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Thread: Toxic For Pets

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Redding, CT

    Toxic For Pets

    From front page of aol.com

    Grapes and Raisins
    Bread dough
    Chewing gum (and artificial sweetener xylitol)
    Macadamia nuts
    Nicotine
    Chocolate
    Alcohol
    Pain relievers
    Tea
    Onions

  2. #2
    I'll quit feeding my cats Martinis. They will be disappointed.

    Where'd all the Kleenex go?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Bern, NC unless it's a home football game then I'm grilling on Devil's Alley
    The vet office posters say marijuana is toxic too. I always wondered if that's true, or if the government encouraged them to slip that one in on their list.
    Mmmm, BBQ!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, FL
    Pain relievers isn't quite right...dogs can take low dose aspirin (never ever Tylenol) on occasion - as well as some over the counter antihistamines, Imodium and a few other human medications. Chocolate is true and not true...it will kill them, in quantities that are substantial if you are talking Hershey bars. Bakers chocolate is another matter, but it is so bitter they won't usually eat it.

    On the list of who would a 'thunk it'...I damn near killed my standard poodle with potato peels. They were in the trash and he went trash diving...turns out they are extremely alkaline when raw - he started having seizures which woke me, I saw the trash dumped over and figured it was something he ate...fortunately I knew how to make him barf and he recovered.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Redding, CT

    Potato Peels?

    Who knew? Thanks for the tip.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Back in the dirty Jerz
    My dad used to feed our dogs grapes until we learned several years ago that was a big no no. Luckily, she seems no worse for wear.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lexington, KY

    Red face ycch

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish80 View Post
    From front page of aol.com

    Grapes and Raisins
    Bread dough
    Chewing gum (and artificial sweetener xylitol)
    Macadamia nuts
    Nicotine
    Chocolate
    Alcohol
    Pain relievers
    Tea
    Onions
    Our puppy seems to find all the cigarette butts buried in our grass, and she has also found loads of gum. Makes me wonder about the previous homeowners.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    In your attic
    Sago palms (seen here) can cause liver failure in dogs. My wife made me move ours to the front yard.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Our Miss Holly was very ill two years ago, I think from eating grapes.

    She's sick right now so we took a trip to the vet last night (of course right during the Duke/TN game so I missed the entire thing). A couple came in with their two spaniels - between them the dogs had eaten about 10lbs of chocolate pellets. No idea why the woman buys so much chocolate. Anyway, no idea if the dogs made it or not but it did not sound good.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, FL
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDevilBaby View Post
    A couple came in with their two spaniels - between them the dogs had eaten about 10lbs of chocolate pellets. No idea why the woman buys so much chocolate. Anyway, no idea if the dogs made it or not but it did not sound good.
    That is a LOT of chocolate for two not so big dogs. I hope they got to the vet quickly before all of chocolate had been digested and the theobromine absorbed.


    Pulled this down from talktothevet.com:

    The good news is that it takes, on average, a fairly large amount of theobromine 100-150 mg/kg to cause a toxic reaction. Although there are variables to consider like the individual sensitivity, animal size and chocolate concentration.

    On average,
    Milk chocolate contains 44 mg of theobromine per oz.
    Semisweet chocolate contains 150mg/oz.
    Baker's chocolate 390mg/oz.

    Using a dose of 100 mg/kg as the toxic dose it comes out roughly as:
    1 ounce per 1 pound of body weight for Milk chocolate
    1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weight for Semisweet chocolate
    1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight for Baker's chocolate.

    So, for example, 2 oz. of Baker's chocolate can cause great risk to an 15 lb. dog. Yet, 2 oz. of Milk chocolate usually will only cause digestive problems.

    So for my 90 lbs lab 90 oz of milk chocolate (5.6 pounds) would be a toxic dose. I hope it was milk chocolate and they were BIG spaniels.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Redding, CT
    Thanks for the chocolate info.

