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  1. #1

    What's the weirdest thing you've eaten?

    I'm watching Iron Chef, my nightly ritual and man do they really hook up some weird ingredients. So it got me thinking, what is the weirdest thing you've eaten? For me, it's a toss up between beef tongue, chicken feet, or sharks fin. They don't sound too weird but the presentation is what sealed the deal. When I went to China on business, a few of the restaurants brought out whole chicken feet, claws and everything. The beef tongue was in a stew with mushrooms and it looked like, well a mushroom stew with tongues floating around in it. I could go my whole life without either of those dishes again, but the sharks fin soup... ymmm!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ← Bay / Valley ↓
    Dog. Yes, it was in Korea. Though to be honest, the name of the dish also refers to a goat dish, so I can never be sure what it was I ate...

    Assuming it was goat, I guess chicken feet at a dim-sum is the weirdest thing. I've also had turtle soup and shark's fin, but I think the chicken feet looked the weirdest

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Tempura haggis.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by hc5duke View Post
    but I think the chicken feet looked the weirdest
    Amen! I'm down with the philosophy of using the entire animal but there is something very unsettling about staring down at a plate of feet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Clearwater, FL
    Rattlesnake....proving that with enough garlic and butter you can eat darn near anything.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Bern, NC unless it's a home football game then I'm grilling on Devil's Alley
    In Japan, I ate sea urchin. It tasted as disgusting as it looked. But I did try it. They figured since we were Americans, we had never had sushi, so they took us to a sushi bar. This scenario repeated itself almost every night we were there.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    In Huntsville, AL, I had the most delicious kangaroo stew at an Australian restaurant. It was, bar none, the best stew I've ever had. Tender and scrumptious -- sort of like beef, only better.

  8. #8
    Well, I got near a plate of 'prarie oysters" but nearly passed out in fright. Does that count? Who eats those things?!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dillon, Colorado
    My "first-time sushi" story is that the chef gave me a fried shrimp head. Receiving one is apparently a sign the chef likes you, and custom requires one to eat it when offered.
    Sometimes I mistake this for a universe that cares. -- xkcd #625

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Bern, NC unless it's a home football game then I'm grilling on Devil's Alley
    Quote Originally Posted by weezie View Post
    Well, I got near a plate of 'prarie oysters" but nearly passed out in fright. Does that count? Who eats those things?!
    Frisky cows.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Kumbi Kumbi, which is Swahili for a kind of ant in their flying stage. They appeared one morning and the kids were popping them in their mouth, alive. They are considered a treat. Not too bad. And a whole lot better than some other delicacies mentioned in this thread.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greenville, NC
    Chicken feet at dim sum in SF.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by weezie View Post
    Well, I got near a plate of 'prarie oysters" but nearly passed out in fright. Does that count? Who eats those things?!
    I went to a company Christmas Party in Greensboro and there was a mysterious jar of amber liquid with shriveled "somethings" floating around. I asked what it was and everyone said they were "Rocky Mountain Oysters" and asked if I would like to try them. I politely said no and then watched as everyone in the office grabbed a fork and dove right in. I was disgusted. It wasn't until later in the afternoon that I found out it was actually plum shine. At that point, I dove right in.

    Anywho, I've always said that I'll try just about anything once, and I suppose that includes the "special oysters". Though I would prefer it if they didn't tell me what I was eating so I could see if I enjoyed the flavor without the psychological impact of knowing which organ I was about to consume.

  14. #14
    You asked what it was. You can't complain about them telling you if you ask.
    LET'S GO DUKE!

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by bjornolf View Post
    You asked what it was. You can't complain about them telling you if you ask.
    In the case of plum shine, I most certainly can complain because they lied to me, which then delayed the consumption of the yummy homemade plum shine.

    In other situations, I totally agree. If something tastes great, and I really enjoy it, and then find out what it is I'd probably keep eating it.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ← Bay / Valley ↓
    Quote Originally Posted by 2535Miles View Post
    If something tastes great, and I really enjoy it, and then find out what it is I'd probably keep eating it.
    Soylent green is people!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Quote Originally Posted by hc5duke View Post
    Soylent green is people!
    well played.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by hc5duke View Post
    Soylent green is people!
    Well played indeed!

  19. #19

    Agutuk, or "Eskimo ice cream"

    I had this one time in Alaska. I was in a small Ypik town about 6 hours (by plane) from Anchorage

    2 Cups seal oil
    1 pound reindeer fat
    Berries
    Snow

    Directions
    Boil the oil & reindeer fat together for 2 to 3 minutes. Cool until lukewarm. Take a bowlful of loose snow (not too powdery) and add oil; beat well to avoid lumps. Let freeze a bit. Then fold in wild berries

    They added some sugar for me and my friends as they though we were too "American" to eat it in the traditional way.

    You should remain close to a bathroom for a few hours after eating.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ← Bay / Valley ↓
    Quote Originally Posted by allenmurray View Post
    I had this one time in Alaska. I was in a small Ypik town about 6 hours (by plane) from Anchorage

    2 Cups seal oil
    1 pound reindeer fat
    Berries
    Snow

    Directions
    Boil the oil & reindeer fat together for 2 to 3 minutes. Cool until lukewarm. Take a bowlful of loose snow (not too powdery) and add oil; beat well to avoid lumps. Let freeze a bit. Then fold in wild berries

    They added some sugar for me and my friends as they though we were too "American" to eat it in the traditional way.

    You should remain close to a bathroom for a few hours after eating.
    I think we have a winner

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