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BobbyFan
08-17-2009, 03:50 PM
Christian Laettner turned 40 today.

Tom B.
08-17-2009, 04:07 PM
Christian Laettner turned 40 today.




Raise you.

Many of the freshmen who will start at Duke this are younger than Duke's first men's basketball national championship.

Turk
08-17-2009, 05:10 PM
Well, phphpbbbtphbbttt!!!!! (I'm older than Christian - and yes, some days I DO feel old.) "Why don't you give me a nice paper cut and pour lemon juice on it?!?"

That was a pretty big geezer milestone for me several years back - when I figured out that there wasn't a Duke undergrad who had been born at the time I graduated. :eek: Heads up to all you young'uns - it comes faster than you think!! :eek:

Oh, by the way, Happy Birthday, Christian!!!

roywhite
08-17-2009, 06:30 PM
Raise you.

Many of the freshmen who will start at Duke this are younger than Duke's first men's basketball national championship.

And see your raise...

I was on campus at Duke last year when the freshmen were moving in, and now the moms are starting to look kinda young to me. :)

rthomas
08-17-2009, 06:45 PM
And see your raise...

I was on campus at Duke last year when the freshmen were moving in, and now the moms are starting to look kinda young to me. :)

Young? They look really good.

Devil in the Blue Dress
08-17-2009, 08:22 PM
You guys came along too late to graduate from one of the co-ordinate colleges at Duke. I graduated from the Woman's College and lived all four years on East Campus. It was a great system.... all the benefits of all women school and a coed school!

devil84
08-17-2009, 08:28 PM
Many of the freshmen who will start at Duke this are younger than Duke's first men's basketball national championship.

I just moved my son into college. He was born 9 days after the first National Championship.

I had tickets to the game, but couldn't go due to complications. I lived in Dayton, an hour and some from Indy. That was tough to let my husband take my 27 month old daughter in my stead.

CameronBornAndBred
08-17-2009, 08:41 PM
Well since I don't hit 40 until later this year I am happy that Laettner should be feeling older than I do. (I think Duke basketball has the power to make everyone feel young by the way.)

ArnieMc
08-18-2009, 08:05 AM
You guys came along too late to graduate from one of the co-ordinate colleges at Duke. I graduated from the Woman's College and lived all four years on East Campus. It was a great system.... all the benefits of all women school and a coed school!Yep, I had a theory in the 60's that Duke was the most exclusive woman's college in the country. The men were just there as a stable and as (non-curve-breaking) filler for classes. Every decision by the administration was totally consistent with this assumption.

Devil in the Blue Dress
08-18-2009, 08:43 AM
Yep, I had a theory in the 60's that Duke was the most exclusive woman's college in the country. The men were just there as a stable and as (non-curve-breaking) filler for classes. Every decision by the administration was totally consistent with this assumption.

The truth is that through the late sixties and into the seventies, women had very limited choices when it came to top tier colleges or universities because there very few top tier colleges which admitted women then. My class in the Woman's College was comprised of about 200.

As for the men being there simply to fill classes, that certainly makes it sound like the men were intellectually inferior...... not true based on what I observed.

ArnieMc
08-18-2009, 01:20 PM
The truth is that through the late sixties and into the seventies, women had very limited choices when it came to top tier colleges or universities because there very few top tier colleges which admitted women then. My class in the Woman's College was comprised of about 200.

As for the men being there simply to fill classes, that certainly makes it sound like the men were intellectually inferior...... not true based on what I observed.My graduating class in '66 was around 500 - including women. I think there were around 60 engineers.

Average SAT scores for women were considerably higher than for men back then. Some guys tried to stay away from classes that included curve busters (you women).

Back to the topic "In case you want to feel old ...", I signed up for Medicare today. :eek:

hurleyfor3
08-18-2009, 01:28 PM
Yep, I had a theory in the 60's that Duke was the most exclusive woman's college in the country.

Hmmm... looks like Harvard and Radcliffe didn't merge all at once. Radcliffe girls got Harvard diplomas as early as 1963 but the colleges weren't fully integrated until 1977. (I still have my "Harvard-Radcliffe" rejection letter from 1989.) So you may be right.

Anyway, kids getting their driver's licenses now were never alive when the Soviet Union was.

sagegrouse
08-18-2009, 03:20 PM
The truth is that through the late sixties and into the seventies, women had very limited choices when it came to top tier colleges or universities because there very few top tier colleges which admitted women then. My class in the Woman's College was comprised of about 200.