    Last year, or maybe the year before, after valentine's day, my beagle got into my daughter's room and found a bag of milk chocolate hearts. We got lucky because she didn't eat them all at once. She ate a couple and then hid all the rest all over the house, mostly stuffed down in chairs and couches. For several months we kept finding hidden chocolates.

    She's about 25 pounds, so maybe 1.5 pounds of milk chocolate would be fatal. The bag was probably 12 or 16 ounces. Still a very high dose if consumed all at once.

    I can't imagine why someone had 10 pounds of chocolate pellets on hand, unless they're professional bakers or practice some form of chocolate sorcery.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    ^She said she actually had bought 30 lbs. I thought the same - what the heck. The dogs were about 25 - 30 lbs each. Unfortunately, the couple had come home to find the dogs already throwing up.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lexington, KY

    Question Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Windsor View Post
    Pulled this down from talktothevet.com:

    The good news is that it takes, on average, a fairly large amount of theobromine 100-150 mg/kg to cause a toxic reaction. Although there are variables to consider like the individual sensitivity, animal size and chocolate concentration.

    On average,
    Milk chocolate contains 44 mg of theobromine per oz.
    Semisweet chocolate contains 150mg/oz.
    Baker's chocolate 390mg/oz.
    Any difference between cooked and uncooked chocolate? I.e., what happens to the theobromine after the chocolate is cooked? We use semisweet chocolate chips. Is it any safer after we have baked it?

    Thanks,
    Lavabe

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Lavabe View Post
    Any difference between cooked and uncooked chocolate? I.e., what happens to the theobromine after the chocolate is cooked? We use semisweet chocolate chips. Is it any safer after we have baked it?

    Thanks,
    Lavabe
    I have no idea if cooking the chocolate changes the theobromine. Georgia is an adorable puppy, but why would you want to share your chocolate with her, or anyone, whether it was cooked or not cooked? (No chocolate for dogs = more chocolate for humans. And that's a good thing!)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    553 miles north of Cameron
    Quote Originally Posted by CameronBornAndBred View Post
    The vet office posters say marijuana is toxic too. I always wondered if that's true, or if the government encouraged them to slip that one in on their list.
    Years ago (late 70's) friends of ours had a golden retriever that ate half a bag that was left on the coffee table. The dog was never the same. She lived a long time afterwards, but was always half a step slow.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lexington, KY

    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by DukieInKansas View Post
    I have no idea if cooking the chocolate changes the theobromine. Georgia is an adorable puppy, but why would you want to share your chocolate with her, or anyone, whether it was cooked or not cooked? (No chocolate for dogs = more chocolate for humans. And that's a good thing!)
    We bake choco chip cookies (we don't bake oatmeal cookies). Georgia is known to have pilfered things we've left on the kitchen counter.

    It's just a matter of time before she pilfers something not good for her.

    The other thing more serious is that a lot of the bark mulch in the neighborhood is darkened with something unidentified. ILJ swears it's coffee (not good for dogs).

    Keeping our dog away from bark mulch is nearly impossible.

    Cheers,
    Lavabe

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, FL
    Quote Originally Posted by Lavabe View Post
    We bake choco chip cookies (we don't bake oatmeal cookies). Georgia is known to have pilfered things we've left on the kitchen counter.

    It's just a matter of time before she pilfers something not good for her.

    The other thing more serious is that a lot of the bark mulch in the neighborhood is darkened with something unidentified. ILJ swears it's coffee (not good for dogs).

    Keeping our dog away from bark mulch is nearly impossible.

    Cheers,
    Lavabe

    Since heat is used in the production of chocolate from cocoa beans I would guess that cooking makes no difference. The occassional chocolate chip cookie is not going to hurt her. If you use a 12 oz bag of chips how many dozen cookies does that make? She'd have to go on a serious cookie fest to ingest enough chocolate to make her even a little ill

    I hope your neighbors' mulch is not this

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA.
    I used to give my dog M&Ms once in a while, before I found out that chocolate is not good for dogs. She never suffered any ill effects whatsoever, but then again I am talking about tossing her one or two M&Ms once or twice in a three-month period.

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