During the summer, he go to the Bobcats' facility to work on his game every day, and still attend summer classes at Duke and visit with Coach K and the team.

Larry Brown is an a$s, but he is also a great teacher. G gets to filter those lessons through Coach K whenever he wants.

And a guaranteed annual salary of $2 mil.

Jaymf7
02-10-2010, 01:53 PM
[QUOTE=SupaDave;361981]Well stated. Just getting in the NBA's DOOR is an achievement and if you're lucky enough you better RUN through. Can you say GUARANTEED? There's a lot of folks in the NBDL WISHING for McBob's and Shavlik's kinda "failure"...
QUOTE]

To be clear, neither Josh nor Shav got any guaranteed money after the draft. Josh was arguably lucky to have a connection with Oden, his AAU teammate, who potentially put in a good word for him after being drafted 1st overall by the Blazers (not that that worked out). Shav was undrafted but managed to catch on with Philly (run by Billy King at the time, right?). Again, a fortunate connection. He surprised some with hustle and got a contract, but was recently cut by the Heat.

These guys had no guarantees, but connections, upside, and hustle got them some opportunities. Not sure you want to run to that kind of challenge, particularly if you could increase your stock by staying, improving and being featured on a team like Duke. Of couse, it is different if you are a lottery pick.

In Kyle's case, it looks like he would be a low pick this year, possibly getting into the first round and very low guaranteed money. Likely better for him to stick around and build some brand on a loaded team. If he gets into the lottery his rookie scale contract will be worth millions more.

OldSchool
02-10-2010, 01:55 PM
To back up what allenmurray and Supadave have said, the teams that Shav has been with, Philadelphia, Portland and Miami, all described him essentially as the consummate basketball professional.

He had worked himself into the regular rotation at Philly before a freakish injury that would have ended the career of many other players. He was not as talented as a lot of other players (and it is unfair to compare any forward to LeBron, who is a freak of nature) but he is not "soft."

dukeimac
02-10-2010, 02:57 PM
The facts do not back up your argument.

Since leaving school Shavlik Randolph has earned over 4 million dollars. If he had stayed at Duke another year, earned his degree, and not gone into the NBA what career would have paid him an average salary of $800k a year? If he had stayed at Duke one more year he still would have been behind Shelden Williams and Josh McRoberts in the rotation and probably would not have increased his draft potential one bit. Contrary to popular opinion it seems to me he actually made a good decision. McRoberts now earns over $750k a year. Again, other than professional basketball what career might he have been preparing himself for in his studies that would pay that kind of salary to someone who has yet to celebrate his 22nd birthday?

Perhaps Shav didn't become quite the Duke player some would have liked, but for him basketball is a job, not a way to be entertained on weeknights in front of a television as it is for you and me. I'm not sure what you do for a living, or how much money you make, but Shavlik Randolph has made 4 million dollars in five years doing something he loves. I'd hardly describe that as a failure experience, nor do I see how he would have done much better for himself by staying at Duke.

Personally I would like to see players like Randolph and McRoberts stay (as well as players like Brand, Henderson, etc.). But when they came to Duke it was with the intention of becoming a professional basketball player. Perhaps they didn't achieve that goal with the glamour and accolades they wanted. But less than 500 people make their living playing basketball in the NBA. They joined a club with less than 500 members and are becoming millionires in the process.

Had Shav and McRoberts stayed at Duke and actually learned to play tough they would have had better opportunities in the NBA.

I didn't say they should get a degree and not go to the NBA.

For most of those who leave the college game early, they never learned the college game and that makes the pro game much more difficult for them.

Shav may have made 4 million bucks but he ain't going to make much more. When he came to the college game everyone would have thought he would have made a heck of a lot more than that in the pros. But he cut his pro earnings drastically because he didn't learn the college game and hasn't come close to learning the pro game. I think his light is out.

There are many of pros who made a lot more than 4 million and within 3 years removed from the game went broke. I may not make 4 million in my life time but I'll live real comfortable when I retire.