As for the men being there simply to fill classes, that certainly makes it sound like the men were intellectually inferior...... not true based on what I observed.

Back in the day, the elite private college choices for women consisted of coed experiences at Harvard/Radcliffe, Columbia/Barnard, UPenn, Cornell, and Stanford -- plus Duke, if we add ourselves to this list (and why not?). Then there were the women-only schools of the Seven Sisters: Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, Vassar, and Bryn Mawr. Only Vassar became coed.

The Duke press releases of the time claimed that SAT scores and academic accomplishments were higher among Duke women than all but one of the "co-ordinate women's colleges," probably Radcliffe. Never did really understand what that meant.

The Women's College at the time was probably bigger than you say. My recollection is that each freshman class had 650+ men and there were 1/2 as many women at the Women's College (300+) and fewer than 100 in the nurscing freshman class. The total undergraduate student body was 3900 or so.

sagegrouse
'And I was there in Freshman Assembly when Dean Alan K. Manchester spoke and said -- "Look to the right; look to the left. If both of these men are here in four years, you won't be." This was an unaccountably dumb policy, in an era when the Ivy League was routinely graduating well over 90% of entering frosh. And despite his eminence as a historian, it was clear that Dean Manchester didn't know squat about statistics.'

Devil in the Blue Dress
08-18-2009, 03:46 PM
Back in the day, the elite private college choices for women consisted of coed experiences at Harvard/Radcliffe, Columbia/Barnard, UPenn, Cornell, and Stanford -- plus Duke, if we add ourselves to this list (and why not?). Then there were the women-only schools of the Seven Sisters: Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, Vassar, and Bryn Mawr. Only Vassar became coed.

The Duke press releases of the time claimed that SAT scores and academic accomplishments were higher among Duke women than all but one of the "co-ordinate women's colleges," probably Radcliffe. Never did really understand what that meant.

The Women's College at the time was probably bigger than you say. My recollection is that each freshman class had 650+ men and there were 1/2 as many women at the Women's College (300+) and fewer than 100 in the nurscing freshman class. The total undergraduate student body was 3900 or so.

sagegrouse
'And I was there in Freshman Assembly when Dean Alan K. Manchester spoke and said -- "Look to the right; look to the left. If both of these men are here in four years, you won't be." This was an unaccountably dumb policy, in an era when the Ivy League was routinely graduating well over 90% of entering frosh. And despite his eminence as a historian, it was clear that Dean Manchester didn't know squat about statistics.'

It's true that each class in the Woman's College began with far more women in it than graduated. Duke didn't subscribe to retention of students then. There were about 200 in my graduating class. (I have a copy of my transcript which notes the number in the class.) I remember hearing that the ratio of men to women was about four to one.

While Dean Manchester and his successor were giving that speech to you men, Dean Ball was telling us that we were expected to go to graduate school and be high achievers. The idea of not having a career was out of the question. By the time my sister was a freshman (W '72) five years later, Dean Ball had the words to the Alma Mater and the fight songs handed out at the freshman assembly just before the first home game. She told them they'd need to know these words for the football game and then led them in singing.

Indoor66
08-18-2009, 03:47 PM
feel old ...", I signed up for Medicare today. :eek:

Welcome to the fraternity. :o

Devil in the Blue Dress
08-18-2009, 03:48 PM
My graduating class in '66 was around 500 - including women. I think there were around 60 engineers.

Average SAT scores for women were considerably higher than for men back then. Some guys tried to stay away from classes that included curve busters (you women).

Back to the topic "In case you want to feel old ...", I signed up for Medicare today. :eek:

I'll be joining you in a year! (Class of '67)

Indoor66
08-18-2009, 06:15 PM
I'll be joining you in a year! (Class of '67)

Oops, and sorority!

Shammrog
08-19-2009, 09:22 AM
Young? They look really good.

Ditto.

ArnieMc
08-19-2009, 01:03 PM
And see your raise...

I was on campus at Duke last year when the freshmen were moving in, and now the moms are starting to look kinda young to me. :)Yep, I've moved on from MILFs to GMILFs.

airowe
08-19-2009, 01:05 PM
Yep, I've moved on from MILFs to GMILFs.

I think the street term these days is GILF (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gilf). **Link contains language**