SupaDave
02-10-2010, 03:05 PM
Had Shav and McRoberts stayed at Duke and actually learned to play tough they would have had better opportunities in the NBA.

I didn't say they should get a degree and not go to the NBA.

For most of those who leave the college game early, they never learned the college game and that makes the pro game much more difficult for them.

Shav may have made 4 million bucks but he ain't going to make much more. When he came to the college game everyone would have thought he would have made a heck of a lot more than that in the pros. But he cut his pro earnings drastically because he didn't learn the college game and hasn't come close to learning the pro game. I think his light is out.

There are many of pros who made a lot more than 4 million and within 3 years removed from the game went broke. I may not make 4 million in my life time but I'll live real comfortable when I retire.

First - college does NOT teach you how to play tough. That really doesn't make sense.

Second - broke in NBA terms is actually living like a regular person. It's still quite comfortable.

Three years at Duke and you think someone didn't learn the college game? Wow...

So many holes here...

Dawun
02-10-2010, 03:09 PM
Had Shav and McRoberts stayed at Duke and actually learned to play tough they would have had better opportunities in the NBA.

I didn't say they should get a degree and not go to the NBA.

For most of those who leave the college game early, they never learned the college game and that makes the pro game much more difficult for them.

Shav may have made 4 million bucks but he ain't going to make much more. When he came to the college game everyone would have thought he would have made a heck of a lot more than that in the pros. But he cut his pro earnings drastically because he didn't learn the college game and hasn't come close to learning the pro game. I think his light is out.

There are many of pros who made a lot more than 4 million and within 3 years removed from the game went broke. I may not make 4 million in my life time but I'll live real comfortable when I retire.

Honestly, I don't think you can "learn" how to play NBA tough on the college level. The competition is much more ferocious, the players are bigger, and the game seems faster. Perhaps, you can fine tune your offensive skills (maybe), or you can be more aggressive. But, it's not the same game. The most effective way to improve is by playing in the league. I don't think Shav would have benefited with another year. McBob needed a PG. Paulus did not cut it. If he was around with say Irving, then staying one more year probably could have benefited him. It would have been more of the same if he stayed an extra year.

Billy Dat
02-10-2010, 03:18 PM
-Shav
The kid's Duke career was snakebit by injury. I think most everyone thought he was crazy to leave and amazed and impressed that he stuck in the NBA as long as he did. Connections may have helped a little, which is part of the appeal of Duke as a program, but he earned his place. I am sure he'll be able to add to that $4MM overseas if he wants. An extra year would not have helped him at all, unless he miraculously broke out as a superstar.

-McRoberts
As others have mentioned, this is a case where he should have left Duke after his freshman year when he was projected as a lottery pick. I think he may have had a hard time going out of high school because of that back injury and subsequent surgery.

The value of "learning the college game" really boils down to learning how to play defense and other basic fundamentals that are not well taught in high school. Aside from that, especially on offense, "learning the college game" can be limiting. Did anyone think that BC's Jared Dudley would be making his living as a 3-point shooter in the NBA when he spent his college career anchored in the post as part of Al Skinner's Flex? Often, guys are forced to play out of their potential NBA position because of the lack of quality big men in college (e.g. Singler his first 2 years).

I am not sure what your statement about NBA players going broke refers to, but I am guessing that going pro early isn't the X-factor in that equation.

Matches
02-10-2010, 03:38 PM
As others have pointed out, the mistake McR made wasn't leaving too early. If anything he stayed a year too long. The light is not "dimming" for him - he was actually starting for a little while for the Pacers this year while they had injuries. He's now been in the league for three years and probably will hang around at least awhile longer, and if that doesn't work out he can make a mint playing overseas.

Shav is a marginal NBA player but he's now been in the league for 5 years. Lots of guys flame out much sooner than that.

Perhaps either or both of those guys could have improved their draft status by returning for another year, perhaps not. They also could have blown out their knees and never played again. It's always easy to pontificate about the business and career decisions of others when one's own money isn't at stake. If someone had offered me a high-paying job after a few years of college, with no guarantees that it would still be there after I graduated, I would've taken it. I think most people would.